1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

How much of the rib should I see for trap?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Lostintheozone, Jan 2, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Lostintheozone

    Lostintheozone Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Messages:
    71
    I generally shoot trap with my field guns for practice. So you can say that I'm not really a trap shooter. My guns are generally set up to pattern where I aim or slightly higher. When I look down the rib of a trap gun I usually see a lot more of the rib than I do with a field gun and the combs are always higher. Is this to put the pattern above the point of aim to compensate for the rising bird and allow the shooter to "float" the target above the bead? If so, how much of the rib should I see if the trap gun is properly fitted. If the gun has two beads should the mid bead be directly below the bead on the muzzle? I assume this wouldn't vary much from shooter to shooter or am I wrong?

    Jim
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,426
    First you shoot the gun. Then you make the adjustments as needed to get what you like. HMB
     
  3. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,055
    Location:
    Near but not in chicago
    You should as you do for bird hunting concentrate on the target. Who cares what amount of rib you should see?
     
  4. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,209
    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Have the trap throw straight-a-ways from three and experiment 1/16th of an inch at a time 'til you're in the middle of them. Don't worry about shooting at a pattern board - that wont tell you what your are asking to know for this exercise.

    If you are going to shoot long yardage handicap targets you'll need to see more rib and do the same thing you did with your sixteen yard hold point - but start where your sixteen yard point has been established.

    Good Luck, and, if you're shooting trap you ARE a Trapshooter. Happy New Year.
     
  5. jimrich60

    jimrich60 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2007
    Messages:
    810
    How any particular shotgun shoots for you (that is, where the POI is) is likely to be entirely different than for another shooter in so far as how much rib is "seen" or not, whether or not the beads stack in a "figure eight" or not and so on. Trap shooters generally want their guns to shoot high, to compensensate for the fact that a trap target is rising when shot. Just how high is purely a matter of individual taste and comfort, with some choosing to shoot something like a 30/70 (that is, 70 percent of the shot hits above point of aim at the accepted 40 yds) and some liking an extreme high POI of 120 percent (that is, the entire shot pattern being some 20 percent above the point of aim.) And just about every setting in between. In addition, some choose to raise the POI to some extent for handicap ranges, but others do not.

    Since you are using a field gun, and most field guns generally pattern somewhere around 50/50 (that is the patttern is more or less centered around the point of aim when shouldered normally), you would probably have to hold the eye/bead relationship ship such that you would see a fair amount of the rib. You must remember that for a shotgun, the rear "sight" is your eye, and front sight is the front bead. the POI is "adjusted" by either raising or lowering the rear sight (changes the POI in the direction you move the rear "sight") or raising or lowering the front "sight" (bead) Since moving the front bead requires an adjustable rib, something not normally found on a field gun, the only practical way to change the the POI is thus to raise or lower the position of the rear "sight" (your eye) in relation to the front bead. On a target gun, this is done through use of an adjustable comb, but on a gun without such, you can add on a temporary pad or something to raise your eye position. Of course, most casual shooters simply adjust where their point of aim is to hit the rising target if using a non adjustable field gun. This is where following Barrys advice helps. Simply shoot the gun at some targets to determine where the POI is for you, then adjust the point of aim to adjust as necessary to center the targets in the shot pattern. Remember also that while you can "raise the rear sight" (your eye) a bit to raise the POI on a field gun, if you raise your head to far up, you will lose firm contact with the stock, and this will like result in a lot of misses from lack of consistent head position each and every shot since you cannot raise the comb to keep contact firm.

    But many shooters over the years have been great trap shooters with standard, non adjustable shotguns, by merely learning to shoot their guns where they naturally point for them. That is basically what you have to do with a field gun. After all, adjustable shotguns are a relatively new phenomena.

    Jim R
     
  6. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,939
    If your gun fits you correctly then remove the centerbead. This way there is nothing but rib between your eye and the front bead. This way you can concentrate on the task at hand, breaking targets and setting the POI.

    For some reason we, as shooters, have become dependant on a mid-bead that does more harm than good. They are great for detecting a cant, from improper fit, but are worthless for anything else.

    ss
     
  7. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Messages:
    11,137
    BS (cough,cough, while looking into the stratosphere)
     
  8. rick979

    rick979 Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    1,908
    The question you pose has no answer.
     
  9. X Trap 2

    X Trap 2 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,125
    The way my gun fits me, or does not fit me, I see about 1/4 inch between the beads. Now I do not use this to aim with as I shoot off the end of the barrel. I usually do not put my head against the stock and I mount the butt high on my shoulder. Now this would not work for most people but it works for me.

    Do want works for you and that is what counts. The main thing is that the gun shoots where you are looking and you need to be looking at the right place. Always lead the birds according to the angle being thrown. Ray.......
     
  10. threedeuces

    threedeuces TS Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Messages:
    638
    I am glad it works for you but your way would probably cause me to quit shooting a shotgun all together. How in the world do you shoot at trap without putting your head on the stock? Yikes! Actually I would like to see how it is done.
     
  11. warren

    warren Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    948
    Location:
    Fernley, Nevada
    All of it.

    warren
     
  12. KEYBEAR

    KEYBEAR Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,222
    Just what is float the target ? I shoot 120% high and have never did the FLOAT THE TARGET thing .
     
  13. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    6,260
    What you are getting at is the question of where does the gun shoot for you. Since you are shooting field guns, they typically shoot flat meaning the rib is parallel to the bore and if you sight straight down the rib, the pattern will be centered in your line of sight.

    So if you wanted the gun to shoot higher, which is a good thing on rising trap targets, you would want to see a fair amount of rib on your field gun. One way to do that is to build your comb up with some moleskin such that your rear sight (your eye) is elevated. The better solution is an adjustable comb. The proceedure for determining how much elevation is required is similar to sighting in a rifle only you do it by shooting at straight away targets and reading the breaks. What you do is incrementally raise the comb until you are convinced that you are shooting the tops off and then go backwards until you are sure you are shooting low - then split the difference of the adjustment range and call that your zero. Repeat as necessary to make sure you got a true zero. You will know true zero because the targets turn to smoke when you hit them - no chips, just a black spot in the sky.

    The amount of rib you see will depend on your build and the characteristics of your gun. Don't get hung up on that detail and forget about that middle bead.
     
  14. phirel

    phirel TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,556
    The function of the middle bead is to make sure the gun is mounted correctly and your eye is centered down the rib. I do check this alignment every 4-6 shots. A gun that fits you well can be mounted incorrectly. The space between the middle bead and the front sight is not relevant.

    The real trick to shooting trap is to keep your eye looking straight through the front sight and at the target when you can no longer see the front sight. It is so easy to lift your head just a little while looking at the bird and this will result in a lost target.

    Pat Ireland
     
  15. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,539
    Location:
    Oxford MA
    I can't speak for the rest that have posted to this thread. All I can do is tell you what I do. I don't see the Rib so I can't answer that question either.

    What I do is look at the target. I look out over the traphouse in the area where I expect to see the target emerge. I mount the gun without looking at it. Call for the target look at the target and then swing to the target. When the end of my gun and the target meet I pull the trigger. End of sequence when it becomes my turn again I do it all again.

    BTW the answer to your question is NONE if you are looking at rib you are not looking at the target. Which IMO is counter productive I wantto see tatget in my vision not rib.

    Bob Lawless
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page
fromt bead for trap
,

how much eye to see above shotgun rib

,

how much rib should i see on my shotgun

,

how much rib should you see on a shotgun

,

how to adjust rib on trap gun

,

how to aim for trap

,

how to raise the front site on trap shotgun

,
how to setup a trap gun