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How many targets do I need to establish a class?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by sshotshell, Jun 24, 2012.

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  1. sshotshell

    sshotshell Member

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    I'm confused. How many registered targets(league and regular) do I need to shoot to establish a 16yd. letter (AA, A, B etc.) clasification with ATA? In what time frame? Thanks in advance...

    Jerry Felice
     
  2. gsw7880

    gsw7880 Member

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    500 for singles. Must be ATA registered targets.

    George
     
  3. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    Jerry, George is correct with 500 for a permanent class. Now after your first ATA shoot will have have a score and a temp. class. If you shoot a 90 then a 90 ave. is yours until your next shoot. So then you shoot again and you ave. both of those scores and so on until you have shot 500 then that's your ave. until all your scores ave. high enough to move up/ or down a class. Only ATA Reg. targets will count in your ave. Practice and your clubs league shoots do not count at all. Only shoots that have ATA Reg targets will count. break em all Jeff
     
  4. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    If you shoot a 100 straight in your first Singles event and first Handicap event, it won't take 500 targets to establish your spot. LOL
     
  5. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    The ATA Rule Book has guidelines for classification but not hard and fast rules. A major shoot like the State Shoot will have a requirement for a minimum number of targets to avoid a Penalty Class and these will be published in the shoot program. For a small club shoot the classification is up to the discretion of shoot management. If a new shooter with 200 registered targets and an average in the 60s or 70s shows up I would put him/her in a lower class without waiting for 500 targets on their card.
     
  6. John Galt

    John Galt TS Member

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    The ATA doesn't assign classes so nobody can say for sure how many targets you need to establish a class for any particular shoot. How many you will need will be as described in the shoot program. The ATA assigns handicap yardage but not singles or doubles classes.
     
  7. hfrogdogc

    hfrogdogc Member

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    If you go to a big shoot with less than 500 targets in singles you will be put in B class.
     
  8. Mike Hessong* (MH*)

    Mike Hessong* (MH*) Active Member

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    From the responses to a lot of posts on this site, you can have thousands of targets, and still have NO class !!!

    Just had to throw that out there, for a Monday.
     
  9. 870

    870 Well-Known Member

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    Asked and answered above, but I have to ask where does this talk of earning a "permanent class" come from. I see it appear above, and have seen other posts talking about new shooters having to earn a "permanant card" from ATA.

    There is simply no such thing. Was there something way back that has led to this misunderstanding?
     
  10. tom berry

    tom berry Active Member

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    sshotshell, you've received several answers but the one that I think is most correct is John Galt's. You are assigned a classification at every shoot you attend. As new shooter the ATA rules don't address a 'suggested' class. The rules state that it is the descretion of shoot management. And yes, your practice and league can be used to help the classifier assign the proper class.

    All that being said, it is quite common for new shooters to be assigned to 'B' class until they've shot enough targets for their average to stand on it's own, so to speak. The 500 targets reference above is, again, just one of those numbers that many classifiers might consider enough to use just your average.

    Enjoy the sport.
     
  11. Tech Writer Jeff

    Tech Writer Jeff Active Member

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    "870" asked about a "permanent card" . . . and if there was such a thing "way back when".

    I started shooting in the mid-1970s, and back then, there was such a thing . . . for handicap yardage, but not for 16s or Doubles class. If I remember correctly, all adult males were initially assigned a "temporary" yardage of 22 yards. Your paper average card was actually marked "T-22", and you had to shoot your first few ATA events at 22 yards. After some number of registered targets (I forget how many), if you did not earn any yardage in the meantime from 22, they reduced you to 20 yards, and sent you a "permanent" card marked at 20 yards. Temporary and permanent yardages were less for ladies and juniors, if I remember correctly.

    I believe 1977 was the last year they did this. Starting with target-year 1978, all adult males started their ATA career at 20 yards, and there was no longer any "temporary" to "permanent" transition period.

    (I hope I'm remembering everything accurately).

    - Jeff
     
  12. wm rike

    wm rike Member

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    They say XXXX, but I've been to big shoots and been classified on the basis of my last 100. I think the XXXX number is just to demonstrate your support of the game.
     
  13. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    None. When you go to a registered shot you will be classified based on your current and previous target year averages. If you have no registered targets to average you will probably be assigned to B class or if it is a bigger shoot you may have to shoot a penalty class (usually A class) if you don't have enough registered targets in the disipline. (normally 500 minimum)

    Your ATA shoot card will never state what class you should be in - it just provides your Handicap yardage and what ever averages you have from the previous two years. From that point you need to record the results from all the registered shoots you participate in and update your current target year averages with those results. All this data is considered by the handicapper the next time you go to a shoot and will determine what class you shoot in.
     
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