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Help identify an old shot shell reloader

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by dstout5, Apr 4, 2012.

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  1. dstout5

    dstout5 TS Member

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    [​IMG]

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    I've come across this old reloader..no name on it. Very small powder and shot tubes compared to most as well as an unusual slide. Is anyone familiar with this..maker and value?
     
  2. chuckie68

    chuckie68 Active Member

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    Same color as a Mec. Could have been an early Pacific-Hornady. Maybe you should send a pic to those companies customer service depts. and ask.

    Chuck
     
  3. dstout5

    dstout5 TS Member

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    If no one here knows, I'll have to do that..just thought some old-timer may know
     
  4. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    may be an acme. I had one similar to it but not exactly the same. The acme did have a round charge bar motordoc
     
  5. ke4yyd

    ke4yyd Member

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    Looks like an Acme to me. I got one in the late 50's.
     
  6. RickN

    RickN Well-Known Member

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    Didn't Redding have one with a round bar also?

    I saw one at a farm auction years ago and I remember it looking something like this one.
     
  7. fishguts

    fishguts Member

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  8. Big Jack

    Big Jack Well-Known Member

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    Take a good look at the metal cover of the powder/shot containers. We have one very similar that has "Mayville Eng" stamped in the metal cover. One of the very early "Mec's" Same color, pretty close in design. Great conversation piece at the trap club.

    Big Jack
     
  9. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    I thought MEC just because of the bottom plate is similar, along with the spring design of todays models.
     
  10. RickN

    RickN Well-Known Member

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    Here are pictures of a couple of old ACME loaders.


    http://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/cpg1410/albums/userpics/33132/acme.jpg”>


    <img src=
     
  11. RickN

    RickN Well-Known Member

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    Here are pictures of a couple of old ACME loaders





    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    It is a very early Mec, have one stored in attic that my grandfather left when he passed. he told me it was a Mayville
     
  13. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Did MEC by chance buy the patent from ACME, or did ACME just change names over to MEC? Maybe there was not a patent on these reloaders at the time. They sure look like MEC's of todays features.
     
  14. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Rick. You must be old. You know about all this old stuff
     
  15. dstout5

    dstout5 TS Member

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    Any idea of its value.. Any user interest or just as a collectable?
     
  16. jhmorrisn

    jhmorrisn TS Member

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    It looks like the "Acme Reloader, Appleton Wis, Modern 200 I bought it from Mr. Moneymaker in Omaha NE. in about 1959 or so. He had a shop on Military Ave. Paid $25.00 for it which included 5 lbs of shot, can of red dot primer and some wads.

    He also sold me an 870 which was marked "TB". But he told me it wasn't ready a TB. Didn't know the difference of what that mean. A year or so ago I checked the numbers on the barrel and it came back that it was make in 1958. Paid him $125 for it.

    My son used it when he shot high school trap. The LOP is bit long for his daughter so he got her a 1100.

    Recently my daughter's boy wanted to take up trap. True to form, I put together an 870 magnum action with a trap barrel and stock. He is having a ball.

    This Saturday, I'm headed for the Fremont/ Valley trap range, Grandduaghter will be shooting on the Papillion HS Teams
     
  17. tusntuk2

    tusntuk2 TS Member

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    Wow, talk about your blast-from-the-past! I have been reading with interest the talk about these old shotshell reloaders, and I have greatly enjoyed the pictures, too. It's amazing to find this discussion only a week old! I have information about ACME reloaders. I will try to relate what my memory tells me, although please forgive me for the obvious time travel since then if the memories aren't complete or perfectly accurate. I remember meeting the inventor of this machine, and it was not MEC, apparently their designs were different. I lived in Appleton,WI, in the '60's, my dad owned a small print shop there, and George, the ACME inventor, (can't remember his last name, darn! maybe, Ward?) came to the print shop to buy printed advertising for his various products. He called it ACME because some of the first shotshell reloaders, marketed after the Civil war, were ACME, so he was paying them tribute. As I remember, George had some small shop (his garage?) where he invented his projects, but he did not mass produce them there. For that he needed a larger machine shop, hence the enlistment of Mayville Engineering to produce parts for him. I think MEC was run by a couple of brothers, or maybe cousins, named Brockheimer or Brockhuber, something like that. One of them, or maybe another cousin (Bob?), started working with George to produce/assemble/market these machines. I was about 10-12 years old, helping my dad at the print shop, and George was always busy inventing and refining ideas for this machine and others. There were lots of changes as paper shells became plastic, paper wads became plastic shot columns, and new powders demanded changes to the dies and constant refiguring. For a period of a couple years it seemed like George was in the print shop often, changing the ads and printing new flyers, instruction sheets, etc. I remember George complaining a lot and arguing with my dad about all of this. I am guessing at one point he must have made the folks at MEC mad, too, because there was lots of talk about how "they stole his designs". Maybe he angered the brother working with him and the guy took George's ideas and started making his own at the MEC shop, I don't know. George probably did not patent them as quickly as he invented new stuff. Maybe it was money, or a lack of it, but it seems like MEC did claim the ACME machine as their own, and that claim might be questioned. It would be interesting to compare early MEC machines with the ACMEs, noting design elements and refinements, etc. Is the MEC really George's machine? Eventually my dad acquired one of the reloaders, a later model with the square slide bar, drop in dies, and a rotating collar,and a prototype water cooled heated shot shell former. As my brothers and I were then old enough to shoot, we started shooting trap and reloading shells at home on this machine, which I still own. Meanwhile, my uncle, an avid trapshooter at the national level, outfitted his pickup with display machines and traveled to various events trying to market them. That stopped when he got out west and settled down, but also by then (mid 1960's) he learned that MEC was marketing the very same machines too, and he couldn't compete. The MEC machines had stainless steel parts and dies, painted or anodized red tanks, fancy litho printed information, mounting boards and lots of MEC identification stamped into everything. George had none of that, so his machine was black steel with no marking at all, and compared to MEC it made his original machine look like the knock-off. As far as I know, George was never able to work it out with MEC, and he probably never received any credit or any money from them. I'm sure George grumpled all the way to his grave about it. So - that's my story, and I hope it's not too far fetched as it was a long time ago and mostly second hand from a kid in his dad's print shop. But it was fun for a while! Just thought I'd share. Now - anybody need a few different sizes of 12 ga. paper wads? I have some leftover supplies! (Jim)
     
  18. RickN

    RickN Well-Known Member

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    This posting is from an outdoor column following another question about an old ACME reloader.




    ""This Acme reloader was manufactured in Appleton, Wisconsin and one of the guys who worked for Acme was Bob Brockhuber. Brockhuber told me that the owner was very difficult to work for and Brockhuber could not please him. After an upsetting day Brockhuber took Acme's basic idea and began manufacturing shotshell reloaders on his own. Today the company is known as MEC, the biggest shotshell reloader manufacturer in the world. The reloading tool is a real historical marker for the shotgunners. In old American Rifleman magazines the owner of Acme proved he was very upset. He put ads in the American Rifleman stating, "You wouldn't buy a horse from a horsethief, so buy only an Acme reloader.""
     
  19. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    Oh how I miss paragraph formatting ....
     
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