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Hang fire part Duex

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by ntgr8, Apr 5, 2010.

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  1. ntgr8

    ntgr8 Member

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    What would happen if as ivanhoe suggested on the OP that the gun should have been opened ????? If the hammer falls and no bang I wait at least 5 sec before opening. Having a shell go off with the chamber open doesn't sound like a good thing. I had a slam fire on a Mod 12 and the action opened with a bang(no pun intended). I would think that with a break open gun you might get a face full of 12 ga. hull. I wonder if there would be any way to make this happen in a test situation and measure the results?? For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.
     
  2. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    The pressure charge from the ignited powder would seek the path of least resistance out of the hull. A shooting partner had such a shell go off after he opened his O/U and it blew the primer and the combustion gases onto his hat brim. The crimp was barely bulged.

    MK
     
  3. ntgr8

    ntgr8 Member

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    ttt
     
  4. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    ntgr8

    "Having a shell go off with the chamber open doesn't sound like a good thing."

    All I can ask is WHY?????

    Bob Lawless
     
  5. philk

    philk Member

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    So what is the best way to handle a missfire in the middle of a shoot, take it out and toss it on the ground ??? and have the squad resume shooting. I`ve seen people take them out and pocket them but not me.
     
  6. BIGDON

    BIGDON Well-Known Member

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    That sounds like a stuck firing pin not a hang fire.

    Don
     
  7. SevenMaryThree

    SevenMaryThree Member

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    I had a 3" inch steel shot load hang fire in a Remington 870 after the bolt had unlocked.

    There was a large fireball out of the ejection port, the case split lengthwise, there was a WHOOSH!" and the shot just spilled out of the muzzle.
     
  8. 700X-user

    700X-user Member

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    Let me start my telling you that my dad was a firearm instructor during WWII.

    Besides drilling gun safety into our heads he also taught us how firearms, ammunition, and gun powder actually worked. He dismantled shotguns shells and rifle shells and taught us how everything worked. He would light the gun powder to prove to us that smokeless gun powder does not explode like a bomb.

    He also taught us that most everything you ever saw on TV regarding guns, ammo, and gun powder was bogus! These are good words to live by! I might also add that just because you heard someone spouting off at the club about hangfire shells blowing up doesn't mean it's true. Do you actually think that a shotgun shell placed into your pocket is going to blow a hole in your favorite pair of jeans? A brief history about dad:

    Dad did most of his instruction at a base in Texas. Dad was in the Army Air Corp. I believe this was the predecessor to the Air Force. Dad instructed on the Thompson Sub Machine gun, 1911, and also skeet shooting. I have a lot of old photos of dad instructing pilots to shoot skeet. "Learning to lead your target is just as important in a fighter plane as it is on the shooting range". I can't remember the number of times he used to tell me those stories. Unfortunately he is not around to tell them anymore. I remember one of the training techniques involved pilots and machine gunners being trained to shoot clays while standing in the back of a moving truck. Sounds pretty hard doesn't it?

    The Thompson Sub Machine gun was one of dads favorites. He had dozens of stories about how scared some of the soliders were. He actually had some that would refuse to even shoot it. He would demonstrate a way to shoot the gun with the butt placed against his genitals! This was his way of proving that the gun really didn't kick. They would shoot the gun themselves and realize that he hadn't actually placed the butt where they thought he had. Most of the guys would get a good laugh out of it and then the fear was forgotten. Dad actually brought a Tommy Gun home from the war, but that is another story.

    Dad respected firearms, but he also liked to show off at times. Dad could shoot a pistol in a variety of ways. He liked to impress people with his shooting. Dad taught my brother and I how to shoot a pistol with our backs to the target using a mirror. We also were taught to break 2 balloons shooting an axe head with that same S&W K 22 pistol. I know it sounds dangerous but it is just some of the things I was taught growing up. Driving NYC streets with all of those cabbies was actually the scariest thing I have ever done. I guess it is a matter of perspective. People living in NYC think nothing of it. How many of those same New Yorkers would wet their pants seeing me shoot over my shoulder with a handgun.

    Dad had a favorite demonstration that he would do whenever some know-it-all started shooting his mouth off about guns and shooting. Dad would bet the know-it-all that he could shoot a shotgun shell into a paper grocery bag and catch all of the shot. After the know-it-all put up enough money to make it interesting, dad would proceed to take the barrel off of his 20 gauge 870 wingmaster, place a loaded shell on the bolt face bunch up the top of the bag around the shell and pull the trigger. Since the shell is not in the confines of the chamber it goes off like a blooper. Most of the time the shot barely left the hull. I can't tell you how much money was won this way. We always used low brass shells. Dad always used this as an opportunity to teach someone about firearms, not just take their money. I am not encouraging anyone to do this, I only want to open the eyes of the uninformed.

    I know that some will say this is B.S.! But I have done this myself many times. The people who don't believe this are also the same people who believe that rifle, pistol, and shotgun shells are going to "GO OFF!" and kill someone when they ignite in a fire. A plastic pop bottle with the lid screwed on tight is more dangerous when placed in a fire than loose ammo.

    I don't encourage this kind of behavior and I actually thought twice before even posting this. But I believe that misinformation about how a firearm works is as dangerous as mishandling that firearm. My dad taught me to respect firearms, to love shooting firearms, and to understand their inner workings. This thread started me thinking about my dad, my childhood and my early love of guns. It all seems like a long, long time ago in a very different world than we presently live in. ED
     
  9. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    Kind of difficult trying to keep a shell held tight enough to the bolt face of an 870 with only one extractor. Maybe he was using a M-12, which has 2 extractors. I've done the M-12 trick and made a few dollars.
     
  10. 700X-user

    700X-user Member

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    GunDR,
    I still have the 870 that I was taught on. I really have no use for the gun but I will never part with it. This 870 holds more memories than I can shake a stick at.

    Ed
     
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