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HELP-Jumping the bird

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by OSH, Jun 3, 2010.

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  1. OSH

    OSH TS Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Messages:
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    This spring I came out and find Im jerking the barrel up and shooting over esp straightaways. Do I need to wait and maintain low gun position longer, press as in Harlans system, or go to barrel weight. Seem to be hitching on angle birds too. I dust 17, miss one, dust 15 miss one. FRUSTRATING. GURUS HELP!!! Shooting six years.

    OSH
     
  2. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    3,396
    You aren't seeing the target clearly before you move the gun. You're jumping at streaks. Targets cannot outrun shot. Assuming you know where to hold on each post, hold a low gun (just below the front edge of the trap house roof) and do not move the gun toward the target until you see it's image clearly... no streaks, no tails. Your move will be more controlled because you will know where you are moving TO.

    MK
     
  3. JES

    JES Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    I also follow Harlen's disc's and have watched them alot. Try this forget the lunge to the bird bring the gun in and set up use the shoulder - push the shoulder to the bird and you will be amazed, using the shoulder puts the pressure on the foot (left)like he explains if a right handed shooter. Hope this helps.
     
  4. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    If you're poking at targets and shooting over straightaways, you have the symptoms of someone who is arm shooting... controlling the gun movement with the arms instead of the entire upper body... which can come from not seeing the target clearly before trying to move to it (read that "surprise" and "panic").

    Everything from your waist up should be like the turret of a tank...everything moves as one unit. Arms don't move separately, shoulders don't move separately, head doesn't move separately; every move to the target is done with the waist. You turn from the waist and elevate from the waist with the gun locked solidly into the shoulder pocket.

    There's a lot more going on with Harlan than just a simple press to the target. Press forward onto your left foot and you have to tilt back a little bit at the waist to compensate (or raise the gun a bit with the left hand); I know, I've done 2 of his clinics and tried to do as he said each time only to discover that it works better for me if I put about 55% of my weight on my left foot and do not change that throughout the shot. Harlan makes that small compensation as he shifts his weight forward and doesn't even think about it as a part of the movement.

    Spend time building muscle memory moving your entire upper body as one locked unit.

    MK
     
  5. RAScott

    RAScott Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2008
    Messages:
    813
    I sometimes jump the bird or I swing thru it and jerk the gun down. I have tried to slow down and focus on the bird,and very important dont move the gun untill you see the target. That has helped. I attibute this to a sort of flinch, but man is it frustrating.

    Good topic .

    Bob S
     
  6. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    15,639
    Location:
    Green Bay Wisconsin
    This has caused me a lot of problems over the years. The maddening thing is you don't realize it till you miss a few.

    The pistol guys have a term, "target acquisition". For me it means holding still till I have my vision locked on the bird. I have to tell myself I have time to shoot further out, there is no hurry.

    Put the gun up to your hold point and pause so your eyes focus on the area in front of the house, then call for the bird.

    When not shooting, look far away and bring your vision back in to set up. Your eyes can come in from a ways out much easier than if you are looking at the ground or something else and try to move your focus out to the trap.

    We have a pond in front so I look at the opposite shore.

    HM
     
  7. Charlie Becknell

    Charlie Becknell Well-Known Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    1,610
    I agree with the
    Advice that has been given. I
    have struggled with this for years
    I found holding the gun perfectly still when calling for the target and staying still until I have visual lock works for me.

    Charlie
     
  8. maka

    maka Member

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    Nov 23, 2009
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    Mr. Tom Hoppe gave several clinics at our club. His advise was to set your feet so your right heel, (r-handers) just barley raised off the surface.
    Swing with your upper body from waist up. Hold low enough to cleary see targets. Follow thru and stay in gun until all pieces hit the ground.
     
  9. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Practice holding your gun still while someone pulls for you and varies the length of time between your call and the release. Shoot 50-100 targets that way and practice keeping your barrel still until you see a target. It'll smooth you out too.

    Advice came to me from Leo III.
     
  10. JTEA

    JTEA Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Messages:
    367
    Location:
    So. East corner PA
    I find that I've usually lowered my hold too much and then I'm focused too close to the house.

    For a practice exercise, follow the previous advice, but try holding higher than usual and shooting on post three. You should see the target forever before shooting it. Concentrate on holding steady until it reaches the height of your barrel. (Trapping the target) You may not want to adopt this style permanently (it can work on my back when I do it) but I have seen old timers who shot flat guns hold way high and come down on everything. It's good if you have limited reaction ability and vision. If you haven't done this before you may be surprised. There are shooters in our area who hold higher than level for all targets and many of the traps are set quite flat around here. (Peak height @ 8 ft.)

    Good luck, JT
     
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