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Good story about my dad and a horse

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Jim Porter, Apr 14, 2010.

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  1. Jim Porter

    Jim Porter Well-Known Member

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    Saw a thread about the American Sportsman on here and thought about my dad. About 50 years ago whan I was 15, we lived on a Alabama farm. We always hunted and we had horses. One Sunday afternoon in the spring when flowers were blooming and birds singing, and it was good to just be alive, we watched Curt Gowdy and Phil Harris quail hunting with horses. Later that day dad, decided that he would teach Molly, our saddle mare, to accept a gunshot from the hurricane deck. Dad wasn't too concerned as he could ride anything. I gave him his 30-06 and as he adjusted his hat, he suggested that I move back as he was sure Molly would bolt when he fired. Now he was on bareback and only had a piece of bailing twine around her nose. He was right, she took off like a bolt of lighting when he turned the rifle skyward and fired. I watched in amazement as he almost fell off the rump end of the horse and then got set back upright and setteled in. By this time Molly was about 100 yards distant and really kicking up dust. I saw him bolt the rifle and again fire toward the Heavens. Molly stopped! STOPPED!! Dead still! Dad hit the ground about 20 feet further along and I culd see an arm or leg go over the top of the dust for about another 20 yards. The rifle went one way and the hat another. I knew I just whitnessed the death of my dad. He got up, dusted off, regained the rifle and hat and started walking back toward me and the barn. It was a slow trip. Molly tagged along behind him every step of the way.

    Now my dad was my very best friend and he did not say bad words. He passed about 10 feet from me and as if on a second thought he looked my way and said "Don't you say a G.D. word". I think if I had just smiled he would have killed me. Molly was never used as a shooting platform again and Curg Gowdy went to his grave never knowing that I always smiled inwardly for a second when I saw him or heard his name. Dad has ben gone now for 35 years and I still recall this as if it were this mornong and boy do I still miss him!
     
  2. SeldomShoots

    SeldomShoots Active Member

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    Good times, good memories and good laughs when you see something unfold that is predictable to every one but the person doing it, and no one gets hurt. One question: you dad sounded fine, just stoved up with a hurt ego; but how did the rifle and scope, (if it had one), fair when Molly put on the brakes?

    John E.
     
  3. andybull

    andybull Active Member

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    Good story. My Dad passed away when I was 11, I'm 59 now, I miss him to this day.

    Andy
     
  4. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    Great story!

    Thanks for sharing.

    Hauxfan!
     
  5. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    Great story Jim. Isn't it great to look back and be able to say your folks were your best friends? God Bless and shoot well, Bob
     
  6. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Good story and thanks for sharing.

    Your dad certainly didn't lack courage.
     
  7. dward

    dward Member

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    My father in law passed about 3 years ago, and I'll always remember a similar horse conversation we had. He had seven daughters and a group of us son in laws would (still do) go elk hunting every year with horses that were kept on his farm. I always remember how he answered me when I asked about shooting off of a horses back, if we were to ever see an elk while riding.

    He told me I'd have no problem shooting off any of the horses backs..........once.........and when it was all said & done, there'd be a good chance both the elk and whomever shot would both be dead!
     
  8. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    Great story. How fortunate for you to have a dad like that.

    I remember those days of The American Sportsman. Hunters back then were often sportsmen who behaved that way. For way too many today's hunters view hunting as mere entertainment, and their behavour reflects that.
     
  9. need to shoot more

    need to shoot more Active Member

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    I miss my Dad, passed 21 years ago and I just hit 46.Nice story.
     
  10. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    I worked with an amazing trainer when I was employed at the Maryland Park Police barn...his name is Sergeant Rick Pelicano. I watched him de-spook our mounted patrol horses. He would start from the far end of the arena firing blanks into the sand. With the horses lined up with their handlers at the opposite end, he would walk slowly closer and closer, firing periodically. It's amazing how quickly you can train a horse to stand still during stressful events. He wrote a book about his training methods, for anyone who is interested.
     
  11. BILL GRILL

    BILL GRILL Well-Known Member

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    Awsome! Makes you laugh and puts a tear in your eye. Bill
     
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