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How much faster with 9000,9000H, P-W,366, ?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by riflegunbuilder, Apr 12, 2007.

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  1. riflegunbuilder

    riflegunbuilder Member

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    I'm thinking of upgrading to something. 9000, 9000H, 366, P-W, or even just buying a Hydra unit for my Grabber. I would like to get more loads per hour. I checked last night, and at a real leisurely pace I made 200-210 shells in an hour. That included filling machine, and hull and wad bins.

    My reservation about going to P-W or 366 is how much does one weigh? I have my MECs mounted on 3/4" plywood and C clamp them to the bench top. During the fall I move the loaders off my bench so I can clean rifles. Right now I am a little cramped and don't have room for another bench.

    Anybody have experince with several of the above options? Which one would gain me the biggest increase in output for $$s spent?
     
  2. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Active Member

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    A PW will easily double that and maybe triple without the Hydraulic and let you take break for a whiz and refill that Glenlivet! Jeff
     
  3. Bob_K

    Bob_K Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Afton, Virginia
    Yup, my hydraulic MEC allows me to load a couple of flats after dinner, and not have a sore right arm. Really worthwhile as one gets older...
     
  4. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Banned User Banned

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    At the tender age of 60, I routinely load a flat of 12, 20 or 28 in about 22 minutes with a 9000GN. 410's take a few minutes longer. I prefer the manual press for the feel of the press in case something sticks or does not go in the right hole at the right time. YMMV

    The hydraulics will spit out a damaged round without your noticing it. The manual will feel different or freeze so you can fix the glitch and march on.
     
  5. Dale Z

    Dale Z TS Member

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    Feb 16, 2007
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    I have a used Hornady 366 (over 10 years old) which I have mounted on a piece of 3/4" plywood 2' X 3'. I put 2 to 4 bags of shot on the back side to keep the plywood down on the table. Presently do not use any clamps of any kind. Once I fill up a flat of shells, I then start stacking the loaded flats where the shot once was. I have been debating to get the larger shot tube to extend the time between refillings. Presently I have to stop and refill the shot tube every 13 - 15 minutes. I'm not trying to set any records reloading, but have loaded about a flat of shells while the evening news was on. My brother claims that he can reload about 400 per hour with his 366. Changing powder and shot bushings is real fast and simple. I do not have the hydralic assist and the biggest problem I have is that the primer is not completely falling into the hole because of speeding up the upstroke. Getting into a rhythmn really helps. The 366 has been around since the late 60's so it has a good history. I haven't tried the new primer seater as it is suppose to let you change from one hull to the next without readjusting the loader. I'm real happy with mine, as it produces "looking like new" reloads. My 366 was purchased off of Ebay for $140.00. It paid for itself during the first 5 flats of shells reloaded. Besides I have sentimental reasons for the Hornady-Pacific-Bair-DL loaders as they were orginally manufactured in Lincoln Ne. and my father used to shoot trap with Bob Deitemeir in the 60's. Still have my 105 that I purchased new in 74.

    Dale
    Lincoln NE.
     
  6. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    If you get the 366 with all of the upgrades including swing-out wad guide and automatic finished shell eject you will be able to load 500 to 600 per hour. I don't usually go that fast but I have in the past just to prove I could.
     
  7. riflegunbuilder

    riflegunbuilder Member

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    366s are starting to sound like they may be a step in the right direction to increase shells per hour from my Grabber. What kind of price range am I looking at for used 366s? What all updates do I need? How do I tell if a used one has all the updates?
     
  8. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    I would not have thought the 366 could reload that quickly.

    On the PW800+, with a case feeder, I get about 500-600 per hour; but I may not very co-ordinated.

    I detested the MEC9000 but many folks have good luck with them. Again, it may just be me.

    If you can, try the different machines and select the one YOU prefer.

    Don
     
  9. OhioBob

    OhioBob TS Member

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    400/hr is a reasonable speed for the 366 including refills and coffee sipping...Dale Z has hit on the best way to set one up, I've done the same with mine. Had mine since 81....No updates on mine....still working great....I wouldn't have any idea how many shells thru it...I still have the smaller shot and powder tubes and use refill time for a sip of coffee and a potty break.

    Bob T
     
  10. 333t

    333t Member

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    riflegunbuilder:

    Look for a late model Pacific or earlier Hornady 366-Auto. The Auto model gives you auto-advance, powder and shot shutoffs, the swing-out wad guide, and auto shell eject. (thru a hole in the lower casting). These will also have the reversable handle and spring loaded wad seating station which are very desirable features not found on the current Hornady model.

    You should be able to find a nice used unit on eBay or elsewhere for $200-275 or so. The new spring loaded primer seater is a nice accessory that allows you to change hulls without adjusting the primer seater. In my opinion the primer shutoff update is not worth the price, there are easy work arounds for this.

    Avoid the older Pacific 366 manual advance units. They will be lacking the swing out wad guide and ejection hole in the lower casting. Many of them are blue in color. They are good presses but you won't develop the speed you will with a 366 Auto.

    The 366 Auto is very well built and easy to use and adjust once you get through the learning period. There is very little that will ever wear out and parts are readily available form Hornady and reasonably priced. I think a good used 366 Auto is probably the best deal around.

    Phil
     
  11. rollnblock

    rollnblock Member

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    Dec 25, 2005
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    I have two 366's one is a early 70's model. manuel index. i converted it over to 20 gauge when i got a newer auto index. the newer auto index is twenty years old. just this year i did some updating to it. I added the spring loaded primer seater. and the bigger shot and powder tubes. those are two additions i will advise to get. the primer cut off i didnt get as for years i would take a primer and insert it into the bottom of the tube upside down, when i wanted no more primers to fall.

    some one mentioned primers not falling all the time. i have found that the tube wasnt centered exactly over the primer hole in the plate. all it took was a slight tap from a dead blow hammer. once its centered you dont have any more problems. also i took a dremel with a cutting wheel and put a slice (running the lenght of the tube) in the lower tube where i could see the primers. helped me out after the bigger tubes of not running out of primers.

    Hope that helps some of yall.
    Dave
     
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