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how ft square in a 1/2 acre

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by maclellan1911, Aug 12, 2007.

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  1. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    aprox 20,000
     
  2. ClaySmoke

    ClaySmoke Member

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    1/2 acre is 21,750 sq ft.

    Garrett
     
  3. Chipshot

    Chipshot TS Member

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    Looks like you need to figure the perimeter (linear feet) of the yard being fenced and not the area (square feet). The perimeter, assuming a rectangle shaped yard, would be 2 times the length plus 2 times the width.

    Bob
     
  4. dmarbell

    dmarbell Active Member

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    43,560 square feet to the acre. 590 linear feet of fencing for a half acre is correct only if the lot is square. If the lot is 435.60 x 50.00, that's still 21,780 sq ft, but it's 971.20 linear feet. To be sure, you have to look at your plat or measure your lot.

    Danny
     
  5. dmarbell

    dmarbell Active Member

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    Not to beat this to death with math:

    200x100= 20,000 sq feet and 600 linear feet

    400x50= 20,000 sq feet and 900 linear feet

    141.42x141.42= 20,000 sq feet and 565.68 linear feet

    1x20,000= 20,000 sq feet and 40,002 linear feet

    Danny
     
  6. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    An acre (US) is 43560 square feet regardless of the shape of the tract. The parameter of an acre tract can vary depending on the shape of the tract. I look at several plats made from surveys each day. I find very few of them that are rectangles.

    If you do not have a copy of the plat of your land, it is relatively simple to get one. One section of your deed will typically be indented from the rest of the deed. This is the property description. This section will give the direction and length or each side of your lot. The second from the last line in this description will reference your plat (eg. plat book 40-page 87, or another deed that contains the plat). If you go to the court house and ask for some help, someone will check your deed and make a copy of your plat.

    SPECIAL NOTE- only to lawyers. I hate it when you record a deed and simply state that the plat is recorded but do not mention where it is recorded.

    Pat Ireland
     
  7. willing

    willing Member

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    Pat
    Perimeter,or just a slip of the keyboard?

    Bill
     
  8. JBrooks

    JBrooks TS Member

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    You need a tape measure.
     
  9. flyfishinfool

    flyfishinfool TS Member

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    Where are all the old timey land people and surveyors when we need them ?

    1 rod (16.5 feet) x 4 = 1 chain (66 feet)

    1 chain x 1 chain = 1/10 acre (4356 sq feet)

    1 chain x 10 chains = 1 acre (43,560 sq feet)

    20 chains x 20 chains = 40 acres

    80 chains x 80 chains = 1 Section (640 acres)

    13 of my paces (not steps) = 1 chain

    20 years ago when I was a practicing dirt forester I could pace out a 40 acre tract and would within 5-10 feet from the old survey corner which was typically a pile of rocks or blazed tree. Keep in mind that land is measured by horizontal distance. If you are going uphill or down hill you need to make a Kentucky windage type adjustment at the end to properly estimate horizontal distance.

    The art of compass & pacing is being lost because of those darn GPS units out there that makes anyone an expert in estimating distances. Don't own one and never will.

    And yes - I still think Model 12's and Remington 31's are state of the art guns !

    Dan
     
  10. lumper

    lumper TS Member

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    Ok ... what if it was pie shaped in the front coming to a point and in the back it was only 20' wide with an eliptical arc with 5' rise in across the back of the property ... now what would the outside perimeter be fence?
     
  11. jbshep

    jbshep Member

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    Count the number of cows and multiply by four!
     
  12. Steve NJ

    Steve NJ Member

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  13. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Dan- I find the corners of a tract much like you do. I have much practice with my 1 yard per step pace. I do need to use an old compass to keep going is a somewhat straight line and in the correct direction. I also hate it when I find a boundary tree that has been cut down.

    I have put up nice yellow metal boundary markers on my land. They say boundary- No hunting without permission and my telephone number. When I am looking at someone else's land, they just get a red ribbon.

    Pat Ireland
     
  14. Pull Bang

    Pull Bang Member

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    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    1/2 acre = 21,780 sq ft.

    Ref URL above.


    Frank
     
  15. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    Lumper. two times the radius and the ratio of the arc to the total circumference added on. in other words, double it and add a rod!
     
  16. KelleyPLK

    KelleyPLK TS Member

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    1 acre = 43560 sg ft * 2=21780 exactly !

    WileyE Coyote Ph.D
     
  17. oldgahchamp

    oldgahchamp Active Member

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    Dan, You mention rods and chains. Did you forget links? Larry
     
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