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Getting kids started...

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by joe90t, Dec 13, 2011.

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  1. joe90t

    joe90t Active Member

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    JMO---28ga Is Great For Small Boys & Girls But, A 410 Is A Bad Idea In My Book. Too Small And Unless It Is A NICE Gun Hard To Handle. Gallon Plastic Milk Jugs Filled With Water To show Them The Power They Hold In Their Hands. The 28ga Has so Little recoil But Enough Shot To Make Them feel Good When they hit A Target. Joe W.
     
  2. Crickets

    Crickets Member

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    My Daughter is 9. She's a dead eye with her BB gun and a .22. I think I am going to wait one more year and get a 20ga Auto. She's a little small yet. I'm kind of in the mind set I'd rather start her at least a 20ga than go with a 410 which she'll soon out grow. So far she hasn't shown much interest in clays (YET), so I have some time. My thinking is when she's really interested I want to get the largest Ga. she can comfortably handle. So I'd rather wait than have her get frustrated starting too small too early. In the mean time I took the sights off her BB gun and hang a weighted card board target from a tree and she shoots its while its swinging back and forth.
     
  3. Bird30

    Bird30 TS Member

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    I started my oldest Girl with a remington 11-48 with a 28 inch full choke barrel in 20 ga. She was a little older than yours (10 years old). I took her to the trap field several times and when I thought she was ready I took her to her first reg. shoot. She won the womens trophy. I was very proud of her. I wish you good luck with your daughters. If the gun hurts them I would wait till they get a little older so they don't flinch.

    Dave

    P S 410 and 28 ga. shells are expensive.
     
  4. Oregunner

    Oregunner Well-Known Member

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    There is a subforum on Shotgunworld.com strictly for young shotgunners.
    http://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewforum.php?f=66 Lots of good information.
    Mark
     
  5. DB Bill

    DB Bill Active Member

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    I think it depends on a couple of things -- (1) their size and how strong they are. The process of loading, lifting, shooting, unloading, and then reloading a shotgun is more demanding that using a .22 rifle or BB-gun.
    (2) you'll be introducing them to recoil for the 1st time and that will add to the fatigue, (3) shotguns are bigger than most .22's so unless you're ready to bit the bullet and do a lot of trimming on the stock you might want to wait.

    And don't rush them to shoot a full round of 25 -- that's a lot for a new shooter. They will typically do fine for the first 5 or 6 shots, maybe even a few more --- but them it's down-hill and they will visibly struggle to finish.
     
  6. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    I would find a 20 ga, a beater stock that I can hack up, and work up a light 3/4 oz load with 9's or 8 1/2's. You almost have to reload to afford getting a light enough recoiling load. Shooting factory 28 ga is going to cost a bit.

    28 ga hulls are expensive and it will be difficult to find a beater stock for a 28 ga.

    Don Verna
     
  7. Oregunner

    Oregunner Well-Known Member

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    The Remington 1100 subgauge guns are all built on the 20 gauge receiver, so finding a youth rear stock for a 28 gauge shouldn't be that hard. It's finding a 28 gauge 1100 that will be the challenge. Mark
     
  8. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Just how big are these kids?! As was said the .410 wont do them any favors... but I would have to imagine the girls are still too small to hold a shotgun...

    My granddaughter is eight and big for her age... and she's still too small for a shotgun... stick with the .22 - its working and they're having fun, don't push it...

    Jay
     
  9. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Their your kids so you know better about their physical and mental capabilities but I would have to think they are way too young for handling a shotgun. This isn't something you want to rush, typically kids aren't ready for this until they are 9 or 10 years old - sometimes older.

    You could start working on their shooting skills that they will need for clay target shooting by practicing shooting hand thrown tin cans with a BB gun that has no sights. This is great fun for the dad too.
     
  10. roger8918

    roger8918 Member

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    I totally agree with wolfram. I know some of you on here will disagree but 11-12 is the youngest I will take into my program. The biggest issue I run it to with the younger kids, and I never see it talked about here, is flinching. Flinching is a difficult problem to overcome when kids are started to young.
     
  11. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    I think we all agree to disagree...

    one issue I've dealt with... my Benelli Nova youth model has a tremendous pull weight... even my 11 Y.O grandson has some issues sometimes pulling the trigger with consistency...

    Jay
     
  12. Bird30

    Bird30 TS Member

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    I have a great grand daughter that wanted to shoot moving targets. I bought a savage 22 cal smooth bore single shot that shoots bird shot shells and bought mono clay targets for her to shoot. You might be surprised how well these young people can shoot. The gun weighs what a 22 light rifle weighs. Just a idea for your daughters to shoot moving targets.

    Dave
     
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