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High rib means head held more upright???

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by luvtrapguns, Apr 26, 2013.

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  1. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

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    I frequently read on TS where shooters are claiming a high rib gun will allow you to hold your head more upright. I suppose this is true if you make no stock changes. It seems to me the head upright position is more a function of rib to comb relationship. For instance, take a gun that you have to crawl into to get your desired sight picture. Now lower the comb with no change of rib and your head will be more upright to achieve the same sight picture. Once you have an ideal sight picture/comb setting/head position, raising the rib should make very little difference, even if you raised it several inches, as long as you raised the comb the same amount. Of course the recoil pad will now be lower on your chest and will require adjustment. The only benefits of a high rib that seem to make sense is that you lower the receiver from your sight lines allowing a quicker acquisition of target plus some relief from heat mirage. What am I missing? Marc
     
  2. Idahobill

    Idahobill Member

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    The thing you are missing is that some of us have long necks and have trouble lifting our head of the stock a high rib and comb takes care of that problem. Bill
     
  3. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    <blockquote><I>"Of course the recoil pad will now be lower on your chest and will require adjustment."</I></blockquote>You can raise both the comb and the rib without moving the recoil pad from it's normal position or from your accustomed shoulder pocket.

    The face may tend to move back on the stock as the comb is raised higher and something may need to be done to the stock length to allow the face to stay close to the end of the receiver. I've seen shooters with high rib/high comb guns shooting with their heads almost at the back end of the comb, very close to the recoil pad. Very awkward to shoot with your head back on the end of the stock.

    Some shooters try to accomplish the same thing by lowering the recoil pad without changing the height of the comb or the rib but that may cause face bashing problems.

    Keller
     
  4. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    Keller has it right. I would like to drop my recoil pad even more than I do now to get that head up position but if I try that I'm gonna get bumped in the cheek because now my barrel bore axis is too high relative the heel of the stock and it will rotate up. The only way for me to accomplish this would be a high rib Unsingle gun and that might cause me some crossfire problems that I don't need. This is speculation but would be an expensive experiment to find out for sure. As noted before on several threads the Top Bunker shooters have their head down and into the stock.
     
  5. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    The erectness of the head and neck are most commonly affected by three things: 1) the length of the shooter's neck, 2) the height of the gun mount and 3), the distance of the top of the recoil pad below the level of the rib ("drop at the heel" stock dimension).

    Take a normal gun and raise the comb AND the rib and you will shoot with a more erect head and neck.

    Lower the recoil pad using a pad adjuster on a normal gun and you will be able to shoot with a more erect head and neck but, as was suggested above, will cause increased barrel rise during recoil, and when considerable, can invite cheek slap.

    Un-guns that have the upper barrel on over and under replaced with a rib, will not allow shooting with a more erect head and neck posture;

    Low gun mounts compound the problem of having to lean the neck forward to put the cheek on the comb and often require shooting with the eyes looking through the tops of shooting lenses rather than through their lower optical centers.

    Shooting with the neck leaned forward to put the cheek on the comb requires (as was stated above) a longer stock because the lean requires additional stock length to keep the nose away from the trigger-hand thumb. Neck lean also promotes head-raising during swings because it is both uncomfortable and unnatural and this tends to be corrected unconsciously during swings.

    Rollin
     
  6. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    Idahobill , A long neck is the only reason for a high rib. I can't get low enough on most guns to keep from seeing a ramp so I have bring the rib up to my eye. If a super high rib was the natural way to go then that is what we would have had from the start. Another attempt to reinvent the wheel and sell more guns.
     
  7. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    As Rollin commented, several factors are involved.

    One not mentioned I feel is pertinent is initially basics and info given to an individual by local club members. This dam figure 8 crap is as relevant as 3 drams. Yet I still here usage commonly given.

    Many new trapshooters are from the field and try to sight a shotgun and in large, hunker down on it like a rifle.

    With either do to body design they end up with bent over neck. If taught properly or listen to someone that might know, a high rib is not necessary for them in order to have better/more efficient target recognition.

    If you go down the route of "it keeps them from lifting their head", proper mounting/where to hold on trap house prior to call/gun fit/reduced loads all have a roll here.
     
  8. build4u

    build4u Member

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    I shot a 90T high rib for a while and switched to an MX200RS a few years back. The ability to hold my head more erect gave me a much better visual on the target. Having your face buried behind the reiever is bad. It also keeps me from rolling my head down which forces me to look through the wrong spot in my glasses. The unsingle barrel is very pleasent for recoil as well with the gun being lighter than the 90T.I tell everyone I feel like I am cheating with that gun it helped me a lot. When I put on my doubles barrel I do not have to change a thing. The rib is not as tall but I have the same sensation. At 6 feet 180 I am not a pencil neck and I am not a no neck. I have a bunch of sporting guns and I want to try a sporting with the slightly taller rib, people should not knock what does not work for them. I watced some you tube the other day with doubles Championships and they were all shooting tall ribs and taller.
     
  9. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    It is not the high rib so much that allows a more uprigh head posture but the chenge in the style of the stock - the fact that it does not angle down as much as other stocks.

    The same change in neck posture AND the the eye sees along the rib can be achieved with a standard stock and the installation of a pad adjuster such as the 100-Straight or better yet, the Nelson Pad-Adjuster.

    These adjusters allow the recoil pad to be lowered. With the same gun mount and the pad lowered, the rib is raised, the neck is erect for those who thought they needed a high-rib gun, they can see along the rib the way they prefer.

    For others, just raising the gun mount may achieve the same thing. It often has an additonal benefit by slightly reducing barrel rise during recoil. This is because a higher portion of the recoil pad, that is closer to the barrel axis, serves as the gun's pivot point during recoil. With the pivot point being closer to the barrel axis, barrel rise is automaticlly reduced. (This is a good reason to get the pitch on the stock corrected if the bottom "toe" sticks out too far and makes contact with the shoulder well befor the top "heel" when the gun is being mounted.)

    Rollin
     
  10. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    pheasantmaster , you apparently don't have a long neck so you don't really understand what a problem it causes. Can you teach me to shoot a gun that shoots 3ft high @ 40yds? The rib on most stock guns looks like a steep ramp. I don't care about a figure 8 but 10in high works a lot better for me than 3ft.

    Rollin, your idea of raising the stock would work for those that don't need any cast. For those ,me, that needs lots of cast, that does not work. I have trouble getting low enough on the stock so I use a custom stock. I am as close to the stock bolt hole as I can get. Being an average size, right handed person in this sport has it's advantages.
     
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