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Help on Remington 1100

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by jm1079, Jul 11, 2010.

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  1. jm1079

    jm1079 Well-Known Member

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    I have an 1100 LT that has a stock nut that is so stucked that even my 250 lb buddy and I could not loosen with a big screw driver. Bought the gun used years ago and never had the need to remove the stock until recently when I wanted to put a shorter stock.
    Any info, advice or input will be much appreciated. JM
     
  2. jmac_cope

    jmac_cope Active Member

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    JM,
    I had the same problem. Brownell's has a tool made just for your problem. It is a 3/8 " socket with a screw driver type bit on the end. Simply place it over the stock screw, snap on a ratchet and "Presto" the nut is loose. You can try a lot of different tools but one of two things is likely to happen. You'll break your stock or foul up the nut so the Brownell's tool will not grab it. Good luck.

    John
     
  3. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I have that tool John mentioned, and it works well. My advice is to order and wait for the tool.

    But as an expedient, I've also used a tree patten lug wrench. This is the kind that's a big "+", with three sockets and a screwdriver. I had to remove the cocking handle, pad the receiver with cardboard, then use wood blocks about 3/4" to 1" thick that covered the entire receiver, and placed it in a vise. This gave me the torque I needed. One issue is slippage. The tire iron blade is tapered, and it can slip. Make sure it is inserted well. I've not had it happen, but it is possible to actually crack the stock if the blade slips and turns.

    You'll probably have to put the receiver in a vise no matter which tool you use. Just make sure the wood blocks entirely cover it, or you could cave it in.
     
  4. Ljutic111

    Ljutic111 TS Member

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    You can also use a square shaft long handle large screw driver and a 12" adjustable wrench to turn it but also being carefull locking the receiver in a wooden vise .
     
  5. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    I use a jack handle. In your case I would get the tool.

    HM
     
  6. Ed Y

    Ed Y TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    The "TOOL" really makes an easy job of it, even for a little guy like me

    Ed Yanchok
     
  7. jm1079

    jm1079 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys. Does Brownell have a name for this tool, so I will know how to order it on their website, unless somebody has one to sell? JM
     
  8. GBatch_25

    GBatch_25 Active Member

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    As an alternative, find an 18 mm deep 3/8" drive socket. Cut a piece of metal so it fits into 2 of the notches inside the socket. I used a piece I cut from an old garage door opener brace. Try to make it fit tight so it wedges itself into the socket. Get a 3/8" drive socket wrench and an extension long enough to go into your stock with the socket on the end. Put the stock in a vise and give it a try. A friend here near me had the same problem and tried this and said it worked like a charm.

    Gene Batchelar
    Wheaton, IL
     
  9. jm1079

    jm1079 Well-Known Member

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    Just found out the name of the tool, It is called "1100 Buttstock Bolt Bit". Will be ordering it in the morning. Once again, thanks to all of you for your help, advice and info. JM
     
  10. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Use some penetrating oil, such as Kroil. Let it do its work for a while before trying.

    Heating and cooling also works, but be careful how you heat it.
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    timb- How can you get the penetration oil to flow past all of the unfinished wood and get to the threads?

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Pat,

    The "stock nut" that looks like a top hat has a hole in the top/middle.

    Spray or drip the penetrating oil in the hole.
     
  13. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    A tip I found here some time ago is to use a wood bore speed bit. I don't remember if it was 13/16 or 7/8, but you can put a wrench or piers on the flat part for leverage. It worked for me. Good luck, Bob
     
  14. SonoraMike

    SonoraMike TS Member

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    asked the same question awhile back, lots of info within

    http://www.trapshooters.com/cfpages/sthread.cfm?threadid=221171
     
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