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How many break down gun after every usage?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Luckyman, Apr 1, 2010.

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  1. Luckyman

    Luckyman Active Member

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    I have a BT-100 that I shoot use for singles Trap and was wondering how many of you break down their gun after every usage? Is it better to leave it assembled instead....Would the springs etc. last longer by just leaving it assembled unless it needs a thorough cleaning..
     
  2. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

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    I break down and clean my Beretta 682 after each shoot. Usually, I take out the trigger group after about 2000 rounds and flush it out with solvent and compressed air. Ed
     
  3. pdq

    pdq Member

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    Luckyman.

    I shoot a Silver Seitz. In good weather I shoot both Saturday & Sunday and Sunday afternoon break the gun down, clean and re-lube, then reassemble. I don't do anything with the trigger assembly, as per Rich at SS, it only needs to be cleaned / lubed every 5,000 shells. If I were to get caught in any type of rain on Saturday, I'd break the gun down as soon as I got home, else I wait until Sunday shooting is over.

    I go by the motto of "shoot zee gun, you clean zee gun".

    Pete
     
  4. jbmi

    jbmi Well-Known Member

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    I have to break down my Kolar everytime I'm done to put it back in it's case.
    Usually wipe off the grease, decock the triggers and wipe it down with a rag, run an oiled Outers Tico Tool down the barrel and chamber. Big cleaning comes before every big shoot.
     
  5. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    I'm going to pull rank here.. as I probably tear down and rebuild more guns in 13 days at the GRAND.. then many do in a lifetime.. I get to see the good.. the bad.. and the ugly..

    First.. the hinge pins must be lubed..and stay clean.. For MAXIMUM life.. use a little mineral spirits and a clean brush to wash off ALL old lube on the hinge pins..Then relube.. a pass on the locking bolt can't hurt either..

    Every now and then.. rinse the trigger assembly with mineral spirits and relube.. AND.. once or twice a year.. soak the entire receiver.. clean out the firing pin holes..and everything you can get to.. Blow it out with air.. and relube..


    Lube.. clean lube..removal of as much dirt and grime as you can will result in much longer life.. 3 lifetimes of lube and mineral spirits will cost you far less than just 1 set of hinge pins..

    Now.. This does NOT mean to totally disassemble a gun everytime you shoot..BUT.. a few times a year is productive for extended life.. All Good.. Mike
     
  6. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely! Breakdown, clean and store after every use.

    Lifelong habits are hard to break.

    MK
     
  7. Luckyman

    Luckyman Active Member

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    That is what I do as well....Thank you all for you responses....I will continue with my routine of breaking it down after use as it seems to have served me well to this point...I have had 0 issues with my BT and have many many rounds through it over the years...
     
  8. drh08

    drh08 TS Member

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    3-5 K requires a cleaning, I don't really touch it much before that, however I shoot an auto loader and not a break action gun. If the gun gets wet, it gets a good wipe down the same day however.
     
  9. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I take down my 682 after each trip to the range (must to case it) and wipe down all the surfaces with a lightly oiled cloth. The bores usually only get cleaned every month or so (about 2K rounds). I live in a dry climate where rust is not a problem, if you are in a high humidity area then a light coat of oil in the bores is a good idea.

    I wouldn't worry about the springs in your gun, they will probably outlast you.
     
  10. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Just like JBMI, I have to break down my 90T, its gets a Tico Tool, a boresnake if some residual wad fouling, a oil rag, a shot of RemOil in the chamber with a wooly snapcap and adios until the next time I take it out...

    regards all,

    Jay
     
  11. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    Does not the frequency of cleaning the bore and chamber depend somewhat upon the ammo shot? By that, I believe reloads create more fouling than factory.

    I believe it is the plastic from the wads that cause problems; plastic coats the bore and can trap moisture that in turn seals in moisture. Again, I find that factory rounds create much less residual debris from the wad.

    I wipe the gun down after each day on the outside and tico the bore. After about 400 rounds, pull gun apart and clean old lube off, brush the bore with solvent, relube and assmble. I feel that it is likely not needed as much, but in this case, a little precaution can't hurt and will prevent rusting/gauling.
     
  12. MTA Tom

    MTA Tom Active Member

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    PerazziBigBore has got it exactly right.
     
  13. ljutic73

    ljutic73 Well-Known Member

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    me.....clean and put back in the case until next time....
     
  14. threedeuces

    threedeuces TS Member

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    I must clean and re-lube my Kolar from head to toe every time after I shoot it. That way it is all pretty and shinny when it hits the range the next time out. Just one of them phobias I have but I think it is a good one. Every thing I own is as clean and new looking as the day it left the showroom. My wife thinks I am crazy most of the time but sure likes her new Mercedes Benz clean.
     
  15. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    BTW, anyone remember what Karl Lippard in his book re. Perazzi said to do to clean a gun? Sounded odd to me, but maybe not..
     
  16. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    I remember last year a almost new MX2000.. The locking bolt was so packed with dirty grease the chanel it rides in was about .010 oversized from a factory locking bolt.. Once cleaned..the bolt slopped around like a tennis ball in a garbage can.. Lucky for the owner..we had 1 vastly oversized bolt that we fitted.. The owner just kept forcing grease into the locking bolt.. Had they have just soaked the receiver out a few times that year..and properly oiled and greased the gun.. it had to be like new.. Today.. it's trash..unless the have a few oversized locking bolts saved for the next time..

    Mineral spirits.. it's cheap.. A Perazzi receiver is easily removed from the wood.. There is no reason for a gun to ever be that dirty..

    When I'm at the GRAND.. I'm happy to show anyone who cares to know.. HOW to properly clean and oil a Perazzi.. How to check firing pins... or anything else they want to know about keeping them running their best..

    Hope to see you all there... Mike
     
  17. Bill D.

    Bill D. Member

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    I shoot a Browning XT, break it down and clean it every time I shoot.
     
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