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How Can You Fix This Flinch???

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Justin L., May 21, 2007.

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  1. Justin L.

    Justin L. Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    A friend of mine is a right handed shooter and he is flinching with his left hand. Anyone have any ideas of how to fix this other than a release forend??? Thanks in advance...
     
  2. 90T3200

    90T3200 TS Member

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    Jan 11, 2007
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    Duct tape his fingers together so his hand is flat and he can't squeeze the crap out of the fore-end and jerk it down.

    Left hand of a righty shot is supposed to only be for support only.
     
  3. WarEagle2017

    WarEagle2017 Active Member

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    Release Trigger, I had the same problem, what is happening is """ in the process of pulling the trigger ---your subconsious mind takes control and in the course of LOCK TIME you subconcious mine causes you left hand to make a last mil. second adjustment while moving the gun to the target and you end up with a jerking motion at the last and MOST critical second. A release trigger fixed this problem for me.
     
  4. Mac V

    Mac V Guest

    Dry-firing with a snap cap can retrain the brain so that the left hand stops reacting to the anticipated recoil. Ask a bunch of right-handed shooters to dry fire at a target and most of them will flinch with the left hand because they are anticipating the recoil. A month or so of daily dry fire drills will help most of them.

    Mike
     
  5. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

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    I have battled the dreaded flinch for almost 3 years. I tried everything. I lightened the trigger pull, I made the trigger pull heavier, I practiced dry firing, changed my grips, used very light loads and on and on. My scores were suffering so much, I wanted to just quit shooting. Then several fellow shooters and a number of respondents on this site finally convinced me to try a release trigger. I just can't believe the difference. No flinches and my scores have been the best they have been in many years. I always said if I ever had to resort to a release, I would quit shooting. That was a very dumb statement. The release has made shooting fun again. Ed
     
  6. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I've found most flinches to be the result of a lack of visual connection with the target. If your brain is unsure of the alignment of the gun and target, it is unwilling to issue the "fire" command to your trigger finger. Jerking the gun down is a good tipoff that your brain thinks the gun is in the way and wants it moved. Most shooters who flinch from recoil just can't pull the trigger - aside from possibly taking a step toward the trap house, there are no acrobatics or extreme gun movements involved.

    Try lowering your gun hold point. That improves your chances of seeing the target well and gives your brain longer to get locked onto it.

    If recoil was the only reason for a flinch, release triggers would only be a temporary cure for one because your brain is smart enough to realize that releasing that thing causes the same discomfort that pulling it used to. And if it was, release trigger users would never flinch. They do, but not nearly as much as they did with a pull trigger. I'm one of them and each and every time I flinch, I jerk the gun down. If I lower my gun hold point, I stop flinching every time.

    It costs a lot less to try a lower hold point than a release trigger!

    Having said all that, I will add that I like a release and feel that they have made me a smoother shooter. I never stop the gun because of tightening a muscle to shoot. Instead, I relax a muscle and flow through the targets much better. But I went to one as a knee-jerk reaction to a flinch that started suddenly and happened six times on one trap right after I broke 24 of the targets on the previous trap very well. But that was 13 years ago and among many other things relevant to trapshooting, I didn't understand the importance of a good visual connection with the target back then.

    Ed
     
  7. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

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    AveragEd: I also agree that it makes a person much smoother and allows a person to "follow through" on the angle targets. Not only was I flinching with the pull trigger; I would "poke" at the targets instead of swinging through them. Although I'm a rookie with the release trigger, ( I have shot 200 targets so far); I did flinch once and I know it was because I lost visual contact with a very sharp angle target. Ed
     
  8. dennis (nj)

    dennis (nj) Guest

    I have a left hand flinch but I happen to push the gun up instead of pulling it down . Trigger flinched 2 times so that wasn`t my main problem . I went to a release and it solved 95% of the flinches but I noticed I still had a flinch with my left hand . I then went to a very tight grip on both hands , pulling the gun tight into my shoulder . Stopped the flinch --- as long as it`s a very tight grip . Forgetting this once and I will flinch so this is 180* from what they teach you to do . Works for me so I do it everytime !!! If I rest the forend in my palm I`m almost throw the gun in the air . Everyone has a different flinch and unfortunately , some people don`t know they flinch . Try a tight grip , if that doesn`t work , go for a release and work from there .
     
  9. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    Why is he fliniching? Is he shooting heavy target or handicap loads? Try the AA low recoilloads if that's is problem. I shoot the low recoils out of my SKB O/U and it helps no more flinch
     
  10. jakearoo

    jakearoo Active Member

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    Of course, a release trigger is the answer to a flinch.
    But he should also use some hand position which does NOT grip the forearm. If you watch many good shooters you will see that they noticably open their front hand when the gun us first mounted in preparing to shoot. Hell, if he has to balance it on his knuckles so be it. There should be NO pressure in the front hand. Jake
     
  11. Justin L.

    Justin L. Member

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    Sorry it took me so long to get back to you guys, but thanks, I'll pass the advice onto my buddy.
     
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