1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Guns as Investments

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by mcneeley5, Aug 9, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. mcneeley5

    mcneeley5 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2008
    Messages:
    427
    I read today that this latest market downturn will lower our money market returns even more! Pretty soon I'll pay my credit union a dividend to keep my cash! I've seen some real nice iron for sale on this forum lately. What do you think the rate of return on buying some nicer guns and waiting it out might be? Maybe even a collector car or??
     
  2. flabigpapa

    flabigpapa Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2008
    Messages:
    1,469
    Location:
    N.E.Georgia Mts.
    I'm with You..Perfer to Own Iron or Steel of Some Kind...Shoot Well..Shoot Often, Bart
     
  3. jbmi

    jbmi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,452
    With the market in the toilet discretionary funds are gone for most average people and investors, I see sales of high end guns being put on hold for awhile.
    Also there is a big difference between high price guns (P&K type) and collector guns (Colt, Winchester).
    If you have extra money right now I'd look at grabbing some excellent below value stocks. I think the market will come back quicker than guns will appreciate.
     
  4. 87AA

    87AA TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    197
    The best you can hope for is that a gun's value rises with the rate of inflation and there is no guarantee that the dollar will increase when it comes time for you to sell (when you need the money). People buy diamonds and other gems not to increase their wealth but to secure their wealth.

    However guns, as with other collectibles, do increase in value as their numbers decrease. As things get lost, stolen, and destroyed, their remaining numbers become more valuable. But in the mass made market of today it takes time before the decreased numbers increase the value of the remaining items.

    And of course the future value of an item always highly dependent on the desire of the future buyer. How often have you heard "it's worth X dollars to the right collector". Buying a gun now to hopefully satisfy someones long lost past in the future is IMO not a good deal
     
  5. pdq

    pdq Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2006
    Messages:
    934
    If anyone thinks that there's no money around and that no one can afford to buy guns, you are in for a big surprise.

    Twice a year James Julia Auctions has a firearms auction that sells hundreds of pistols, rifles and shotguns, some selling for tens and hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    Their next auction is in October. If you want to check out past auctions which include pictures, descriptions and the actual prices realized, go to:

    http://jamesdjulia.com/firearms.asp#past

    Even if you aren't a buyer, just going through their catalog is amazing. Extremely good descriptions and wonderful photography.

    This is where I bought my 1929 Ithaca Knick 7E. Gun as delivered was better than described. Many investment grade guns available here.

    Pete
     
  6. warren

    warren Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    948
    Location:
    Fernley, Nevada
    Guns have always been an excelent investment and rarely recognized as such and often rise much more than inflation. Plus the fact that they can be used as opposed to the metals and coins. My XT is worth more today than what I paid for it new and I've used it for years. I totaly disagree with 87AA
    Keep your guns you might have to use them someday.

    warren
     
  7. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2010
    Messages:
    8,742
    As I have stated before. If you keep them in good shape and do not alter them to much, porting, sawing off the stock, etc., I think they are going to hold there value at minimum. As for what I would invest in now. I think stocks might be the near term option. Only because the big money may start pouring back into that market right now, because of the panic sell-off. Looks like yesterday at the end of the day was the time to get in, at this point. Then once that money is made pull it out and buy the gun of your choice. The one that makes everyone go ooohhh and ahhhh.
     
  8. billyboy07208

    billyboy07208 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    571
    You make your money when you BUY a gun,Not when you SEll it.
    You buy NIB at 5% under msrp,youll always lose.
    You buy used LNIB below book,youll never lose.

    choose wisely.
     
  9. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    8,371
    I cannot see that anything today does not put a persons investment at risk to some degree ... Guns, homes, cars, you name it and there is a risk involved which is why a lot of people are holding onto their money like never before ... The economy has an effect on everything not just a few things and the impact is becoming more and more obvious ... There are new taxes popping up all over on any and everything to try and offset the losses being realized on a daily basis ... Arizona just put a User's tax into effect on any and everything bought out of state that will be used within the State of Arizona by the owner ... Desparation is showing when the United States loses it Credit rating that it has maintained forever thanks to the current Administration who continues to travel and enjoy life as if nothing has changed but threatens to pull Political strings to again raise the Debt Limit rather than cut off the fee funding to all of the countrys on the support list ... They say invest in your future, what future ..? Enjoy life while you can because pretty soon they will find a way to tax you on the air you breathe ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  10. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,795
    I know a guy that retired and bought an airplane when he sold his Colt 45 collection.
     
  11. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    6,675
    If you see a deal, grab it. Buy low, sell high. Blue book doesn't really mean squate. The key is to know what you are looking at and if you don't, then you may really get burned!
     
  12. 4EVRYOUNG

    4EVRYOUNG Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    629
    Some say buy Gold I say you buy gold I will buy guns then when I need your gold I can take it and I will have gold and guns.
     
  13. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,482
    Location:
    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    I'm a minor-league collector in that I cannot afford the truly rare one-of-a-kind pieces but I do buy popular, quality guns like Smith & Wessons and Remingtons that are in like-new condition and were only made for short (for production guns) periods of time.

    Remington 870 Competitions were unpopular new because they were single-shot and more costly than a TC, so they only lasted five years. But they have gone from $500 guns to $800 guns over the last three years. In the opinion of deer hunters, the Model Six pump rifles were too pricey and pretty, so they also went out of production after five years. Find a nice one even in the "common" chamberings - .30-06, .270 and .308 - and you'll pay $500 for it. The two less common calibers, .243 Win and 6mm Rem, will do $600 and a NIB 6mm, the scarcest chambering, could do $700. Three years ago, I bought a like-new .243 for $450. Then there's the XP-100R, a repeater version of the famous bolt-action handgun with a Model 7 action and a fiberglass stock that is a twin, even in color, to the Kevlar stock on the Custom Shop XPs. They were only made in 1998, the last year of XP-100 production, and a bare gun will bring over a grand today. Four years ago, I paid $800 for a nearly-new .223 with a quality scope, Harris bipod and custom-made fitted case.

    Pre-internal lock S&W revolvers with forged hammers, triggers and cylinder releases in nice shape will bring close to the price of new ones. Two years ago, I was paying in the mid-400s for nice 686s - now, they sell for mid-500s. None of the above examples will provide you with retirement income but the profit margin is very good for the amount of time the money is tied up. And the best part is that they're always within reach in your safe when you feel like shooting them. After all, unless you bought one that was truly new-in-the-box, it was used when you got it so there's no harm in shooting it.

    Here's a tip for the beer-budget collectors like me: Smith & Wesson Model 19s and 66s. There are no more new ones to be had unless you stumble upon a NIB one. But very few people seem to have realized that unlike 686s, you can't buy a new 19 or 66 even with a lock and MIM parts. So they're still affordable.

    Even with the snub-nose craze that is going on right now, I paid $413 for a 2-1/2" 66 that truly is as new as a used gun gets but didn't have factory stocks (replacements were $60). That was at GunBroker.com, an auction site where you have to compete with other bidders. I also bought a mint 4" with "all the options" - target hammer, target trigger, red ramp front sight, white outline rear sight and checkered Goncalo Alves target stocks - for $450 and a 6" just like it for $432. In every case, the sellers severely understated the condition of the guns. Statements like "90% condition" (a huge devaluation), "in average condition" and "in good condition" kept bids low. I sent for more photos and in each case, saw no reason for calling those guns anything but "like-new" and was able to score good buys on them. I'd love to complete my collection of Model 66s with a 3" but they are truly rare and I watched an average one sell for $900 last weekend.

    Try to buy smart and move before everyone else wises up. This time next year, look at what Model 19s and 66s are selling for - I'll bet it's no less than $100 more than you can buy them for today.

    Ed
     
  14. OldGoat

    OldGoat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2008
    Messages:
    1,571
    Location:
    Overland Park KS
    "Buy land....they ain't making any more of it"...quote from Will Rogers, Cowboy Philosopher. Best Regards, Ed
     
  15. whiz-bang

    whiz-bang Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    Messages:
    841
    I collect vintage 22 rifles,ammo and shooting gallery items. And I can tell you this for sure "you better now what your doing". This market is ever changing. When you invest in the good and rare stuff it's hard to go wrong. A lot of the stuff in my collection has doubled or more in the last few years. Collectors will always pay more for mint and unfired new in box collectible guns.
     
  16. billyboy07208

    billyboy07208 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    571
    As far as the future,considering demographics and such,alot of high end politically acceptable guns will be exported out of here for lack of buyers.

    The big thing will be hicaps semi auto,as it is now,but forever more.
    As it should be,cant ban what every "sportsmen" own in triplicate.

    Yes i seen some 70YO men sporting uzis lately,along with aks and ars,along with 1st generation recent emmigre`. Lots of Ukraine and Russian here now,the first thing they buy are guns heavy firepower no waiting.phillipino`s,same thing.

    How many winchester lever action collectors will be left 20 yrs from now?
    colt saa,antiques? well heeled minority will have a surplus of old iron,to sip tea to, and smoke cigars.
     
  17. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,124
    Location:
    Northampton PA
    Some of the neat stuff I picked up recently I expect to do well on in the future. They include a Remington Nylon 12 at $360, a 1970 Remington Model 700 Varmint Special 6 MM at $510, a like new Super-X Model 1 Trap in the box, and a free Remington Nylon 66 black and nickel. If the market tanks I can always let the kids fight over 'em when I die!!
     
  18. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,482
    Location:
    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    6mm Rems are one of the biggest sleepers of the rifle community. Serious rifle enthusiasts know it is ballistically superior to the .243 but its early days as the .244 Rem with a slower rifling twist did it in pretty much from the get-go. Today, Remington does not chamber one production rifle for this fine cartridge except for the occasional special run, like the 1 of 250 Maple-stocked Model 7600s in 2009. Now, everyone wants a 6mm and their value has skyrocketed.

    I have a Model 700 Varmint Special like Andy's (mine was born in 1975) I bought new for $174.95, a 1976-vintage Model 700 C-grade out of the Custom Shop (a NIB $500 find in Ron Shirk's upstairs office) and a Model 700VLS. I found the latter at a small gun show two years ago brand new in the box and gladly paid $600 for it.

    Ed
     
  19. mcneeley5

    mcneeley5 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2008
    Messages:
    427
    I always figure guns are sooo easy to buy but very hard to sell! This forum seems to have the most "reasonably real" pricing for shotguns. I look at other venues of guns for sale and find it hard to believe pricing, same for the few gun shows I've been to. I feel comfortable these days investing in ammo and canned goods.
     
  20. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,795
    Most of the people on this site know the real world value of trap guns. You can get good deals here, if you pay attention and have a fast "enter" finger.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.