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Grinding pad to fit - belt sander

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by dmarbell, Nov 8, 2007.

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  1. dmarbell

    dmarbell Active Member

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    I have a new pad and spacer plates for my 303. The only belts I have for my sander are 60s. Before I ruin a spacer or two: what grits work best for grinding spacers and also for pads?

    Danny
     
  2. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Danny, I would rough shape the pad with a band saw. Then rough sand with a worn 100 grit or a new 120 grit. when the pad is very close, I begin to use finer grits to get rid of the scratch marks. Begin with 150 and go progressively finer until they are gone. It may require something between 320 and 500 to get a nice surface. Then a little final polishing with a buffing compound and you are done. Fitting a pad or a spacer is a very messy but rather simple job. I would mount the belt sander and move the spacer by hand over the belt.

    Pat Ireland
     
  3. dmarbell

    dmarbell Active Member

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    Pat,

    Thanks. I've never done this, and I'm a little nervous about getting started. I'll have to go and get the different grits. Also have to find a band saw.

    Danny
     
  4. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    I use an aluminum disk mounted to my radial arm saw motor to shape pads using 120 grit paper and a very light touch. I then finish the pad by wet sanding it with 320 grit "wet/dry" paper. The radial saw motor is a bit fast for such work at 3600 RPM. Half that speed would be better.

    I rough-cut spacers on a band saw and finish shape and polish them with sanding drums in a drill press.

    Morgan
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Danny- Ask around at your club. There are probably several others who have done this job before and they will help you. They actually might do the job for you while you watch. I use a 60 inch vertical belt sander to fit pads. The pad can be fit in around 5 minutes and cleaning up the mess takes about 30 minutes.

    Pat Ireland
     
  6. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    Danny.....Depending on the pad you are fitting, here is another good tip. Put the pad in the freezer overnight. Freezing the pad makes it rock solid and much easier to work with. Just like shaping a block of soft wood rather than soft rubber....Dan Thome.(Trap2)
     
  7. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Use 80 grit to shape the pad and then go finer to smooth and polish.
     
  8. trap junkie

    trap junkie TS Member

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    when you guys do the pad, do you use the jig, such as Midway sells? Or, do you do it all by "eye"? I will be putting a new pad on one of my doubles and want a good fit.

    Thanks, Jim
     
  9. $$$SHTR

    $$$SHTR Member

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    If you have a 1 inch belt sander go to golfsmith.com and order a linen belt, ($4.00)that golfers used to finish the ferrels on golf clubs. Works perfect every time on any type pad. Also, if you finish sand holding the pad on the long side to the belt, (vs sanding across the pad), almost all marks will disapear.

    Tomas
     
  10. Beancounter

    Beancounter TS Member

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    Just my opinion but I believe recoil pads are a bit on the pricey side for experimentation. To learn how to set the toe and how to blend the toe, try it with a chunk of wood before going to work on a $50 pad
     
  11. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    Have gun, good tip. For the price I was quoted to have a few pads fitted to my guns...I bought a small table top belt sander from sears has belt and disc sander on side. Fitted all guns myself. I tried the jig, but seem to do better with free hand. I still go to the high quote gun smith for my hard part gun smith repairs but some jobs I cant stand to pay for. Plus the belt sander has been more useful than I thought. If the replacement pad needs a lot of material removed A good band saw is great. If not go heavy on the grit and be carful. I had a lot of fun fitting my guns. I practiced on old pads to different guns. ex, I took a pad off my 870 and ground to fit my little 22 plinker.
     
  12. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    I install pads and I normally throw Kick-Eez in the freezer for a while before sanding down on my 12" disc sander.

    I have both of the above, but with the B&R because I can get both the correct angle on the bottom of the pads, AND I can also duplicate the outward taper on the pads as it slopes away from the back of the stock. The B-Square jig only gives you the ability to duplicate the bottom slope of the pad, but not the gradual taper. I've not used the Gunsmither jig.

    [​IMG]

    IMHO.

    WW
     
  13. les morgan

    les morgan TS Member

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    Everyone has their own little twists. I have had the best results using a jig. I use a b-square, but Whiz has a good point on the B&R. Just don't tighten the cap screws holding the pad to the jig any more than necessary or the pad buldges and after grinding off the buldge the pad will be concave on the sides after releasing it. I use an upright 4x36 belt sander with 80 or 100 grit to rough grind the pad close to the scribe marks. Then switch to a 220 to take it to the marks. Finish the sides by hand sanding with 220 wet or dry paper while keeping the pad wet with WD40. The WD40 makes the hand sanding go quick and easy.
     
  14. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Like many jobs, people usually develop a system that works best for them when fitting a pad. I would advise that nobody use the system that I have successfully used many times. Other experienced stock fitters have indicated that my way is possibly the worst possible way they can envision. But, I have fitted a few hundred pads with no problem.

    I use a 60 X 6 inch belt on a vertical edge sanding machine. I put a layer of Duck tape around the wood next to the over sized pad. I shape the pad while it is fastened to the stock. I sand until the belt just scuffs the outer surface of the tape and then finish it by hand. With my method, one little slip and a stock gets a gouge. But, with no little slips, my method does a fine, and quick, job.

    Pat Ireland
     
  15. code5coupe

    code5coupe Well-Known Member

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    You won't ruin a pad using 60grit belts. That's what I use. Going to 120grit simply adds time to the process.
    I don't even finish up with finer grit. The "rubber" part doesn't take a polish and the "plastic" part of the pad looks nice and satin-y with the 60grit....since, by the time you get to the last part, the belt will be somewhat loaded up and will be less than full 60 grit coarseness anyway.
     
  16. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    I use 100 grit)verticle belt), and then finish by hand. After several hundred, you'll be able to grind the pad, onto the scribed mark, leaving very little hand work.

    Just a hint....before applying any tape to the stock, give it a good coat of paste wax. This helps prevent the tape from pulling any finish off when being removed. The older Brownings and some of the newer Berettas are good for this.

    Doug
     
  17. MGeslock

    MGeslock TS Member

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    As always, Whiz comes through with the the photo. I have the B&R. It gets the taper on the pad.

    Screw the pad on the stock. Then scribe a line around the wood. Remove and put on the jig. Grind it.

    It took abit to set up the jig on my sander. Once it is set up, it is good to go.
     
  18. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    Whiz- i've been looking @ the b&r for awhile to do those odd recoil pad jobs (and maybe some for the guys @ the club for some spare shooting $), but can't invision how this attaches to the sander. Can you post a pic of your setup so I can get an idea of how it works?
     
  19. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    Skeet-man: You have to drill and tap, well I did, a hole to accept the hook shaft. The newer hook shafts are MUCH thinner than the older original ones from 20 years ago. The newer ones tend to bend some. Older hooks shafts had same threads as a GM lug bolt... don't remember what that was at this moment, but was not metric. Newer ones are smaller.

    Mark Geslock's comments are correct. Only thing I'll add is that after I scribe a mark on the back of the pad, (I use an X-Acto knife turned backwards), I fill the mark with white tire marking crayon. Helps me see the grind-to line a bit better.

    With the B&R jig, you can't bulge the pad like I've done on the B-Square jig. Reason is that the B&R uses screws (I use stainless) that go through the holes in the pad and anchor on the plate inside the pad.

    I cut slits in the pad's surface AFTER running an awl up through it from the plate side and mark where it would protrude. I then use some Vaseline and then cut a couple of slits for the screws to go through. At the very least you should use WD-40 or some lube when you insert screws through the pad.

    I sell a pad anchoring system much like the ones in Shotgun Sports mag that anchor in the stock, are sandable metal, and take a 10-28 cap head Allen screw.

    Whiz
     
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