1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

High brass vs Low brass

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by GGPOST, Jun 26, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. GGPOST

    GGPOST Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    Messages:
    208
    I have placed a few posts on TS and have had great responses to my questions, especially on reloading, Thank you

    Yesterday however, I was told I was not shooting a "trap" load because of the wad and it was high brass hull. The hull is a new almost clear/white hull and you can see the wad color and style through it. I purchased them preprimed. It does reload and crimp very well. He told me a trap load is low brass only and because I was shooting high brass with the wrong style wad it was not a trap load. I told him it was a straight wall hull so I used a CB2118-12 pink colored wad which is designed for a straight wall hull only and that it looks differently than Remington or Winchester style wad. I explaind I loaded with 1 1/8 oz of #8 and 17.5 gr Promo. Once I convinced him the wad was correct for the hull, he was still adamant that it was not a "trap" load because of the high brass. My questions are does high brass affect the performance and if so, how much, and is there such as thing as a true "trap" load? Thanks
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,406
    The size of the shot, the weight of the shot, and the fps of the payload are the elements used to determine whether the shells are within the rules governing trap shooting. The height of the brass is irrelevant. HMB
     
  3. Remstar311

    Remstar311 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    942
    If they werent reloads then I would have questioned them too, although I don't care either way.

    HMB is right on.
     
  4. GGPOST

    GGPOST Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    Messages:
    208
    Thank guys, Thought so. Seemed simple enough but this guy has been shooting trap for a long time. Just made me question myself a little.
     
  5. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,328
    Location:
    S-E PA
    The brass portion of the shell essentially reinforces the area where the powder is stored, and hence ignited.

    "Low brass" implies a small powder charge (as in a light pay load trap load), and "high brass" implies a heavy powder load (as in a higher velocity, heavy pay load hunting load). This is typically so for factory loaded shells - why put more materials (brass is expensive) into the shell than you need?

    In terms of a reload, as hmb says, the final load and speed characteristics determines if it is a trap load or not...

    Most clubs have velocity limits on what you may shoot on their fields (1,300 fps is common) so seeing a 'high brass' shell might raise some eyebrows - especially in 'new' hulls that do not look to have been reloaded.
     
  6. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,538
    Location:
    Oxford MA
    "Seemed simple enough but this guy has been shooting trap for a long time."

    The length of time one shoots has nothing to do with the knowledge one accumulates. In this case high brass is unorthodox but not illegal.

    Bob Lawless
     
  7. Traders

    Traders Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,613
    Many trap clubs have limits on the kind of shells that can be used. The may prohibit, High Power, Magnum, Hunting Loads, powder loads above a certain limit, and High Brass. These limitations are based on the theory that the more powerful (more powder) the farther the shot will travel. In reality, it's just not true.

    For all practical purposes (within a few feet) the maximum distance that a pellet will travel is determined by pellet size. Period, The bigger the shot, for any given amount of powder, the farther it will travel. Once the maximum amount of powder is loaded, the shot will not go any farther. You can load a shell with as much powder as you want, the initial velocity out of the barrel will change, but for all practical purposes, the maximum distance traveled will not change.

    In relation to how far the shot will travel, the only shell limitation that makes any sense is shot size. Period. While it may be counterintuitive, the calculation is done with a formula called Journee's Formula. You can find further information in"Understanding Firearm Ballistics" by Robert Rinker.
     
  8. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    902
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Always certain, seldom Correct category of gun club member

    God Love 'em


    next time, show him some slugs in low brass !
     
  9. Traders

    Traders Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,613
    Bruce Em,

    I'm sure low brass with slugs would pass the test. After all, it's low brass and how far could it go.
     
  10. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,003
    Build him some 1 1/2 oz baby magnums using low brass hulls and see if he has a sense of humor! :) It used to be with FACTORY loads, that a high brass shell was a more powerful shell, because of the opinion that high brass was needed to contain the extra pressure. Low brass were then relegated to the lighter loads. Today, there is really no rhyme nor reason for high brass, other than marketing. With old paper hulls, there may have been some advantage to the high brass, but most modern hulls will contain pressures within established limits. Some might even be reloaded and do it more than once! There were shells made that didn't even have a brass or metal head. They were all plastic and worked just fine.
     
  11. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,328
    Location:
    Shawnee, Kansas, USA
    Well, the guy may not have gone about it in the best manner, but his heart was in the right place. Our club, like many, limit shooters to nothing heavier than ATA handicap trap loads. Some of the members help police that. If I hear what I think are field loads, or see someone with shells with high brass (which is actually only a marketing ploy) yeah, I'll check to make sure they're not shooting heavy field loads.

    And a few times, I have found folks who didn't pay attention to the rules and were shooting crazy stuff like number 4 steel 3" hunting loads.

    But I would have accepted your explanation that they were trap reloads.

    Interestingly, at least one of the European brands have trap loads with high brass, specifically RC4.
     
  12. Boxbirder

    Boxbirder Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2011
    Messages:
    254
    Some times people just can not mind there own business. That's also the same guy giving you free pointers after you just out shot him. Just another reason that confirms why I hate to shoot with guys I don't know. Every club has a few know it alls, it's are job to sniff em out and walk the other way.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page

trap loads in high brass hulls

,

trap rule using high brass