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Have you used a DAYLIGHT simulator lamp?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by yvonne, Oct 27, 2007.

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  1. yvonne

    yvonne Banned User Banned

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    I have a friend, I believe suffers from Seasonal light disorder. As soon as the fall/winter season comes, he goes into a type of lack of daylight depression. Have any of you used the lamp that is supposed to simulate daylight and have had any success>.....or lack or success?
     
  2. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    yvonne, I work on a pysch ward and we make use of the lights for people with SAD. I suffer from it myself and although I bought a light I can't say that it helped me any. What does help me is two weeks in the Islands in January. The power range that works is very specific and many of the lights sold to help with this condition do NOTHING. I don't remember the stats but I will find out tomorrow and post them for you. They work great for many people and I know several of our Doc's use them. It can't hurt is the bottom line. If your friend can get some exercise that would also be a big help. I don't think many people realize how important exercise is for our mental well being. Jeff
     
  3. C Prince

    C Prince TS Member

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    Yvonne,

    I just returned from a year in Greenland, and it is dark there 3-4 months out of the year. The Dr.'s there suggested using a tanning bed 3-4 times a week. It really works. Plus they would get a good tan for the winter.

    Chad
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Jimmy Borum - Please teach me something. I always thought light output was measured by wave length and intensity. I am not familiar with the output measured in degrees Kelvin (heat). I know what would happen if a light bulb actually got to 6300 degrees K.

    Is this unit of light measurement based on what would be omitted by some standard material at a given temperature? I could look up the answer to my question but it is simpler for me to just ask you.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    <I>Please teach me something. I always thought light output was measured by wave length and intensity. I am not familiar with the output measured in degrees Kelvin (heat). I know what would happen if a light bulb actually got to 6300 degrees K.

    Is this unit of light measurement based on what would be omitted by some standard material at a given temperature? I could look up the answer to my question but it is simpler for me to just ask you.</I>

    You're right, Pat. You know about things that are "red hot" and "white hot". Well, the color of the light is described as being the same as light emitted from heated block of carbon compared to a standard black background:

    "So, why do we measure the hue of the light as a "temperature"? This was started in the late 1800s, when the British physicist William Kelvin heated a block of carbon. It glowed in the heat, producing a range of different colors at different temperatures. The black cube first produced a dim red light, increasing to a brighter yellow as the temperature went up, and eventually produced a bright blue-white glow at the highest temperatures. In his honor, Color Temperatures are measured in degrees Kelvin, which are a variation on Centigrade degrees. Instead of starting at the temperature water freezes, the Kelvin scale starts at "absolute zero," which is -273 Centigrade. (Subtract 273 from a Kelvin temperature, and you get the equivalent in Centigrade.) However, the color temperatures attributed to different types of lights are correlated based on visible colors matching a standard black body, and are not the actual temperature at which a filament burns." (Source: "Kelvin Color Temperatures")

    Morgan
     
  6. sptnclays

    sptnclays Member

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    I do believe it's a specific wave length of sunlight that stimulates seratonin release in the brain. A happy hormone. Several of the "anti-depressant" drugs like prozac act in the same fashion. If you have to live north better living thru drugs!
     
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