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Hornady 366

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by grntitan, Jul 9, 2009.

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  1. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    I just purchased a 366 loader that is actually a Pacific 366. I was wondering if the Hornady 366 parts interchange with it and where is the best place to buy parts for this loader? I am also going to need bushings, any suggestions on where to get them? I am a MEC person but thought i would play with something new. Are these as easy to setup and load with?----Matt
     
  2. midalake

    midalake Well-Known Member

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    I have a Pacific 366, and loaded on it yesterday in fact. It is a good reloader. Makes a quality shell. I would make sure the primer seating is correct and set every other station off of that. Also breakout the blue thread locker and lock all of your threads down. The loader does have the ability to loosen up. It is a little difficult to clear the rack of shells without making a mess; I leave shells on the rack during the loading season. I got my loader with many bushings and parts. I have not broke anything so I have never needed parts, I am sure someone here knows a supplier. I also am pretty sure the Hornady 366 interchanges.

    GS
     
  3. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Most top end parts will interchange between the Pacific and the Hornady versions. You can get all the parts through Hornady, bushings included. If you have a lot of the MEC powder bushings, get an adaptor or make one by boring out a hornady bushing. Also get some spare primer drop fingers and wad guides.

    You will like the quality and quantity of ammo that the 366 makes. A lot of guys here use them so don't be shy about asking questions as you go through your learning curve.
     
  4. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Hornady fully supports the 366. You can repair/upgrade the unit as needed by contacting them in NE.

    Regards to all,

    Jay
     
  5. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Best place to get parts and bushings is directly from Hornady.

    If you have a local gun shop that sells Hornady bushings, you might get a slightly better price.

    Call Hornady and ask them for an owner's manual. They'll send you one free (at least they did for me.) The link to a manual on their website is just a blown-up diagram of the reloader, and is not the owner's manual. If you can't get one from them, I'll scan mine and e-mail it to you.

    Their customer service is pretty good. They're usually pretty prompt responding to e-mails (I think you have to post your questions on their website.)

    I loaded 100 shells in 20 minutes on mine this morning before work. And I resize every hull on the resizing station.

    Easy to set up? I'd say no on that. It takes a bit of tinkering to get it right. But follow the instruction manual. Once you get it close, they're not difficult to "tweak" to get things right.

    A lot of people recommend getting the spring loaded primer seater. I haven't had any problems seating primers, so I don't have that accessory.

    Do yourself a favor and get a couple spare wad fingers, a new "primer feed stop (the little plastic thing on the end of the primer drop tube...they get brittle over time) and a couple of spare pawls to have on hand.

    I also made a larger diameter shot hopper so I can load a full 25 lb bag at one time. There are a couple of guys on this site who market larger diameter hoppers for the 366.

    The thing is built like a tank, and will last a long time.

    Don't use much force on the up-stroke if it jams, otherwise you'll be replacing pawls a lot.

    Oh, and on the up-stroke, make sure you go sloooow when the primer is being dropped into the primer seating station. If you don't it can become jammed.
     
  6. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    As midalake said, be real careful about when you open and close the powder slide and the shot slide.

    Until you're really tuned in to doing that, you can spill a lot of shot and powder.

    One guy who posts here has put a baking pan under all his reloaders. Probably not a bad idea until you get accustomed to the machine.

    Also, I got a "bent" handle from a guy who sells parts called "basic design machine." Less stress on your arm with this handle.
     
  7. Jeff P

    Jeff P Well-Known Member

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    Timb99...curious about the handle!!! i have three of the machines, but all with factory handles. Is the bent one worth it?

    I can load 500 an hour on mine if I'm not distracted and everything is going good.

    The only good tip I have is when you're finished reloading the primers can continue to drop if the tube isn't empty. Solve that by, obviously, loading until the primer tube is out, OR just take a primer and turn it upside down and stick it back up the tube they come out. the fingers on the drop will grab the rim and not release it on the downstroke, so you stop dropping primers. When you're done, pop it out,turn it over and put it back in the tube and you're ready to go for next time...
     
  8. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys for the help. I called hornady this morning and got an instruction manual for trhe 366. The lady i talked to was very nice and helpful. I can see that this will be a fun project with all the help here and from Hornady itself. I like to tinker as well as load shells so this ought to kill to birds with one stone so to speak.----Matt
     
  9. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Hey Tim, is that bent handle the same lenght as stock or is it longer for increased leverage? Now you got me thinking about making one....
     
  10. Ljutic111

    Ljutic111 TS Member

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    Jeff , your primer release tip is bad . They shouldn`t continue to drop out .
     
  11. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Jeff, Wolfram,

    I sure like it. It is longer than the factory handle.

    I think he wants $35 for it.

    He's also one of the guys that sells the extra volume hoppers.

    Tim
     
  12. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Jeff, you're kicking my backside. I can get 300 an hour, or a little more, if I'm "in the zone."

    I do have that extra step since I resize each hull, though.
     
  13. Jeff P

    Jeff P Well-Known Member

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    LOL...IF (and I don't usually) resize...it's probably closer to 400, 425. but if I don't resize, 500 is pretty easy. I can do closer to 600 in a pinch, IF (big IF) nothing bad happens...anything like running out of hulls, spilling shot, having to go retreive more powder, having a wad not seat right, and that's right out the window. 'Course, I've been running one since 1979, 30 years oughta teach me something.

    Ljutic111...I don't understand what you mean by my tip is "bad". Perhaps what is more likely here is that I'm not explaining it well. First off, I have a very old loader - 1979, as noted - and it doesn't have all the fancy upgrades. Isn't there a primer shutoff available now?

    Anyway...if you have a full tube of primers (holds about 75 on my machine), and you decide to quit loading, you have to pull the handle 6 more times to clear the shells out of the machine - turning off the powder as the last shell passes that station, then putting the last wad in, dropping shot and then shut the shot off (big mess, LOL, if you forget), and then run those last few shells out through the crimp stations and down the hole into the big box.

    So, as you're emptying the machine...everytime you pull the handle, won't a primer drop?

    But there's no hulls coming into the machine, so there's no place for the primers to go. I used to just pull them out and set them on the bench, but it's a lot easier to just put one 'upside down' in the bottom of the primer tube - that keeps the tube from dropping any more primers. As the primer makes contact with the base of hte loader, the rim stays up inside the fingers, and on the upstroke, the fingers grab that rim and pull the rimer back up in the tube.

    hope that helps....i got that tip right on this site. works for me.
     
  14. StonewallRacing

    StonewallRacing Well-Known Member

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    I inherited my PACIFIC 366 from my father-in-law who said it was made in about 1972??

    I have pulled the handle over 15,000 times in last two years on top of the hundred thousand plus of rounds he said it has loaded in 35 years.

    I replaced the pawl and the shell plate because I bent it.... I did put a new spring in the primer seat. I also bought a few spare wad fingers and a crimp starter just to have around, but have not put them in.

    I think this is a great loader. It's built like a brick $hithouse.

    After I dumped shot all over the workbench the first time I tried to change the bushings, I got smart and I can change over 1oz to 1-1/8oz in about 2 minutes now.

    400 per hour on one oz loads is easy if you keep an eye on the primer drop. With my son helping 500 is attainable.

    If I was rich I'd buy a Spolar. A. I'm not rich and B. 7,500 a year is easy on the 366.

    You can pick these things up for $250 to $300 every couple weeks here used. It's steal because you will not wear it out.

    SW
     
  15. whosyourdaddy

    whosyourdaddy Member

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    I have an older Pacific 366. You have to rotate the shell plate manually. I have loaded approximately 500 shells a week on it for the last 10 years and only replaced a couple wad fingers and primer stops. These are truly well designed high quality machines. I loaded with Mec loaders 20 years before aquiring the Pacific. I have 3 Pacific/Hornady reloaders now. I will never own another Mec.
     
  16. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    Hornady can supply everything you need to update your machine to the equivalent of a brand new machine.

    One of the first updates I did was the Automatic Finished Shell Eject. This requires you to send the machine back to Hornady. They replace the lower platen (casting). It is worth the effort and the very moderate expense. It speeds up loading tremendously. This update also includes the automatic turret advance and swing-out wad guide. Now all you need to do is place an empty hull and a wad in the appropriate places and pull the handle.
     
  17. Basicdesignmachine

    Basicdesignmachine TS Member

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    For do it yourself guys. I've used this as a cheap easy way to shutoff the primer drop. drill a .08 hole in the primer drop tube about 1/2" above the primer release foot. Slip a brad or pop rivit into the hole to stop the primer drop. Make sure the hole you drill is deburred or the primers will hang up on it.
     
  18. miner1

    miner1 Member

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    Sounds like you have all the info you need and more, but here is a couple of items>FYI.

    I purchased mine in 1987. It is red in color (I think Pacific is green)? Mine has Pacific logo on the spent primer container and Hornady on most of the machine. This is a 'mechanical loader' meaning it is a work horse but you have to have some patience and ability to tweak. For the heavey equipment guys out there it's like a Detroit Diesel compared to CAT or Cummins--no frills. I have found parts easy to find including Sportsmans Warehouse for bushings, Midway USA for just about anything you need, Hornady factory etc. If you 'run over' some shot spilled in the loader you could bend the shell plate a bit. I flattended mine back into shape with a hammer but eventually bought a new one from Midway USA. The new spring loaded primer seat would be nice as there is quite a difference between hulls sometimes. Well enough, you should be able to match and replace parts between Hornady and Pacific easily.

    Shoot well and good luck.

    Miner
     
  19. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Miner---You said the Pacific models are green and Hornady red. This one is red with Pacific Tool Co. clearly cast into the base casting and Pacific Model 366 on the head casting. Which model does this make mine?----Matt
     
  20. Jeff P

    Jeff P Well-Known Member

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    really, really, REALLY old pacifics are BLUE. Pacifics from the 70s are red, and then Hornady bought them out.

    Mine, from 1979, are red. All blued steel dies, too. Not the aluminum they have today.
     
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