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Gun fit/Brusing

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by NShinn, Nov 13, 2007.

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  1. NShinn

    NShinn TS Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2007
    Messages:
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    I am pretty new to the sport--I have a Beretta 686 Onyx 12 gauge that I picked up used at a gun show a couple of years ago (for $900) that I shoot maybe once a month (wife and work allowing).

    I find that every time I go out and put a hundred rounds through it I end up with a big bruise on my cheek. I'm generally not sensitive to recoil and don't have any issues with my shoulder after shooting it, but I usually end up looking ridiculous the day after shooting with a big knot on my cheek.

    I suspect this may be a gun fit issue, but before I go out and drop $500 on a stock with an adjustable comb or spend the money on a professional fitting (which may be tough to find out here in Northern CA), I thought I would see if anyone here had thoughts on what might be causing the issue and if you thought that a stock with an adjustable comb was a good investment.

    Nate
     
  2. Ron Frazier

    Ron Frazier TS Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2006
    Messages:
    360
    Rollin.... You're up.
    Nate,
    Rollin can advise you. You may want to think about buying his book. You'll find yourself referring to it over the years. My copy has so many post its sticking out of it that it looks like a porcupine!
     
  3. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
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    Location:
    Brillion, WI
    Thanks for the referral, Ron. (Don't you wish you had invented post-its?)

    Nate:

    A number of things can cause "cheek slap", the common name for a bashed cheek.

    Adjustable combs are fine and you might need one if, to see along or slightly down-onto the rib, you have to raise your cheek off the comb a little.

    More likely, it is inadequate pitch on your stock. That describes a condition where, when you mount your gun, the bottom, pointed (toe) of the recoil pad, makes contact with your shoulder well before the top of the pad.

    The next possibility is a comb at the wring height, either having to use too much pressure to align your eye with the rib or as mentioned above, having to raise your cheek off the comb to align your eye vertically with the rib.

    Another cause is mounting your gun too low and having to tilt your head and neck down and forward to place your cheek on the comb.

    Something else is shooting with the majority of your weight on your back foot.

    Finally, there is the possibility of mounting your gun too far out on your shoulder and having to turn your head too far toward the stock to place your cheek on the comb and align your eye with the rib. Both this and tilting your head forward makes your cheek contact the comb with the forward part with the most pain receptors.

    Rollin
     
  4. NShinn

    NShinn TS Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2007
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    Thanks for the feedback, Rollin. Looks like I have a steep learning curve here. I went ahead and ordered a copy of your book, which I’m sure will be invaluable.

    Based on your advice above, I suspect the problem my be inadequate pitch. I am relatively tall (6’1") and thin with broad shoulders, and have felt that I do need to tilt my head and neck down and forward to place me cheek on the comb. I also feel like I have to jam my face into the comb a little to align with the rib, but it seems like increasing the pitch may help with respect to this as well.

    I need to replace my current stock anyway as it is slightly asymmetrical (for a right handed shooter) and I intend to learn to shoot left handed as I am left eye dominant and haven’t been at this long enough to make it hard to relearn. Given that I may need some additional pitch and may also need to adjust the comb, do you think it’s worthwhile to look into an stock with an adjustable comb and buttplate (I have seen a few postings for them here lately) or would I be better off just trying to pick up a standard 680 series stock that’s not asymmetrical and work with that?
     
  5. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Brillion, WI
    Nate;

    Your book was mailed today.

    The pitch on your gun can be corrected with or without the installation of an adjustable comb. (See below.)

    I suspect that you need to either raise your gun mount or install a pad adjuster. An adjuster would allow you to lower the recoil pad to allow a more upright head and neck position. (It might also require a shorter stock.

    An adjustable comb if you have one installed, will apparently need the ability to be lowered below its current position/height. This will eliminate having to use so much cheek pressure to vertically align your eye with the rib. Lowering the comb can be done by removing a slice of wood between the adjustable portion of the comb and the stock, below it. Make the comb installer aware of your need, however.

    Something else that might help with both your head position and having to use excessive pressure of your cheek on the comb would be to raise your gun mount. The heel (top) of the recoil pad should be even or nearly even with the top of your shoulder. That in turn, just might allow your cheek to make contact with the comb differently and reduce the needed cheek pressure - and then again, it might not. You would have to try it.

    Your current stock may be able to be bent to make it neutral in cast or cast "on" for left-handed shooting. It may also be able to be inletted to the receiver or action differently to do the same thing.

    Rollin
     
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