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***Gunsmith Advice***

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Dr.Longshot, Apr 12, 2008.

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  1. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    Contact Kreighoff at Ottsville and ask them, I had a friend whose son worked for Kreighoff after Gunsmith School, maybe it was Kreighoff schooling?

    This is a good place to start.


    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  2. Tdog

    Tdog TS Member

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    B30 I would think that the best thing to do is to figure out what type of gunsmithing you are interested in.... Shotgun, rifle or handgun. Find out who the top gunsmiths in the area of your choice and then talk to some of them. I'm sure most of them wouldn't mind giving you their opinion and some valuable advice. But I bet you've already thought of this?? Good luck.

    Tony
     
  3. Rebsmith

    Rebsmith Member

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    Lucas.....I don't know about now, but I graduated from the Colorado School of Trades back in the last century (1965) and I thought we got a well rounded exposure to the gunsmithing business. The course consisted of several departments that covered most phases of what would be encountered in a working shop. The first phase was what was called psuedo shop and was completed with 100% hand tools and fitting. This was where most "washouts" occured as patience was the most important thing and where you learned that when fitting a part, if you goofed, the part was ruined and the fitter paid the bill. I visited the school 40 years later and it seemed pretty much the same although the course had been shortened somewhat. Hope you decide to take up the trade and possibly specialize in some aspect of it as good gun mechanics are hard to find.

    Jere
     
  4. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    The best gunnsmiths I know all came from apprenticeships with great gunsmiths. Find a good one and learn the trade from the ground up with an expert supervising your work. It is a slow process and not very lucrative for a number of years but the results are the best you can get.
     
  5. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    I agree with "Rebsmith" I went through the Colorado school of Gunsmithing after college in the mid seventies. More for fun than anything else, with a whole ton of Vietnam Vets. It was a good learning experiance, with every type of gun ever made. I never pursued the trade, but I've had a lot of fun with guns ever since. That's also where I learned how to shoot trap (school club).
     
  6. claybuster38

    claybuster38 Member

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    There is a good school in Susanville,Calif. NRA approved. I go in the summer/The price is reasonable. lots of local shooting going on. Very good instructors.
     
  7. N. J. BOB

    N. J. BOB Active Member

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    It would seem to me that a background working with a machinist and or a tool & dye maker could not hurt ? Jere, would you agree ?
     
  8. coyote268

    coyote268 TS Member

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    I went to the Colorado School of Trades back in the sixties. It had excellent instructors. After school I also had the oppotunity to work for a very highly qualified gunsmith which really help me when I set up my own shop.
    Dan
     
  9. Browning Guy

    Browning Guy TS Member

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    What's the salary of a gunsmith?
     
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