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Grip pressure

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by glenns, Nov 20, 2009.

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  1. glenns

    glenns Member

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    I'm a relatively new trap shooter - just started this February. I noticed that when I miss a couple shots in a row I will start to tense up and my grip on the gun will get tighter. This interferes with a smooth move to the bird and in some cases I'll jerk the gun just before shooting. When I realize this and loosen my grip my move and trigger pull smooths out.

    On a scale of 1-10 (10 being a death grip) how tight do you grip the gun?
     
  2. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    It's all individual and subjective, but Kay Ohye says enough pressure or strength to pick up a gallon of milk...or put another way, pretend you're picking your gun up out of the rack with one hand. That's the amount of grip pressure to apply with each hand. Figure about 8~9 lbs. force each. I don't consider that a death grip.

    I've found nothing wrong with this rule and would have no problem recommending it to a beginner. (Some Orvis-gay types will say your forearm hand should grip the forearm as gently as a chicken egg...but they're mostly fullaschitt anyway).
     
  3. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    A 2 on my single barrel trap, 3 on my auto and o/u. Maybe a 4 when I'm shooting 5 stand, because a use a low gun hold. Wayne
     
  4. glenns

    glenns Member

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    Buzz - sounds like a 5-6?
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Kay Ohye started me gripping both the pistol grip and the forend fairly tight. I believe it helps me control the gun better. Also, my hands can absorb much recoil if they grip the gun firmly.

    Pat Ireland
     
  6. glenns

    glenns Member

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    Pat - don't you naturally tighten the grip when you pull the trigger?

    If you initially have a tight grip doesn't that make it hard to swing smooth to the bird?
     
  7. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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  8. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    I'm starting to like quite a lot of grip pressure, seven or so on your scale, Scott. Like Pat, I think gives me "more control" but that's not quite it. It's more like when I just hold it loosely I just swing the gun in the proper direction, say left and up, and pull the trigger. When I really grip it, I move it a particular place rather than just "east" and the whole thing at least gives me the impression that I am trying to hit something, not just empty the shell.

    Neil
     
  9. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    I personally think shotgun control comes directly through the trigger hand. Firm but certainly not a death grip works for both my release and pull triggers. Hand in hand with the firm grasp (on both grip/forearm) is a well seated in the pocket stock which helps the upper body and gun move as a single unit for me. Pushing or pulling with the leading hand in an attempt to get the jump on a clay is bad medicine, you have more time than most think to smoke a clay by taking a good look at it first.

    Hap
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    glenns- Yes, I naturally tighten the grip when I pull the trigger. I hold this tight grip until I release the trigger and the gun goes off. What is more controversial than my tight grip with my trigger hand is my rather tight grip with my left hand on the forend. Kay Ohye got me to grip my gun very firmly with both hands. Most shooters seem to have a very loose forend grip.

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    I remember Brad Dysinger saying he grips the forearm pretty good, too...Brad?
     
  12. RV4driver

    RV4driver TS Member

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    Phil K. told me it should be like you were shaking hands with sincerity.

    I've found that if I'm gripping the stock, and pulling it into the pocket, I pull the trigger better, smoother. Any Bullseye Pistol shooter will tell you that a firm grip on the grip will allow a better, "disconnected" trigger pull. The trigger finger is not moving the whole hand.
    i.e. the trigger finger won't affect the grip movement as much, or at all, if you're really good. I'm only kinda good, so not so much with me. Darn.

    Jeff
     
  13. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    On the forearm hand,just enough to prevent the gun from recoiling out of my hand... too much causes me to jerke the gun...
     
  14. comp 1

    comp 1 Well-Known Member

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    Wow,another something to think about--foot placement,soft focus,aligning the beads,swinging from the waist,wait til you see the target well,keeping your head down,now the proper grip pressure--how do we ever hit a target with all that to think about?
     
  15. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    The best way to teach someone the proper amout of grip on a gun, is have them shoot doubles with a slide gun.

    They will learn what it takes to keep the gun stable, while pumping, going to the second bird.

    The funny side of this is, shooting doubles after an application of Pledge to the furniture. I've been known to swing the gun and have my left arm flailing about trying to get back ahold of the forearm.

    ss
     
  16. vpr80

    vpr80 Active Member

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    I used to hold with a light grip...now I tightened my grip up and I seem to be getting better results. I hold it firm, but not to the point where muscle tension is causing a "shake".
     
  17. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Not an all out death grip but more like when you shake hands with a buddy and you don't want him to think you are an out of shape wussy. Mr. Kiner checked the handshakes of our class and made reccomendations to each student based on that. Most of the time he advised more pressure.
     
  18. IcySwan1

    IcySwan1 TS Member

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    I was told to use the same pressure you would use to shake hands with a lady lawyer. Your squeeze may vary.
    Mike
     
  19. Texshooter

    Texshooter Member

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    Forearm pressure: zero

    stock grip :two-three and less when the release goes off.

    Shoulder soakes up the recoil. If I grip the forearm, I return to skeet shooting and swing the gun instead of turning my body. AJ
     
  20. glenns

    glenns Member

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