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Hanging deer??

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by blkcloud, Oct 6, 2011.

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  1. blkcloud

    blkcloud Active Member

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    Over the years I have killed and butchered deer and donated them to local "in need" faimlys. this year I plan on stepping up a bit, buying a walk in cooler, bigger grinder and donating the meat to a local help center, my question on hanging the deer.. is it better if they are hung and aged with the hide on or off? I have seen both at local butchers.. also what is the average time you would need to age a deer before butchering? I have always let them hang about a week if the weather cooperated. thanks!
     
  2. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Hide off for sure. 7 to ten days.
     
  3. skeezix

    skeezix Member

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    I found this link;

    http://www.askthemeatman.com/Deer%20Handling%20Tips.htm

    it says hide on is best - if you can control the temps. There seem to be 2 schools of thought on this.

    Personally - I think it's a compromise - if you skin the deer - then you can thoroughly clean the carcass and make sure you get any traces of hair, dirt, etc off the meat - these things influence the final flavors of the venison. OTOH, if you skin the deer you will end up with a tough dry rind that will have to be peeled off of the meat. I think it's also a function of how fast you are able to cool the carcass - if you have a hanging refrigerated space you can control the cooling so you could hang 'hide on' if you want to. If you are depending on cool nights in the garage, you may have to skin the deer so it can cool down.

    john
     
  4. SeldomShoots

    SeldomShoots Active Member

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    I thought a side of beef hangs for about 2 weeks. I wouldn't think deer would be any different.
     
  5. slayer

    slayer Well-Known Member

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    week to 10 days in cool temps. 30 to 50 degree range. I hang them now with skin on for forementioned reasons. Have to spread them real well to enhance the cooling. use a stick or chunk of lumber to spread the hind quarters and ribs. Bill Wheeler
     
  6. BigBadBob

    BigBadBob TS Member

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    I have hung deer with and without hide for up to a week. Occasionaly, due to weather or work have shot them in the morning and they are in the freezer before dark on the same day. I honestly can not tell a difference in tenderness or flavor. I've also noticed no differences in age or sex of the deer.
    If you are grinding the whole deer, aging will make no difference.

    I think tenderness and flavor are determined by the condition the animal is in when it is harvested. Obviously, any deer that has been spooked and has run a while will have more blood in the meat and be a little tougher. I took an old sway-back buck a few years ago that I had watched bed down. 3 hours later when he got up and gave me the shot he was under absolutely no stress when the bullet hit him. He was one of the most flavorful and tender deer I have taken. I have also taken yearlings that came by on a drive and were tougher than my boot toungue.
     
  7. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    Unlike beef fat, deer fat turns rancid fast, quick is good.
     
  8. mette56

    mette56 Well-Known Member

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    If you have a problem with weather too warm, keep bags of ice in the carcuss then shroud it all in poly...loosly so air can circulate. Keeps them cool but if you're getting a walk-in cooler, your miles ahead with controlled temps. We have actually stopped hanging deer to age. Skin it, quarter it, put it in a 160 quart cooler. Keep ice over entire deer. Tip cooler up on one end, remove drain plug and leave for one week, keeping lots of ice on top. This method washes all blood from meat and does not harden the outer layer. Far superior to other methods of aging, IMO.

    milt
     
  9. JON R THOMPSON

    JON R THOMPSON TS Member

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    Please don't compare hanging time for all game animals the same, they do vary. Deer, hide off under prime cooling conditions 4-7 days. Elk no more then three day, even in the best cooler. Moose is similar to Elk, any more hang time and you will have to remove good meat from the outside edges.

    JT
     
  10. noknock1

    noknock1 Active Member

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    I can not tell the difference in taste when it comes to aging deer or elk. The deer I shoot routinely are processed within 24 hours of field dressing. I always thought whether a deer or elk was stressed when shot vs. calmly grazing may have had an effect on the taste until a butcher who does my beef explained that cattle in the shoot 15 deep getting pushed to the front completely enclosed head to tail are extremely stressed once they get work their way to the front of the line to get the bolt or .22, etc. to the brain. He explained to me that deer fat unlike beef fat is nasty tasting and that is the number one reason a deer will taste gamey. Urine and feces quickly rinsed off does not effect the taste as much as deer fat. I agree with him.

    Myself and a friend just got our annual beef and that beast hung for about 14 days, of course it was 1200 pounds hundred on the hoof. So I guess my point is, if a beef with a hanging weight of several hundred pounds tastes great after aging for two weeks, then is it really necessary to hang a deer with a hanging weight of 60 pounds give or take 20# for a week?

    I won't dispute the claim that aging helps tenderize the meat. My deer gets turned into ground burger with the exception of the straps and tenders which are cooked rare to medium rare at most. So when dealing with other cuts, then aging probably does help.
     
  11. BigBadBob

    BigBadBob TS Member

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    In my experience, and I have harvested well over 100 deer in the last 30+ years and have processed almost every one of them myself, the wild gamey taste comes from the blood, fat and " silver" skin. Deer meat will never taste like beef because it is not beef. There is no marbleing in deer meat. The fat is outside the tissue. The whole trick to tasty venison is to remove The "silver" skin and fat, all of it, soak the meat at least an hour or so, preferably overnight in salt water prior to cooking. The salt will draw out a lot of the blood.
    No matter the cut or method of cooking, do not overcook. With no fat, overcooking will only dry out the meat and make even the tenderloin tough. Even when grinding my burger meat, I remove all fat and "silver" skin and grind nothing but pure, red, meat.
    As I said before, if you are grinding the meat to burger there is absolutely no reason to age the carcass.
     
  12. SeldomShoots

    SeldomShoots Active Member

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    shannon, will deer fat go rancid hanging in a freezer below 30 degrees? I can honestly say I was not aware of that. But thats the kind of hanging I was referring to on beef.

    John
     
  13. RWT

    RWT Well-Known Member

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    Personally I used to hang for a week to 10 days at the locker with hide on before butchering.

    The last 6 were in the freezer by the end of the day if I wasn't too tired, otherwise the next morning. Trim as much fat as possible from carcass and make sure there is no hair. Honestly couldn't tell the difference in taste or texture between the methods.

    Personally I don't want my venison to taste like beef.
     
  14. rpeerless

    rpeerless Well-Known Member

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    I agree that I do not want my venison to taste like beef either. Venison is a more delicate meat with varying flavors. I've tasted great vension and not so good vension and the information above probably explains why.
     
  15. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    I skin mine and cut it up and put in a cooler and haul around in the back of my pickup for three to five days keeping it full of ice. I was taught that this would minimize the amount of blood in the meat. I make deer jerky with most of mine and the difference between good jerky and bad is the fat and white tissue between meat groups/pods. Get it all off and you are in for some of the tasties meat. Jackie B.
     
  16. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

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    Doe prefer their bucks hung.
     
  17. ShootinSue

    ShootinSue Active Member Supporting Vendor

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    I have to agree with BigBadBob on this one however, everyone does their deer up differently according to personal preference.

    Being a meat cutter for over 30 years in Minnesota, Iowa, and Illinois, the lockers all did it the same. Deer meat does not age, it's treated like pork, cut up as soon as possible. The tenderness of the meat depends on the condition of the animal, whether it's a doe or buck, how stressed it was at the time of death, and how it was cared for after. Getting the hide off as soon as possible is very important to get the meat cooled down.

    Here is our cooler at noon opening day of shotgun last year.

    Sue
    shootinsue_2008_03038.jpg
     
  18. Pull Bang

    Pull Bang Member

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    Now here is a hanging buck!!!!!!!


    pullbang_2008_030320.jpg



    Frank
     
  19. ShootinSue

    ShootinSue Active Member Supporting Vendor

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    I have to agree with BigBadBob on this one however, everyone does their deer up differently according to personal preference.

    Being a meat cutter for over 30 years in Minnesota, Iowa, and Illinois, the lockers all did it the same. Deer meat does not age, it's treated like pork, cut up as soon as possible. The tenderness of the meat depends on the condition of the animal, whether it's a doe or buck, how stressed it was at the time of death, and how it was cared for after. Getting the hide off as soon as possible is very important to get the meat cooled down.

    Here is our cooler at noon opening day of shotgun last year.

    Sue
    shootinsue_2008_03038.jpg
     
  20. Pull Bang

    Pull Bang Member

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    Now here is a hanging buck!!!!!!!


    pullbang_2008_030320.jpg



    Frank
     
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