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how long does it take to reblue barrels

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by grntitan, Aug 23, 2010.

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  1. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    I think the actual bluing doesn't take long at all. I think the prep work on the barrel is most envolved.
     
  2. BT99

    BT99 Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    20 minutes in the cleaner, 15-20 minutes in the bluing tank.
     
  3. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    The bbl needs prep. They all do
     
  4. 6878mm

    6878mm Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Depends on the system used
    Hot caustic blue, 20mins
    express rust blue , about a day, that is with about 12-14 boilings
    Old English type blue twice a day for about 2weeks
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I could be done in one day, but it is not practical to set up and heat the bluing tanks for only one gun. Most people who are active in bluing will prep a dozen or so guns and then blue the batch with each gun hung on its own rods. It is easier than you might think to get parts mixed up and that makes reassembly a challenge.

    Pat Ireland
     
  6. victoria K

    victoria K Member

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    If you go to youtube.com and type in shotgun bluing you can watch videos on how its done and different types of bluing. Here is a couple examples

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  7. kiv-c

    kiv-c Member

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    If you are talking about a sXs, o/u, or a barrel with a vent rib, be aware that a trip through a hot blue tank will probably eat away the solder that holds it all together; especially older guns that were almost always held together with soft solder.

    Newer guns are soldered with solder that is composed of special alloys that resist salt blue. Some, like the Parker Repros, were brazed.

    The safest and best looking blue is an old time rust blue. Time consuming, though...

    Enclosed are a couple of pics of an old LC Smith Field Grade that I refurbished a few years back. I did the blueing and stock work, Turnbull did the recasing. Sorry, the pictures aren't that great; you'll have to take my word for it when I say that a rust blue is superior to a salt blue any time!
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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