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garden tiller recommends?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Bisi, Mar 9, 2012.

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  1. Bisi

    Bisi TS Member

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    Looks like my old 70s era Craftsman front tine garden tiller has given up the ghost. Looking for recomendations on a new one, any suggestions?

    Is a rear tine tiller that much better? Leaning toward a front tine only because it will take up less space in the garage. I've got a nice cubbie hole where the present tiller fits in just right.

    Thanks for the info in advance.

    Bisi
     
  2. RWT

    RWT Well-Known Member

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    I have had both.

    Front tine is easier to get into tight spaces but is a little harder on you.

    Rear tine is easier to handle in tough dirt but is clumsy.

    The front tine was like yours a 70s model craftsman. The rear tine a 2005 model craftsman. There is no quality in the 2005 model compared to the 70s model. I would look at something besides Craftsman.

    If I ever buy another it will be front tine.

    Robert
     
  3. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    I've had both and I will say that my rear tine has never socked me in the knee with the handgrip like the old front tine did. The rear tine takes up quite a bit of room, but it is time for "Spring Cleaning". ;-)

    Mine is a 6.5 HP MTD that I got when WallyWorld was closing them out. I've had to replace the belt on it once, but otherwise no maintenance except for an air filter in 3 years. Like most of them it really struggles on turf, but can make short work of a garden. Because of it's design it doesn't have a lot of ground clearance, but when it gets hung up the reverse solves the problem. Good luck.
     
  4. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    I borrowed my buddy's Troy bilt rear tine one time and it did a really good job for a small tiller. They are expensive so that why I have a 1985 front
    Tine from a
    Oval box store. It has served me well with only belt replacements. It is more work to use and leaves a double wheel track, but does the job OK.. I garden way more since I am retired so I guess if I had bought a Troy bilt 27 years ago I would still be enjoying it today, but I had no extra money then
     
  5. DJM

    DJM Member

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    Central Minnesota
    I am a DIY person but not on this one. Never made sense to me to buy a tiller. I paid a guy $30 to till my garden. For the price of a tiller I get 15 years of hiring it out. No labor to till the garden, no tiller in the way the 363 days I do not use it, never have to winterize it, no one asking to borrow my tiller, no oil changes, no repairs because the carb is gummed up etc. etc.
     
  6. sterlingworth

    sterlingworth Active Member

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    If you have loose sandy soil a rear-tine tiller is fine.If you have hard,compacted,clay soil a front tine is the only way to go.I to have an old craftsmen front tiller,replaced a few motors but still working fine.Got a troy built a few years ago could not use it.I had hard soil and the unit would jump around like a bucking bronco,could not cut through the soil. Ray p.s Troy-built makes a counter rotating unit,that mignt work for hard soil.
     
  7. RWT

    RWT Well-Known Member

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    I have tried the Troy bilt also, but it did not have counter rotating tines, it was very hard to use.

    My craftsman that I have now has counter rotating tines and does really smooth when you are in hard compacted soil or even turf you can run it with one hand and just walk along side. But it is not built like they used to build them. The only problem with it is on the return path it is vey hard to keep it from wanting to go back into the already tilled soil.

    If you get a rear tine be sure to get it with the counter rotating tines.

    I think DJM might be onto something if you only use it once a year, but I use mine a lot more than that.

    Robert
     
  8. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    Bisi where you located?

    I'd make you a hell of a deal on a Weed Eater (MDT)rear tine that has about 10 hours on it

    Bought a 3 pt John Deere tiller to mount on the 2210, and the "old" tiller hasn't been used since
     
  9. TNCoach

    TNCoach Member

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    I wouldn't buy anything new I bought a Troybuilt 20 years ago and would probably look for an older "rugged" model a Pony or bigger.

    They don't bring what they should...it's well worth the time rebuilding it back to new. I loved the one on my Allis-Chalmers, but it didn't prepare the soil the way the Troybuilt did.

    I didn't mention that there is a learning curve getting the engine and tine speed just right especially if you're digging up sod etc.

    My 2 Cents,
    TNCoach
     
  10. oldgahchamp

    oldgahchamp Active Member

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    TNCoach is right. Find an old Troy-Built in good condition that was actually built by Troy Built. I think they are now made by MTD. They were very rugged machines back in the day. Larry Evans
     
  11. ou.3200

    ou.3200 Well-Known Member

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    Another vote for the used Troybilt or as an alternative Ariens Rocket provided it has a good set of tines on it. Tines for the Ariens are hard to find. Tilling in hard soil or sod with the Troybilt requires using the depth bar to limit the depth for each pass. If you try to go too deep on one pass it will buck and jump around as some have described.
     
  12. steele

    steele TS Member

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    WARNING FYI In the early 80s, my friend asked to borrow my Troy-bilt Horse. Excellant machine. He had it for most of the summer & I didn't need it, so I sorta forgot about it. Next thing I know, I get summoned to civil court. I'm getting sued by his neighbor, who borrowed my Troy-bilt from my friend. The neighbor had the misfortune of backing the tines over his foot as he was in reverse. I guess it chewed on him pretty good. He was trying to sue me for injuries sustained by my machine. Luckily it got thrown out because I did not give it to him directly. The judge advised if I had lent to him, it would have been my responsibility to train him on using it, & my neighbor wasn't at fault, as it wasn't his machine. Moral of story, if you have a roto-tiller, someone always wants to borrow it. If they break it & or get hurt with it, your screwed!!

    Butch fom Pgh
     
  13. porky

    porky TS Member

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    Another vote for the Troybilt tiller. I garden in heavy clay soils so you can't work the soil until it starts to dry out. Tilling up gardens where there is sod requires for the operator to break through the sod in the first 2 passes. After that you can dig up the soil pretty good, but if you try to take too much of the sod in the first or second pass, you'll be running behind the tiller trying to keep up since the tines won't break through the sod in a single pass and will actually walk across the lawn, pulling the tires off of the ground.. Any new gardens requiring sod to be broken up should be turned over by a tractor with a plow and then have them disc it. But a Troybilt will do it, it's just hard on a machine.
     
  14. johnboy

    johnboy Member

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    Have been using a Troy-bilt horse from the 1980's for 30 plus years. Replaced the tines once. What a hunk of American make machinery.
     
  15. bucrub

    bucrub TS Member

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    Merry Tiller. I don't know if they are still made or not. I have had this one for so many years that it qualifys for S.S. and had to replace the motor once. I'm sure it is over 35 yrs.
     
  16. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Another vote for the Troy Bilt. We have one on the farm we use for our large veggie garden. Its an older rear tine with a Kohler engine. It will drag my fat butt across the garden and literally eat up any soil it can find.
     
  17. ramen39

    ramen39 Member

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    I have had an Ariens for many years now. It has A Kohler engine. It is an excellent machine but I hear they don't make them anymore. Hopefully, if it ever breaks I will be able to get parts for it.
     
  18. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    If you don't need a big one, I bought a electric Green Machine for my wife. It's a neat little unit, with a 5 year warranty. Works great for her flower beds and small garden. Amazon for about $125.00.
     
  19. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    Whatever you buy, be sure it DOES NOT have a Chinese engine!! THEY ARE JUNK! You would be surprised how few American small engines are available these days and how many Sales persons are either misinformed or will deliberately mislead you when asked where the engine is built!!
     
  20. ctreay

    ctreay Member

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    My TroyBuilt Horse is over 20 years old and still going strong.

    ctreay
     
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