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How important is trigger lock time?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by senior smoke, Apr 21, 2013.

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  1. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Hello:
    How important is trigger lock time? To my way of thinking, not much, as I feel you will adjust to even the slowest lock time.

    Years ago, Remington advertised the 3200 stating that it had the fastest lock time? I have only had one Perazzi, a Comp one, and it seemed like the shot was out the barrel noticeably faster than my 870 tb.

    It seemed to me that I had a learning period to adjust to the new gun and trigger especially on hard angles. I could never really shoot the gun well so I went back to the 870.

    What do you think, is lock time over rated? Do you agree, no matter the lock time you automatically adjust no matter if it's fast or slow?
    Steve Balistreri
     
  2. FlaLagarto

    FlaLagarto Well-Known Member

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    Some will tell you it's not important. Some will tell you it's extremely important.

    Once again like many things in trap shooting.. it's personal opinion!! It's what you get used to and are accustomed to.

    If your used to shooting a Remington 1100 and it breaks and your buddy loans you his Mack 1.. good luck !!
     
  3. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    I'm with FlaLagarto. I prefer faster lock times because things look more natural and I shoot better. That being said, the only time it really matters is when you change guns. It takes a while to adjust to the new lock speed.
     
  4. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    Another gimmick to sell guns.
     
  5. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    Trigger lock time on a shotgun is about as important as the color of the recoil pad unless you happen to be using an external hammer gun.

    Of course, trigger pull weight and trigger travel are far more important factors.

    Easystreet
     
  6. ysr_racer

    ysr_racer Active Member

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    >>igger lock time on a shotgun is about as important as the color of the recoil pad...

    Everyone knows it's spacer color, not recoil pad color, that's important.
     
  7. SMOKEIT

    SMOKEIT Well-Known Member

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    Lock time may not matter..but...Ever hear of anyone buying a gun beceause it had a slow lock time?
     
  8. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    slow locktime = built-in lead
     
  9. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    Fast lock time with fast shells little of no lead.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  10. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    Old Cowboy, would you mind explaining that?
     
  11. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    I think the quality of the trigger pull is more important. A bad trigger will cause you to flinch, and that WILL cause you to miss, then miss again.
     
  12. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    There is no way a contest in locktime between a 1100-870 to a Seitz, Mach One, Alfermann, Perazzi, K-80, KS-5, KX-5, CG, Blaser, the shot is out of the barrell before the !!00 or 870 Hammer hits the primer.

    Is that enough of a comparasion.

    The lead on an angle target is less with the latter guns.

    Hope this explains it, it's what you are used to, but switching from 1100 & 870
    to the latter guns is a learning expierence.


    Gary Bryant
    DR.longshot
     
  13. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    Less?

    Neil
     
  14. DJSims

    DJSims Member

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    Try a Browning Recoiless if you want an example of slooooowwwwww lock time!

    Doug Sims
     
  15. SKB-Eric

    SKB-Eric Member

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    I'll use 2 of my guns and an easy to picture target - on station 3 with a dead up the middle straight away target.


    Browning Recoilless and an SKB 85TSS - both set at 80 over 20 pattern


    With the recoilless, I cover the clay and shoot - By the time the extra few 100's of a second pass that is normal for this gun to fire, the clay which is still rising, meets the shot pattern that was aimed above the target when I pulled the trigger. (remember it is 80-20)

    If I shot the same way with the SKB, covering the clay, I would miss over the top or dust the top of the clay. With the SKB I need to place the clay on top of my front bead to get a good hit and not cover it.

    I can switch between guns but there is a little bit of relearning needed to compensate for the slow fire of the recoilless.

    Eric
     
  16. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    It is important that the lock time of the trigger matches the lock time of your brain. It is also important that the lock time is consistant from shot to shot. HMB
     
  17. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    Neil, even though a self proclaimed IQ of 120, I suspect Longshot types faster than he thinks.

    I would use the same lead regardless of gun.
     
  18. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    Johnny, it depends on the relative speed the gun has"across the sky" relative to the same measure of the bird.

    Case #1, Gun slower than the bird. Maybe something like the "spot shooting" we read about here a couple of weeks ago. In this case, a faster lock time would need less lead.

    Case #2. Sustained lead. Popular in skeet. for example. No difference in required lead between faster and slower lock-times, since the gun and bird are stepping across the sky as a unit.

    Case #3. The gun is moving faster across the sky than the bird. The so called "swing through" method and it's the way most trapshooters shoot most of the time, I think. Here the faster lock-time requires (mathematically, if not "practically") more lead.

    It's really easy to get things backwards (and I may have above, but I don't think so). Give it some thought.

    A profitable head-clearing tactic is to think that you are shooting a side-by-side .22 with different lock-times on the two sides.

    Neil
     
  19. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    Tron,

    Neil Winstons "Case #3" explains well what I was trying to say.
     
  20. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    Neil, you are over thinking it. Once the primer ignites, the lead required to hit the target is the same for every gun, given the same circumstances. The differences you speak of come into play before the primer ignites.
     
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