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Heat damaging to hulls?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by sernv99, Jul 7, 2010.

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  1. sernv99

    sernv99 Active Member

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    here in the great state of VA, we are having some extreme heat and humidity, probably around 100 to 105 degrees.

    I have my spent hulls stashed in plastic bags in one of those outdoor public storage units. How much heat can shotgun hulls take before they start to "go bad" due to the heat? I would imagine the temp inside one of those storage units is as hot as being in a vehicle with the windows rolled up...
     
  2. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    Unless they are "Paper" hulls, I wouldn't worry about it. The plastic hulls won't be bothered one bit by the heat.

    ss
     
  3. goatskin

    goatskin TS Member

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    And if they ARE paper hulls, they will be NICELY re-waxed ... win-win.

    Bob
     
  4. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Heat might slowly destroy those hulls. It sure plays havoc with plastic wads over time. I moved mine out of the shed and into the basement over the summer. Old style AA hulls cannot be replaced easily!!
     
  5. KEYBEAR

    KEYBEAR Active Member

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    And they don,t get hot when you shoot them ??
     
  6. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    Just a thought when you pull the trigger on a loaded shell in the chamber how much heat do you suppose is on those shells. I figure that the heat in a storage shed would have to be pretty intense to equal the heat that is produced when you shoot them.

    Bob Lawless
     
  7. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Try leaving a bag of plastic wads in that hot shed over a summer or two-then report back your findings. Heat in a exposed shed lasts many hours. Intense heat from firing lasts only a short while!!
     
  8. KEYBEAR

    KEYBEAR Active Member

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    Taking about Hulls not Wads
     
  9. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    Depending on the melt factor and the type of plastic that the hulls are made from (most are made from polyethylene), heat is not near as much a factor in plastic degradation as is UV. It's best not to use either hulls or wads if they have been in the direct sunlight for more than a couple or three days.

    UV changes the molecular integrity of plastic far faster than heat unless the heat reaches the parts melt point and I doubt you reach those kinds of temps in a shed. Most polyethylene begins to flow at about 400 degrees F.
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Barry - What in the world is "molecular integrity"?

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. brownk80

    brownk80 Member

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    I would be more worried about the moisture generated from storing them in a plastic bag than what will happen to the hull. The newer shells don't have brass bases and I have seen rust around primer pockets as well. Put them in one of those large plastic containers you get at Ace or Home Depot. You can see thru them and they don't seem to retain moisture the way a bag does and they stack and store easily.

    Brownk80
     
  12. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    I used to sell for a plastics molding firm so I'm not an expert on the chemistry of plastics. I know just enough to sell the plastic parts we made.

    UV literally alters the molecules in most plastic rendering it a different product than it was when produced originally as a virgin resin. Plastic resin is engineered at the molecular level. Once exposed to UV, virgin plastic resin can be made more UV protected by blending additives just designed for the purpose. These additives are very expensive but greatly extend the life of the part. Kids plastic playground toys are UV protected for example or they would turn to dust very quickly.

    Some plastics can be protected by blending with carbon black but then, of course, the finished part can only be black in color. Carbon black is not the best way to UV protect the plastic as it makes the finished part quite brittle. You might remember the old Win. AA "Handicap" shell that used black hulls. They used carbon black in their production. They were also much more brittle than the red AA hulls.
     
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