1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

HELP UNDERSTANDING PITCH

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by KEYBEAR, Apr 13, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. KEYBEAR

    KEYBEAR Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,222
    Guys talk about Negative and Positive Pitch . But really how many really understand it . How much is to much or to little . Is Negative good or bad and if Negative is good why . I,v had alot of trap guns and have only had two or three that fit well . I just got a stock back after having a stock man work it over . It fits well and shoot were I look with very little recoil . I did the stand the gun to the wall thing but just what did that tell me about pitch ?? I really feel it is one of the thinks we overlook when fitting a new gun to the shooter .
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,437
    It would tell you whether you have negative or positive pitch. The right amount of the right pitch can help make your shooting comfortable. HMB
     
  3. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Brillion, WI
    Pitch is the angle of the butt to the bore, close to 90-degrees.

    When you stand the gun on the butt next to a vertical surface, positive pitch will angle the barrel away from the surface.

    If the pitch is negative, the barrel will angle toward the vertical surface.

    Pitch is often measured in inches from the barrel's 28-inch point (for comparative purposes) to the surface. It would be better to measure it in degrees but most of us do not have the equipment to measure it that way.

    Pitch is wrong when it does not fit the shooter when in his or her normal shooting posture. The pitch is correct when the entire recoil pad or butt makes simultaneous contact with the shoulder as the gun is being mounted.

    If there is too much pitch (bottom toe of the recoil not sticking out far enough) the butt can slide up on the shoulder during recoil. Too little pitch (toe sticking out too far) and there is likely to be excessive barrel rise during recoil, which can cause cheek-slap, the painful contact to the cheek by the comb of the stock.

    Rollin
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.