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How many shells, per hour, from a MEC 600JR?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Barak, May 6, 2007.

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  1. Barak

    Barak Guest

    I'm thinking of getting into reloading but I'm not exactly the "Handy Andy" type. As a result, I was thinking of starting with a simple, single stage reloader. How many shells per hour could I expect to produce on a MEC 600 JR?
    Thanks in advance for your replies.
    Charlie
     
  2. Gargoyle!

    Gargoyle! TS Member

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    The 600 jr is a fine loader to START OFF WITH. Its slow but you will learn from it. You will want to go up to a 9000G in the future. As for the numbers per hour? Sorry but I have forgotten. The 9000G will double it.
     
  3. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    100 - 125

    HM
     
  4. JLSIMON

    JLSIMON Member

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    Barak,
    As Gargoyle says the 600jr is the perfect loader to learn on. Things happen too fast on the 9000 when you are not sure what you are doing. If I'm going at warp speed, I can do 125/hr boxed on the Jr. I still use mine to load shells for Games. Starting out, speed should not be your main goal. To many, reloading is one of the enjoyable parts of our sport. Bushing tables mean nothing, other than getting an idea of where to start. Getting and using a scale is a must. Good Luck and Shoot'em up.

    Jim
     
  5. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Don't throw away the money on a 600. Even though you're not a Handy Andy, you can load a single shell at a time on progressive machines (9000G). Make the investment once.

    I started on an old Lee Load-All. 5 strokes per shell is a PITA. I wasted no time in getting a progressive machine. Go progressive, start slow - one shell at a time and work your way up to fully progressive 5-6 shells per pull.

    Jay
     
  6. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    With the price of shot you may want to reconsider reloading. Cheaper to buy
    Walmart specials. Fred
     
  7. Gargoyle!

    Gargoyle! TS Member

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    I started on the 600 then the 600jr and then went to the 9000G. Spitter is right but you also need to learn how a loader works and what to watch for before going to something that will fustrat(sp) you. If you have someone at your club that is willing to sit you down at their 9000G loader and let you load for them and have them teach you the do's and don't and what to watch out for you will do well by doing so before buying a loader.
     
  8. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

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    Charlie: It's been a "ton" of years since I started reloading. Yes, it was with a 600 JR. If I recall correctly; if everything went right I could load a box every 10 minutes. If you don't shoot much and have the time; the 600 JR will serve you well. However, if you are going to reload for the sake of saving a few $$ and you haven't got a lot of spare time; my advice is to buy Gun Clubs, Estates, etc. If it were me; I would look into buying a Grabber. (If you feel, as I do, that reloading is part of your shooting experience) Take your time learning it's operation, don't be in a hurry and the Grabber will take care of all your needs and once you are used to it; you can produce twice as many shells per hour compared to the 600 JR. Ed
     
  9. K-Gun

    K-Gun TS Member

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    I started with a 600jr but 6 pulls on the handle per shell got old.

    Next was a very nice progressive that could turn a "Fender Bender" into a "Train Wreck" in a flash.

    Then I got a Mec 9000H, now the "Fender Bender" just turns into an inconvenience and is easy to fix.

    Start out with a 600jr and learn to reload. Even later the 600 will help repair the Fender Bender on the Faster Machine.
     
  10. BP348

    BP348 Active Member

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    Charlie,

    I just started reloading a few months ago with a jr. I load about 100 per hour. I hope as things go on to move that number up some.

    Maybe one day I'll move up to the 9000g but for now I can load all the shells I need for a month of shooting in 2 or 3 hours.

    The advice about the gun clubs or estates is good as well but there are some places, like where I live, where you can't find them for the prices that everyone else seems to be paying for them.
     
  11. keennt

    keennt TS Member

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    I have an extra Mec 650 progressive loader, with 5 extra charge bars, about 20 bushings, a shell sizer with wood handle, an RCBS 5-10 reloading scale. the 650 has the auto primer feeder, large wood handle, I also have 2 extra primer trays..a bunch of parts, like springs and bolts.etc.... also the 650 manual, + 3 reloading books, (soft-cover)..Package deal $225 + Shipping...My zip code is 55792......I can email pics......
     
  12. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    Barak, I have used the 600 Jr. for a long time now. I can at best pace reload 200 shells in a hour. This is a impossible pace to keep up thou. About 5 boxes an hour is a good # for consisant reloading. It allows you to go thou your hulls (check for good and bad), and filling bottles and supplies. It is a slow reloader as reloading goes. It will serve you well if you do not need alot of shells per month. It depends on your time available to you per month. The cost of the machine should not influance your decision on which reloader to buy. You will always get back the same percentage of original price if you decide to ever sell your machine. The two most important questions you might ask yourself is the machine to time equal to number of shells needed per month and in your future, and do I want to reload at all. With the price today of economy shells it really makes no sense for me to reload 12 ga. shells at this time. The price of components are very high at this time. It may or may not come down in the future, only time will tell.Do you have access to shot at a good price? and other components as well? Check out before you buy. Do your homework and whatever you do will be fine. Break-em all. Jeff
     
  13. famill00

    famill00 TS Member

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    Barak,
    Take him up on the 650 offer. I can get way more than 100 shells per hour with the 650. The Jr. will get old quickly!

    Forrest
     
  14. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    If your a hunter or part time shooter, shooting several boxes a month, go for the JR. If you have a practice day or/and leagues and also like to shoot registered go with the 9000G or Grabber and don't look back.

    It's not all that hard or I would have blown up the neighborhood or my gun years ago...
     
  15. trapshootin hippie

    trapshootin hippie Well-Known Member

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    I have been reloading on a 600 for years. Bout a box in 5 minutes is the best I can do.
     
  16. foghorn220

    foghorn220 Active Member

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    I remember when I used to load on a 600 JR and thought I was cranking out 100 between 20 to 25 minutes at the max so I was doing over 200 probably 250 an hour but I did have the extra wad accesory that holds the wad guide down as you slide the bar across then I had the primer tray feeder plus extra tall bottles.

    Of course I would want to do it for a few hours at a setting but the little extra's makes it load faster.

    (note) ok I meant to say would not want to do it for a few hours at a time also I wasn't saying that I could do that many every hour but I have a few times but its been years ago

    Foghorn
     
  17. Shady Creek

    Shady Creek TS Member

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    Charlie,what is your zip code,if your close I'll put you into a 600 Jr for a bag of shot and I'll show you how to use it. GOOD LUCK
     
  18. omahasportingsupply

    omahasportingsupply TS Member

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    Started with a Texan purchased with paper route money. I feel that a single stage is the best way to start out. I have a 9000G, 4-600jrs, 2-700s, 1-650, 1-250, 1-PW800, and 1-Hornady 366. I loaded for years with single stage before I ever moved into the progressive loaders. Because of my knowledge gained from years with a single stage, I find it rather easy to troubleshoot (other people's or mine) loaders whether progressive or single. I have seen much more components spilled on progressive than single stage by a LLLLooooNNNGGG shot. You can usually buy a single stage at a reasonable price and when and if you are ready to move up, sell it to a new loader or kid and get most of your money back. I think the 600 vs the Grabber is a preference or supply issue as they both do a good job. If you are a hunter or need on 50 shells per week, I don't see the need for the progressive and vice versa. P.S. My first car was not a Corvette either since my paper route didn't pay that well.

    Yes, you should still reload if you want loads different from the store bought loads and you are not trying to pay yourself a salary on your time. I load Windjammer type wads, long distance wads, 1 oz, 1.1/8 oz, and 1.1/4 loads. Sometimes I put a LITTLE extra powder (from the powder Mgr. books) for my back fence loads. Sometime I use different shot sizes 7.5, 8, 8.5, & 9. This is why I reload. If I save some $$$, life is good! IMHO, No Flaming Intended, Your mileage and wad may fly farther.
     
  19. LWLarson

    LWLarson Member

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    I would have to see 200-250 an hour to believe it....

    I too averaged about 100-125 an hour. The best way to do it... Just knock primers out for a while... Sometimes thats all I would do in an evening. Then just put primers in for a while/night... That did make loading much faster when you start actually dropping powder/shot.

    LWL
     
  20. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I like the idea of starting with a MEC 600 Jr and I also believe it is a very good machine for the advanced reloader to have around. I know of nothing better to use for loading a box or two of a new test load that I want to try. I believe Neil Winston uses one often.

    Pat Ireland
     
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