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Ground wire for reloader?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by RAScott, Dec 14, 2009.

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  1. RAScott

    RAScott Member

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    I Went to the club sunday for some practice. I recently reloaded about 700 rounds. While shooting the loads the sound was all over the place extreamly light loads to regular loads, two in a row were light allot of unburned powder in the barrel.


    Do you think that the problem may be static electricity during the reloading process?

    I checked the loader and charge bar all is good. The temp was about 35-40 outside and the loads were in my basement prior to heading to the club.

    Should I install a ground wire to a water pipe as suggested at the club? What do most of you do?
     
  2. Frank C

    Frank C Well-Known Member

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    Cactus bob, it won't help.......what were the loads? Wads Powder??
     
  3. RAScott

    RAScott Member

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    AA hulls, winchester 209 primers, clay buster AA replacement wad, Claydot 17.1 grains 1/18 oz #8's
     
  4. RAScott

    RAScott Member

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    clay dot about 17.1 grains. sounded like a pop gun and very lite recoil, allot of snickers on the line. a fellow shooter sugested a ground wire to a water pipe.
     
  5. Frank C

    Frank C Well-Known Member

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    Bob, what does the data call for fps at that recipe? I loaded 2 flats of shells a year ago with 16.5 gr of 700 X and some Claybuster/windjammer wads, I just finished the last of these "practice" rounds, same as you describe, 5 or six/box that popped, and broke the birds with a noticable delay and snicker.....bumping up the powder to closer than 1200 fps and no more issues.....
    see you Wed night, dress up, gonna be 15F and WINDY FC
     
  6. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    Bob, With the weather we've had, you didn't have any moisture in any hulls by chance. It wouldn't take much. Look forward to seeing you soon, I hope. Bob
     
  7. mkstephen

    mkstephen Active Member

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    I load basically the same load as you except I use Remington STS hulls & Fig8 wads.

    STS hulls, Winchester 209 primers, clay buster Fig8 wad, Claydot 17.0 grains 1/18 oz #8's.

    This load chrono's at 1170 fps through my Caesar Guerini 34" barrel (.735 bore 0.35 full choke) and over my ProChrono.

    I get no poppers. I shot at the club two Saturday's ago when it was 19 degrees out and no poppers.

    I might suggest to you to look at your wad guide and make sure it's intact. Take it out and push a wad into it and make sure the fingers are OK. Many times the wad guide will crack and be unnoticeable until you push a wad through it. Likewise loading several shells and tearing them down will allow you to observe the wad powder cup. Make sure the wad powder cup is not getting frayed when being inserted into the shell as that will cause poppers because the powder pressure will blow on by the cup.

    Michael Stephenson
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Attach a ground wire to a water pipe if you wish. It won't help anything but it will not hurt anything. As suggested, remove your wad guide and examine it with care. Look for splits in the upper edge as well as damaged fingers. Weigh several powder drops. At times things can get stuck in the powder drop tube.


    I am sorry you loaded 700 rounds that may have defective shells. I have done similar things. You may have 700 practice rounds loaded.

    Pat Ireland
     
  9. RAScott

    RAScott Member

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    Hulls, were all once fired, fist time reloaded. and stored in a empty target box for around 3 months maybe. i dont think that there was moisture in them.
    I will try some again and your right 700 practice rounds. just thought it was funny I never have bloopers. i will look at the fingers.

    Bob S
     
  10. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    Here's one for the "ground your loader" crowd to ponder/explain:

    I use aluminum tape to adjust the volume of my P-W powder bushings (saw that on TS.com). If I use a strip, say, 3/8' wide and the length of the bushing, I need to burnish it onto the bushing bore to make sure it is firmly stuck to the inside of the bushing.

    If I burnish the tape with a piece of 1/4" drill rod, I generate a static charge that will make powder passing through the bushing stick only to the tape like the quills on a porcupine. If I swab the tape with mineral spirits on a cotton swab, the charge disappears. If I instead burnish the tape with a 1/4" wood dowel, no charge even develops. If I simply swap the charged bushing for a different bushing, no static is present.

    Puzzling!

    MK
     
  11. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    I would forget the tape. The bushings will get you close enough to make no real difference. The tape is just a potential source of more trouble than it is worth.
     
  12. TjayE

    TjayE Member

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    I often wonder about the Quality of our reloading components these days. Years ago there were very few, if any, odd sounding reloads and unburned powder left in the barrel. We had cold winters 10, 20 years ago, and we shot reloaded shotshells without any problems. Here of late, there seems to be a lot of bad sounding reloads and everything from powder, wads, primers, and wad pressure have been blamed for the shotshell problems. Are we trying to reload too lite? Not enough powder? I wish I knew the answer. Tom
     
  13. TEXASZEPHYR

    TEXASZEPHYR Member

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    WE dont have mercury primers any more. think its major cause of most of the problems. Understand that new type primers are a lot harder to get consistent ignition from

    Bob
     
  14. below 0

    below 0 TS Member

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    I've had the same problem in the past and found that it was due to poor "claybuster" wads and an oversized bore. I've since went to AA wads from Winchester and changed nothing else and corrected the problem. The "cheap" wads work great in the heat of the Summer, but fail miserably when the temps drop. lol Odie
     
  15. skeeljc

    skeeljc Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    Your problem is most likely the Claybuster wads. They are made out of a different type of plastic (how do you think they sell them so cheap). The plactic preforms o.k in warm weather but gets hard and brittle in cold conditions. Your light sounding loads are caused by the wad not sealing properly.

    How do I know this? I was chronographing loads 10-12 degree temps. When I was ready to pack up I noticed the wads were laying on top of the snow. Being a curious fellow I picked them up and examined them. The Winchester and Federal wads looked good enough to load again. The Claybuster wads were fractured between the shot cup and the base. That, along with all the plastic build up in my chokes made me quit using Claybusters.

    Jim Skeel
     
  16. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Both powder burning rates and the plastic is some wads can be affected by temperature. But RAScott stated he was shooting in 35-40 degree temperature. That should not be low enough to cause major problems.

    Jim- I have not seen the problems you saw with Claybuster wads, but I have never shot them at the low temperatures you did. Like the wads you saw, I believe my body would crack and split at 10 degrees.

    Pat Ireland
     
  17. fitchhall

    fitchhall TS Member

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    I had a similar problem a few years ago and spent a lot of time focusing on every detail of the components. I was using a MEC 650. A fellow shooter suggested installing a powder baffle. This is a cheap (less than $10.00) and easy piece that screws between the powder bottle and the charge bar assembly. This solved the problems immediately and has been working ever since.
     
  18. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    Jim Skeel, Very interesting observation. Thank you, Bob
     
  19. skeeljc

    skeeljc Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    Pat, when you live in Fargo and ALL the shooting ranges are closed in the Winter months you find some excuse to get out and burn some powder.

    Jim Skeel
     
  20. CharlesK80

    CharlesK80 Member

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    Back to the original question. My MEC 9000 is grounded as a matter of course. To a basement water pipe. But the plastic powder bottle still appears to suffer static electricity. Now, that said, I use a very similar load to RAScott and do not have weak sounding loads in the winter. 12 deg F right now.
     
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