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HAPPY BIRTHDAY ROBERT E LEE.

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Auctioneer, Jan 19, 2010.

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  1. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    Today is Robert E Lee's Birthday. Happy Birthday to a great man.
     
  2. oskerspap12

    oskerspap12 Active Member

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    Truly a great man and patriot......
    I wish we had more gentlemen like him, this country could sure use one right about now.
     
  3. notarget

    notarget TS Member

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    Some of us can still remember when Lee's birthday and Washington's birthday were observed as separate holidays.
     
  4. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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  5. PAR8HED

    PAR8HED Member

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    My Grandmother, rest her soul, used to get a card from a friend each year. It simply said, "You are invited to a celebration of the General's Birthday and luncheon."

    If you have to ask....

    HJH
     
  6. sharkie

    sharkie TS Member

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    Happy Birthday R.E. Lee .The Mrs and her twin were also born on this date. Both named after the great general .
     
  7. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    For those of you that don't know, the actor Robert Duvall, is the Generals great, great grandson. Bulge.
     
  8. partygirl

    partygirl TS Member

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    203rd Birthday of Robert E. Lee

    On 19 January 1807, Robert Edward Lee was born to the Revolutionary War hero Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee III and Anne Carter Lee at Stratford Hall in Westmoreland County, Virginia. Many cities, counties, and states proclaimed 2007 as the year of Lee in recognition of his accomplishments. Lee is most recognized in his role as Confederate General, but for 32 years he honorably served in the United States Army and in 1861 was offered command of that Army.

    Lee's early education was in Alexandria, Virginia. After the his father's retirement from the Army he went to recover from illness in the West Indies leaving Virginia when Lee was six years old in 1813. One his return home he died on 25 March 1818 at the home of the daughter of Nathaniel Green on Cumberland Island, Georgia. In January 1863, while inspecting the coastal defenses he visited his father's grave. In 1824, he was appointed to the United States Military Academy at West Point where he graduated second in the class of 1829 without receiving a single demerit. This record stands today. After graduation he was as commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant of the United States Engineer Corps and on 29 August 1829, assigned to Cockspur Island, South Carolina (now in Georgia) to supervise in the 17 month construction of Fort Pulaski. He later worked on projects in New York and Virginia.

    Robert E. Lee married Mary Anna Randolph Custis in June 1831. She was the daughter of George Washington Parke Custis, the grandson of Martha Custis Washington and adopted son of George Washington. They resided in Arlington House located across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. where they raised seven children. Mary, an only child, inherited the house from her parents.

    In 1836, Lee is appointed First Lieutenant and in 1838 rises to Captain. In 1845, Mexican War starts over the annexation of Texas. In August 1846, Lee is sent to Texas after months of watching from afar in Washington. He arrives in San Antonio, Texas and first serves under General Wool but he later reassigned to the staff of General Winfield Scott. Lee was entrusted with the vital duties of mapping out the terrain in advance of the Army. He was responsible for dividing the line of advance for the U.S. troops. During the campaign Lee was wounded at the Battle of Chapultepec which was his first and only wound in battle. During his notable service in Mexico, including leading troops into battle, in Mexico rose several ranks to Colonel. While unknown to the public, his reputation in the Army was solid. Later General Scott would call Lee "the best soldier I ever saw in the field." Also serving with Lee in the Mexican War was James Longstreet, Thomas J. Jackson, George Pickett, and U.S. Grant.

    In May 1852, Lee was surprised to find his next appointment as the Superintendent of the United States Military Academy. He felt unqualified for the position, but took on the challenge only to be recognized as one of the best Superintendents of the institution. After serving for three years, Lee was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel the new Second Calvary and assigned to Texas. During this time he spent little time fighting and much of the time trying court martial as various posts. In October 1857 he took a two month leave of absence to return to Virginia to settle his father-in-law's estate. This leave was extended several times because of the poor shape of Arlington and George Washington Curtis' complicated will. Upon Lee's return home he also discovered Mary was quite sick herself with advanced arthritis. This extended stay proved fateful in 1859 when he was called to Washington to be dispatched with troops to Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia). At Harpers Ferry Lee put down John Brown's raid of the United States Arsenal. Lee thought the affair at Harpers Ferry minor.

    In February 1860, Lee was assigned to command the Department of Texas. Again leaving his family – Mary invalid with arthritis and four unmarried daughters – he grew depressed at seeing less qualified soldiers promoted in part because Lee was not a self-promoter. After 31 years in the Army he felt he had very little to show. From Fort Macon, Texas, Lee watched as Lincoln was elected, South Carolina seceding followed by a rapid secession of states including Georgia (which seceded on Lee's birthday) and the formation of the Confederate States of America. Suddenly in March, Lee was relieved of his duties and recalled to Washington, D.C.

    Lee returned to Arlington. At this time Virginia has not left the Union. He met with his old commander Winfield Scott who urged Lee to remain loyal. Several weeks later, Lee is granted the rank of full Colonel. About this time he also received the offer of Brigadier General from the Confederates which he ignored. Then 12 April, Fort Sumter received the opening volley from the Confederates. Lincoln called up 75,000 men and summoned Lee to Washington.

    Abraham Lincoln instructed Secretary of War Simon Cameron to offer command of the Union Army to Lee in April 1861. The type of promotion came ill timed for events escalating throughout the spring of 1861. On 20 April he wrote to Secretary Cameron "I have the honor to tender the resignation of my commission as colonel of the First Regiment of Cavalry."

    The same day he also wrote his sister "With all my devotion to the Union and the feeling of loyalty and duty as an American citizen, I have not been able to make up my mind to raise my hand against my relatives, my children, my home. I therefore have resigned my commission in the army and save in defense of my native state, with the sincere hope that my poor services may never be needed." Two days later, Lee was summoned to Richmond where Virginia was voting on secession where he was offered command of the forces of Virginia.

    Lee grappled with his loyalties, but settled on his home state in the end. Recall that in the period of United States history, most people saw their allegiance locally to their state first and the United States second.

    On 23 May 1861, Virginia left the Union and the next day Federal forces took over Arlington House. Mary Lee had left only 9 days before. During the War Between the States, the Federal Army buried its dead on the plantation lawn in retaliation for Lee's allegiance to Virginia. This will become Arlington National Cemetery and the Lee family will eventually be compensated by the Federal government for the taking of the property.

    Lee's first year of Confederate service was a frustrating one dealing with paper, politics, and advising President Jefferson Davis on military matters. Lee requested, but was denied by Davis to go to Manassas. Lee's organization and strategy to concentrate forces at Manassas was critical to the Confederate victory. He later wrote his wife that he was "mortified" that he did not witness the "struggle for my home and neighbors." Lee would have his first field command as an advisor in West Virginia which became a disaster that would haunt him but not taking a more aggressive command of the situation of bickering officers and measles among the ranks. Returning from West Virginia Lee sported his grey beard and a horse named Jeff Davis he bought for $2,000 which he renamed Traveller.

    Davis gave Lee command of all Confederate forces on the southeastern coast. Lee traveled the coastline fortifying defenses at Charleston, South Carolina and Savannah, Georgia. This duty was important but did not have the public appeal of field command that he would finally achieve in June 1862.

    Union General George B. McClellan marched up the peninsula between the James and York Rivers toward the Confederate capital of Richmond. Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston, in a move repeated in the Atlanta campaign, retreated further and further back. During the Battle of Seven Pines (31 May to 1 June 1862), Johnston was wounded. Davis gave Lee the command of Johnston's army. Lee ordered earthworks around Richmond which gave him the nickname "King of Spades." Finally Lee attacked McClellan and in a series of battles called Seven Days, Lee pushed McClellan back down the peninsula.

    For the next three years Lee lead the Army of Northern Virginia though Sharpsburg, Gettysburg, Petersburg. He split successfully split his army twice in face of superior numbers. Finally, out manned and out supplied, Lee surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia at a small farm of Wilmer Mclean at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia. Ironically McLean moved his family from the site of Manassas in 1861 to Appomattox to get away from the war. McLean later said the war started in his backyard and ended in his parlor.

    In the fall of 1865, Lee was offered and accepted the president of troubled Washington College in Lexington, Virginia . The school later was renamed Washington and Lee College in his honor.

    Lee was a man of honor, proud of his name and heritage. After the War Between the States, he was offered $50,000 for the use of his name. His reply was: "Sirs, my name is the heritage of my parents. It is all I have and it is not for sale." His refusal to this offer came at a time when he had nothing.

    General Robert E. Lee died of a heart attack at his home at Washington College at 9:30 A.M. on 12 October 1870. His last words were "Strike the Tent." Robert E. Lee is buried at his college's Lee Chapel near his family and favorite horse Traveller.

    General Robert E. Lee, sought to be an example to the citizens of the South to rebuild the American Union. He signed an oath of loyalty to the United States on 2 October 1865 after his inauguration as president of Washington College. This was the one matter absence when the Congress responded to Lee's formal application in 13 June 1865 – an action endorsed by General Grant. However, this oath was never processed and somehow misplaced so when Lee died he was a man with no country. This oath reemerged in 1970 in the National Archives. Senate Joint Resolution 23 posthumously restored the oversight with full rights of citizenship to General Robert E. Lee on 22 July 1975 with the signature of the late President Gerald R. Ford.

    One hundred years after Lee's oath was sent to Washington, a clerk came across it while sorting through papers at the National Archives. By an act of Congress and with the endorsement of President Ford, Lee's citizenship was restored on 22 July 1975.
     
  9. paul e. stark

    paul e. stark TS Member

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    Lee and Nixon got to love Ford.
     
  10. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    I couldn't believe they cast Martin Sheen to play him in Gettysburg. Lee didn't deserve that.
     
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