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** Grounding a reloader ??

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by rob111, Nov 17, 2009.

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  1. rob111

    rob111 Member

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    I know this must have been covered.. I missed it .. Please -what is the best way to ground.. Respectfully , Rob Mize
     
  2. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    Rob.. I drove a 6' copper grounding rod into the earth right outside my loading room. Cleaned the paint off one corner of the MEC and ran a copper wire from it to the ground. worked great, no problems.... Dan Thome (Trap2)
     
  3. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Most wall outlets have a ground tab in the lower left corner with a green screw in it - it's visible if you just remove the outlet cover. If you connect a wire from your loader to that screw, the loader will be grounded through your home wiring.

    Ed
     
  4. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Active Member

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    Rather than poking around inside a receptacle box just attach an eye terminal to the end of your ground wire and put it under the screw that holds on the cover plate; it goes to the same ground.

    MK
     
  5. vpr80

    vpr80 Active Member

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    Inform me...why ground a reloader?
     
  6. 221

    221 Well-Known Member

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    Urban myth.....Waste of time.....We have all heard of reloaders blowing up shotguns, but never a reloader blowing itself up....HeHeHeh
     
  7. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    If people would humidify their reloading area, all the static problems will go away. If you notice, nobody has problems in the warm months when the air is humid.

    The static charge that is present in new powder jugs can be eliminated by letting it breath a bit before dumping powder into the loader.

    ss
     
  8. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    MK, that is correct IF the cover screw isn't plastic, which most newer ones are. Then there is no contact with the outlet's ground.

    Substances develop an electrostatic discharge by rubbing against another surface. Powder does that simply by sliding through your loader unless the humidity in the area is controlled or the loader is grounded.

    If your loader is operated by an AutoMate, it is grounded by being attached to a grounded electrical device.

    Ed
     
  9. threedeuces

    threedeuces TS Member

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    If your lucky and the room you reload im is not finished off you can ground your reloader to the copper water piping in your house.
     
  10. Hoosier Daddy

    Hoosier Daddy TS Member

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    Use an anti static dryer sheet. Rub he tube with it and hang a piece inside the tube.
     
  11. trapshootin hippie

    trapshootin hippie Well-Known Member

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    Maybe we need to ground our shotguns too. Might keep so many from blowing up. Static electricity trapped inside the shell while being loaded seems like the culprit to me. I can just see it now, a ground rod at each station and the puller won't turn the voice calls on till each shooter has attached the ground wire to the trigger guard. Gotta idiot-proof the game ya know.


    Gne J
     
  12. birddog1964

    birddog1964 TS Member

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    using any outlet will work as long as the outlet has a ground hole or 3 hole plug, run a wire from the screw that hold the outlet cover on {the screw grounds not the cover} to the base of your loader and you are grounded.

    thanks
    lee
     
  13. 8 Straight

    8 Straight Member

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    I found a better way yet. I had a lot of trouble with a 28 gauge loader, going so far as to spray Static-Guard in the hopper, hanging a piece of fabric softner sheet in the hopper, and running a ground wire. Nothing worked. I stopped using 800X, and what do you know, the static problem went away. 800X must be the most static powder ever made. Anyone else ever have a problem with it? RK Miller
     
  14. vpr80

    vpr80 Active Member

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    Still have no idea what you guys are talking about...what exactly happens?
     
  15. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    Gne J

    I think you may be onto something there. I believe there may be a market for grounding wires. Different colors for different shotguns and makes of loaders. Plain, flamed finish, gold for the big spenders. etc.

    CG better look into this problem also, it may have caused them a lot of unwarranted, bad publicity.

    Maybe the potential for a class action suit against everyone who has sold a loader and didn't furnish a ground wire. Lots of possibilities here.
     
  16. Bill D.

    Bill D. Member

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    I ran a copper wire from my reloader to a water pipe that runs behind it. I used copper connections from my local home improvement store.
     
  17. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    Here is a thread from a month ago. For your reading enjoyment. Wayne
     
  18. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Active Member

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    <blockquote>"MK, that is correct IF the cover screw isn't plastic, which most newer ones are. Then there is no contact with the outlet's ground."</blockquote>

    I'll take your word for that, Ed. I moved into my new house in August and all 56 receptacle screws and 66 switch plate screws in it are steel. Musta got old stock.

    MK
     
  19. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Active Member

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    <blockquote>"Still have no idea what you guys are talking about...what exactly happens?"</blockquote>

    Did you ever put your hands on a Van deGraff generator in science class and have your hairs all stand on end? That's what happens if your loader isn't grounded; the powder flakes all stand straight up and refuse to move.

    MK
     
  20. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    I've found the best way to control static is to control the humidity. Winter is usually the issue, so a small humidifier can work wonders. Dehumidifier in the summer if the humidity is very high, but that has little to do with static.

    Grounding the press is ok, as long as you have frequent contact with it to dissipate static from your body. The 1 Meg Ohm resistor is a MUST! All of the ESD grounding straps and mats use the resistor, whether in the individual device or located at a central connection point. It allows static to dissipate, while limiting current. A water pipe ground might be the best point to ground to. I don't usually trust house wiring, unless you have the means to verify the ground. You can put antistatic mats in the bottom of the bins holding your hulls and wads if you really want to get involved in all of that, or place the bins on top of one of those mats.

    Using a grounding device for the press operator is another option. The wrist band style used for ESD applications would work. They usually have the 1 Meg Ohm resistor built in. They have simple clip ons and some that actiuallt test and make contact with the ground in the house wiring. An anti-static mat is another option. You stand on it while operating the press. These have the 1 Meg Ohm resistor in series, unless they are designed to be connected to a central dedicated circuit with the resistance already in the line.
    I posted a lot of this before.

    The point is to add the resistor in series, or buy a device that already has one.
     
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