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Glock After Market Barrel

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by ronbo142, Jan 4, 2010.

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  1. ronbo142

    ronbo142 TS Member

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    Question for you pistol shooters specifically Glock related.

    I recently purchased my first Glock 21C, the process used to make a Glock Barrel requires that you do not shoot unjacketed bullets. Additionally Glock in order to increase its reliability allows for significant loose tolerance in the chamber.


    With that said, my goal is to identify a manufacture of a aftermarket ported barrel for my Glock. I want to shoot unjacketed ammo that I reload. I am aware that I will have to do extra work when loading but that is all good for me.


    Anyone have opinions or real experience of who you would recommend.

    <br>
    Thanks

    <br>
    Ronbo
     
  2. Jerbear

    Jerbear TS Member

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    You mat get a quicker answer here.


    Jerbear
     
  3. ronbo142

    ronbo142 TS Member

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    Jabear

    I read posting on that site last night so I am now reaching further.

    Thanks

    Ronbo
     
  4. BFJ201

    BFJ201 TS Member

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    Second for Lone Wolf.

    <a href="http://www.lonewolfdist.com" target="_blank"> Lone Wolf Distributors </a>

    I have one in my G20 as well it feeds just as reliably as my factory barrel and while loading hot 10mm's it saves some where and tear on the brass as the case is more fully supported.

    James Allen
     
  5. Titan Trap Team

    Titan Trap Team Member

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    KKM is my barrel of choice, excellent quality. See above link to KKM website. Mark Richards
     
  6. dog easy

    dog easy TS Member

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    Very happy with my Bar-Sto barrel. The good news is there are a bunch of good ones out there. See above post. You're smart not to shoot lead in your Glock.

    Shoot safe, John
     
  7. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    I use a Storm Lake barrel to shoot lead bullets in my G-17. I am in the market for a used G-21, let us know what you get and how it works out.
     
  8. woodsman

    woodsman TS Member

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    I used the Lonewolf barrel in my Glock 27. Worked great.
     
  9. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    I have shot many thousands of cast bullets through my Glocks with no ill effcts, but apparently I'm not very smart. I don't shoot hot loads because of the unsupported area of the chamber. Glock barrels are much easier to clean than traditional barrels.

    Saying I can't shoot cast bullets is like saying I also can't shoot reloads, BS.
     
  10. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    If you are going to shoot bare lead bullets thru a Glock barrel you need to Pay attention to lead deposits in the bore, this is where the problems start. If your bullets are soft enough and don't have bevel bases, and you keep them in the 850 fps range, you probably won't experience leading problems with .45ACP.

    This is the consideration they are warning against. With a .45 you probably won't have any problems with any load that functions correctly in a 1911. .45ACP is one of the easiest pistol cases to reload, add Bullseye, and a cast bullet and be done with it.

    For the most part leading in cartridges that don't have gas checks on the bullets is caused by gas escaping by the base of the bullet. This situation is caused by the bullet not obturating or upsetting to seal the bore at the moment of firing. As the gas goes by it solders lead to the bore. This condition is made worse by bevel base bullets, and worse yet by hardcast bullets ran at too slow a speed since they don't upset at all.

    I have seen arguements by very knowledgable gun guys on both side of the hard vs, soft bullets in auto loaders. Some say Linotype hard cast 22+ bnh others say Wheel Weight soft 10-12 bnh. If you are casting or swaging your own bullets then I guess you have to experiment, otherwise I'd buy Ranier plated bullets from Midway, and not have this problem, The price is a wash with casting or swaging if your time is worth anything. $10-12/100

    The over pressure problem would show itself in a .40S&W if you severly leaded the bore with hard cast bullets and then shot a factory jacketed round with out removing the lead. The pressure of a .40 is 35,000 psi to start with, and a .45 is more like 21,000 psi. So the leading problem will be more of a issue with the higher pressure round. Same with 9MM 35,000 psi, but the chamber walls are thicker on 9MM barrels so they can absorb a little more pressure and not come apart.

    Also I have heard from people who are around Glocks everyday that not that many have actually blown up,(2-3) and most were .40's. and nobody ever actually figured out if it was attributed to reloads (double charge) or bad heat-treating of the barrels. I know people who reload .40S&W cases a dozen times and never do anything to the cases but run them thru a Dillon loader, and then fire tham in Glocks with no problems whatsoever.

    You're right the chambers are looser on Glocks, that's so they will feed anybodies ammo. Mine is +.005 over other .40's I own. In the Glock.40 this shows itself as bulged cases near the base. My Para 1640-LDA doesn't bulge cases very much at all. I presize the cases using a Lee taper crimping die with the carbide insert, and the crimper removed. I push the cases all the way thru to remove the bulge. Redding sells a die specifically for this for like $35. The bulged case problem is not a problem with .45ACP due to the lower pressure, but you can still presize the cases like above if you want.

    Just about any of the aftermarket barrels will work, but the problem with leading will be in the load not the barrel. Glock barrels are hammer forged and have very smooth inside surfaces. I don't see how this is more conducive to leading than Cut rifled or Button rifled bore. I don't think lead gives a shit about the shape of rifling lands.

    In any event the .45ACP will probably not give you any problems due to the low pressure. Just pay attention and look at the bore frequently until you are sure of your loads.

    Handloader magazine discusses all of these points in detail frequently and I would suggest this source for argueably the best and most complete reloading information available.

    I hope this helps.

    Randy
     
  11. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Randy, My Glocks are 40 S&W. I shoot hard cast bevel base bullets mostly. I keep them under 1000fps. Glock barrels are very easy to clean compared to button rifled barrels which is why I have hesitated to change them. I load on a Dillon and the die will not resize the case all the way down. Can't really get rid of the bulge. I have always been a bit concerned about that but try not to use the brass too many times. The issue I have read about is the idea that cast bullets will strip past the lands and not be accurate. Which would also cause leading. But I really don't think I have had that problem. Glocks aren't target pistols anyway.
     
  12. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    I am glad that I do not own a Glock. HMB
     
  13. sernv99

    sernv99 Active Member

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    speaking of Glocks and 10mm.....can I drop a .40 barrel in my Glock 10mm and shoot .40 through it without any problems?
     
  14. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    EE, I have had no problem with excessive leading. I think you are wrong about the "grooves" being deeper. Quite the opposite, they are shallower than standard button rifling. That was my point about the possibility of the cast bullets stripping past the lands and causing leading.

    The unsupported chamber does weaken the brass and can't be fixed by resizing.
     
  15. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    SERNV99 just change the barrel and recoil spring.. and you're good to go in both 40 S&W or 357 Sig..
     
  16. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    EE, I don't know a thing about the XD 40. The lands are where the most friction is. Leading will occur when lead is rubbed from soft bullets, doesn't require flame. I have a Ruger Super Blackhawk that is the worst I have seen about leading. The barrel and chambers are rough as a cob. The polygonal rifling in a Glock does not have square lands like button rifling. The idea is that a cast bullet may not grip enough and blow past the lands and lead the barrel. Cast bullets are larger diameter than jacketed. If flame is not getting past jacketed bullets I don't think it would get past hard cast bullets.
     
  17. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    It isn't that I don't understand, I simply do not agree with what you state. I think leading will occur without blowby. Lands cause friction which causes heat. heat will cause leading. What you are talking about happens in magnums and requires a gas check to correct.. A failure of the base to seal. I certainly do not believe it is happening in my Glocks. They lead very little. Jacketed bullets also leave deposits in barrels. Is that friction or blowby.
     
  18. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    EE you're right about the flame cutting! Leading is NOT caused by friction.

    Jerry P: Please re read my original post. First you can, and many do, completely resize the .40S&W case. You can buy a Redding die made specifically to to this AS A SEPARATE OPERATION. I believe there is a youtube video of someone using this die. Or you can do like I do and use a Lee Taper Crimp die with the carbide sizing ring and remove the crimp sleeve and top cap and make a pusher to push the cases through the die. You push the case all the way thru the die, and it resizes the entire case. Then you process the cases thru your Dillon just like you normally would do. The only Glocks that bulge cases are the .40's and 10mm's. The .45's don't have enough pressure to do it and the 9mm's have relatively much stronger case bases. Redding only makes a .40 S&W push thru die, which should tell you it isn't a problem on the other calibers.

    I see no reason to change out the barrel in a Glock, the Glock factory shooters don't, and they are really good, not only that but Jesse Abbate looks good doin'it too.

    If you are running reduced loads the Glock's unsupported chamber is not an issue. It is when you try to hotrod the round and get into the 1100fps+ and above range, then case failure is only a matter of time the more you reload the same cases. It can be averted by good reloading practice and case inspection, and you've got to dump them before they fail. I am loading in the 950-1000fps range, which are considered to be "reduced" loads. I don't hotrod anything just because there is just no need to do it.

    Here's some pics of the sizing die and pusher. Like I said Redding makes a die like this for $35. The sized case shown measures .421 (not a good pic) just above the extractor groove. An Unfired factory round measures .420, They measure @.425ish after firing in my G35. Which has 6000+ rnds thru it. The chamber is on this gun is.429 dia, so the cases don't fully form to the chamber before they are kicked out.

    If you want to go the Lee tapercrimp die way then you have to make a pusher like I did. It is simple and if you have access to a Lathe I can provide a drawing of the part. All you do to the die is remove the top cap and the crimping sleeve, and it does not harm to the die whatsoever. Note: I first tried using the sizing die, but it sizes the case down to about .418 and the case WILL NOT go thru the die all the way no matter how hard you push. There is a video on youtube of someone doing the Lee die method also.

    Either way works well and increases your case life significantly.

    I also shoot these same loads thru my Para 1640LDA with no problems whatsoever.

    Randy


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  19. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    As far as your .44 goes if you are experiencing severe leading then there is definately something wrong with the load. Guys routinely load plain base bullets to 12-1400FPS and don't get leading. The correct hardness bullet, correct type of powder, and correctly sized and lubed bullets, are all part of the successful team. On your revolver your bullets made of wheel weights should be sized the same or +.001 over the throats of your chambers.(Rugers are usually around .430) Yours may vary depending when it was built. Another way is to use gas checks, which is what I do on all but my Squib loads. Gas checks completely remove leading with every shot. Also try some LBT bullet lube, it helps too. (Lead Bullet Technology, Veral Smith)

    On my Bisley I shoot 200gr hard cast bevel based bullets in .44S&W Special cases with Trail Boss powder. I get a small amount of lead deposit, but one swipe with a bore brush removes it all. Two reasons for this leading are hard bullets that don't upset during firing, and gas cutting around the bevel base. The reason the leading doesn't stick very well is because the Trail Boss powder doesn't burn that hot, and generates low pressures. These loads generate 750-800fps. If I loaded these same bullets with H110 at 1500fps they would lead the shit out of the barrel in short order.

    All of my heavy bullets 250gr-300gr use gas checks. I run them from 1000-18-1900FPS The 1000-1200fps loads are in the Bisley Revolver and the 18-1900fps loads are in my Marlin Rifle. Note: they are the same loads. The difference is between the 5" Bisley barrel and the 24" Marlin barrel. H110 powder,is the powder of choice, and I've probably burned 20-30 lbs in my shooting over the last 30 years. It works great in the .44 Spec and Mag. I use Trail Boss and Bullseye in the squib loads for plinking. They're fun to shoot.

    I don't hot rod the .44's as there is just no need to do it. A 250gr bullet at 11-1200FPS will go completely thru an elk, and it will certainly ruin anyones day getting hit by one of those slugs at any speed. I once shot a bum who was rifling thru my car square in the ass at 10ft with a 240gr .44 slug from my sling shot. It lit him up like you couldn't believe. I never saw anyone run that fast, and I bet he is still running!

    Getting hit by anything will ruin your day.

    The problems you are having are fixable. Like I said above, Handloader Magazine is good source for information on how to get around these common problems, and they are discussed frequently in that Mag by guys who actually know what they are talking about.

    My Ruger Bisley has had the barrel shortened to 5" a Weigand interchangeable front sight, a Bowen Rear sight, and glass beaded and reblued.

    The Marlin Rifle had the wood refinished and the action cleaned up(deburred)And yes, shooting 250 gr bullets at 18-1900FPS, it definately needs the recoil pad!

    Randy


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