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Hornady 366 Question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Powerhouse, Sep 15, 2010.

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  1. Powerhouse

    Powerhouse Member

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    Is there an easy way to check the powder drop on a Hornady 366. I really didn't want to have to remove all the casings from the carosel. Also how does one change the powder bushing if your load isn't right? At this point, I'm really ready to listen. Thanks
     
  2. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Well i usually spot check on mine by actually cutting random shells apart after they are complete. By doing it that way you get the actual powder/shot weights by letting the machine operate thru all its fuctions which can change the amount in the drops. In other words when the machine has a shell in each position, it reads different than if you just go thru the first three and then powder drop. The first few shells to come off the line always read different than the ones when the machine is full. There is also some who have cut the shell holding rim with a hacksaw in only the powder drop position to allow of removal the shell for spot checking. "doggai" on here has done the cutting with a hacksaw and he told me it works great for spot checking. Its my next project.----Matt
     
  3. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    I run a 20ga hull through mine when I check my powder drops. This way I can just pull it out and check it.

    Changing bushings is easy. First of all, don't fill hoppers above quarter full until you have everything like you want it. Secondly, just remove the assembly and turn upside down. I generally will support the caps when I turn it over. Remove plate and change bushings. Then reinstall assembly and your done.

    Just take your time and pay attention to things.

    ss
     
  4. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    As "SS" stated, its easy for bushing changes if your shot tube is NOT full. I too support the lids and turn upside down to change. I can actually swap bushings in less than 2 minutes and be loading again. I use some wood blocks to support the lids on my bench to prevent the disasterous powder/shot mixture spill. Don't ask me how i know about this mishap.---Matt


    SS---Good idea on the 20ga hull. I marked that one down for trial. Thanks
     
  5. OregonDon

    OregonDon TS Member

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    My problem was with powder drops of nothing. I can put my little finger in the hull to be sure powder was dropped. Don
     
  6. Craig12

    Craig12 TS Member

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    I took a once fired hull and ground the brass lip down even with the hull.
    I can check powder and shot anytime I want by just sitting it in there and pull it back out.
    Skip putting a hull in one station and sit it in there when it gets under the powder drop. 2 pulls later check the shot with the same hull.
     
  7. Jeff P

    Jeff P Well-Known Member

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    Craig...thst's a hell of an idea.

    I like the 20 guage case idea too...
     
  8. unckiebub

    unckiebub Member

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    Here is the manual in a PDF file. Click on Web Link or follow it here>>> http://www.hornady.com/assets/files/manuals-current/shotshell-reloading/366_loader.pdf
     
  9. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I do what Don does to verify I am getting powder only I use a short pencil not my little finger to check the powder depth in the hull.

    If you just want to do a spot check on the actual weight, just skip feeding a new hull in on a sequence and catch the powder drop in the cap from the powder tube. Remember there is no shell present when you come around to the shot drop tube so you will need to turn the shot off at that time.
     
  10. Greg LV

    Greg LV Member

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    Take an Al cigar tube cut it to 2.5" slip it over the drop tube cycle the press and dump the powder on the scale pan. Works great on a PW.
     
  11. Powerhouse

    Powerhouse Member

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    Thanks for the tips guys. After using MECs for 30 years, this is the first shot with the 366. I'm also gonna watch the ahndle pull and release speed! Already been warned about the upstroke. Thanks again.
     
  12. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    My transition from MEC to 366 was less than graceful. Actually I wanted to throw it into the pond several times.
    Here are some thoughts that may help.
    Put a refill mark on the tubes 3-4" from the bottom and religously refill shot and powder when it falls to that level.
    I used a thin cut-off wheel to cut windows into the brass primer tubes to tell me when running low.
    Having an air compressor hose nearby to blow away spills.
    Limit distractions so that you can focus on the machine and loading process.
    I am very gentle on both up and down strokes, as everything that you feel thru that handle means something. Listen to the machine and feel it thru the handle. Constantly move your eyes around the machine to watch the process for signs of problems.
    For my limited attention span some background music is OK but conversing with someone is probably not, at least not at the first sign of a problem.
    Once they are running well they really are nice machines, I now use 2 of them. But learning them was brutal, at least for me.
    I do enjoy hearing other loaders' experiences and suggestions and steal the ideas.
    dju
     
  13. Jeff P

    Jeff P Well-Known Member

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    Powerhouse...

    the only real trick to the upstroke is a little pause, a hitch, whatever you want to call it, to let the primer drop into the hole at the second station. If you go too fast, you'll catch the primer with the plate before it can drop into the hole and bind things up.

    Start the upstroke, and as the plate turns, you'll see the primer start to fall. Once that starts, hold on for a split second until it settles.

    100 shells should get you in the groove - you'll naturally develop a (very) short pause in the upstroke at the right spot to let the primer fall. Once you're in sync with the machine, you can easily do 500 an hour. I can do close to 600 if I'm really in the zone and things are working well....
     
  14. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Jeff P---I about pulled my hair out when i first got my Pacific until i figured out that short pause. Now i'm like you and when all is going smooth 500 is easy and closer to 600 easily obtainable. I made my own shot tube that holds slightly over a bag of shot. I have a mark on my powder tube and it matches my shot use. Now combined with my counter i know when its time to re-fill and i can make real quick re-fills and keep the system running. The primer refill is usually the slowest part of the re-fill process.---Matt
     
  15. Powerhouse

    Powerhouse Member

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    Thanks again guys, GREAT tips. Now, could somebody explain the swapping of primer tubes? Are you saying you have extra copper tubes that you preload and then just change them out. Brilliant! Believe me, I am all ears. I hope the tips keep on coming.
     
  16. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Powerhouse---The small curtain rods that are about the same size as the Hornady primer tubes work great for making pre-loaded primer re-fill tubes. I use small corks to plug the ends and have them ready to go. When its re-fill time i hold up by the primer tube pull cork and slip over the primer tube and let em go. Cut them to a length that holds exactly the same amount as your primer tube on your machine.-----Matt
     
  17. Jeff P

    Jeff P Well-Known Member

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    I might have to try that. How do you get the primers in the curtain rod, though?

    One thing I do is, before I dump a tray of primers in the filler, take a heavy permanent black marker and 'color' the end of the primer - where the pin strikes - for handicap shells. I load ounce for singles with plain primers, ounce and an eighth for handicap with 'black' primers. I did some 7/8th ounce to try for the first shot of doubles with 'green' primers.

    Easy way to mark the hulls, and once you deprime, you can do whatever you want with it...
     
  18. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Jeff-I usually load several tubes by hand before i start loading and have them all ready. I am playing with making a tube that will adapt the factory primer tray to the curtain rods to maybe speed up the re-fill tube loading. I'm pretty efficiant loading them by hand though. It may take time at the start but once the loading starts it more than makes up for the time spent in my mind anyway. I can't take credit for this though, this was "doggai's" idea. When it comes to the 366 he is the Divinci of inventions for it. LOL-----Matt
     
  19. sasquach

    sasquach Member

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    I make tubes out of clear plastic hose and suspend one end from a nail in floor joist. Cut primer tube into 4" pieces and drill 1\8 inch hole for cotter pin about 2" from end. Deburr and insert in plastic hose. You can make them any length acording to your ceiling height. Keep the last piece of tube that fits in primer tray and use it to fill hose. I fill up two or three of these before I start and change as needed. You can see through the hose and tell how many you have left. I welded a lock washer big enough to go over the nail head on to the head of a bolt to hang it with. Couple small hose clamps and that's it.
     
  20. Powerhouse

    Powerhouse Member

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    You guys are amazing. I guess it's true that necessity is the mother of invention. I stand in awe of your contraptions. What else you got?

    Jim
     
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