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Game Fishing Boat Recommendations

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Kim Little, Mar 15, 2009.

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  1. Kim Little

    Kim Little Member

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    Help, wife is distress! My husband is looking into buying a "game" fishing boat for the Chincoteague Bay/Chesapeake Bay. What is your experience and recommendations. Kim
     
  2. jm1079

    jm1079 Well-Known Member

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    My brother who lives in Richmond, Virginia had a 22 foot Boston Whaler Outrage that we used to fish on the Chesapeake Bay. To me, it was the perfect boat for the area. What was interesting was after 3 years of use, he sold it and even made a profit. FWIW. jm
     
  3. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Be aware that a boat is a hole in the water in which you pour money. (LOL)

    Boston Whaler's are great boats but they are not cheap. If you have the funds, you can't go wrong with Boston Whaler and Mercury outboards.

    Years ago, the cost of fuel was an afterthought given the price of the rig. Today, with the possibility of the return of $4 plus fuel, economy is a consideration.

    A 17' Boston Whaler center console with a 60 HP mercury will cover a lot of water with good economy.

    A 22' outrage is a great boat.

    Ed Ward
     
  4. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    I suggest the ever lovely: "OPB's"...much more practical.

    OPB = Other People's Boats

    Curt
     
  5. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    I've been through this and have helped several friends save their marriages. The problem with a boat is that everyone wants one for a different reason, and these tend to be at odds with one another.

    Dad wants a fishing boat, mom wants one that is comfortable (one with a toilet?), son wants a fast, fancy ski boat, and daughter wants a stylish 'sunning' boat.

    Just so you know, this boat does not exist - hence any boat will be a compromise.

    If you are looking for a dedicated fishing boat for the Bay and light ocean use you are looking for a center console, 'deep-V' (perhaps a 'modified-V') - the classic of this is a Mako. Roballo followed suit. The Whalers are OK, but their hull designs, while stable, tend to give a rough, wet ride (note to husbands - wives do NOT like these attributes).

    Will this live in the water, or be trailered behind the car? If trailered - size matters - you need a boat that two people can load and un-load (better if one can do it). 'One person' max is about 18 feet, 'two people' is in the low to mid twenties. Don't go smaller than 16 feet.

    The engine matters too - My personal opinion is stick with an outboard (stay away from inboards or I/O's - see note on 'draft' below). There will be massive arguments as to which engine to buy - Mercury - vs - Johnson/Evinrude - Suzuki or Yamaha. I'll pass on this one.

    Draft of the boat matters as well - especially in back bays and near the shore line - you want the 'deep V' for stability when running, but you want one that can run into shallow water of the bays or onto a sandbar to explore, etc.(hence my earlier comment about the 'modified V').

    I really helped make things clear - didn't I??

    Good luck,

    David D
     
  6. Kim Little

    Kim Little Member

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    This is exactly the kind of debate that I need. Please keep the experience and the opinions coming.
     
  7. don q

    don q TS Member

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    I have a 20' North River with a 150hp Yamaha and a 8hp kicker for trolling that suits any need you want. They are a little spendy though, but worth it. I got mine 2 years old for 28,000. don q
     
  8. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    ENGINES

    OK, so I'll wade into this one a bit...

    In boards have a large engine (think big car engine) somewhere inside the boat. A solid shaft caries power back through the bottom of the hull to a propeller. Think the same design as a big tanker, just on a much smaller scale.

    Because this cannot be raised or lowered you cannot go into shallow waters - let alone run up onto a beach.

    An in board/out board (I/O) has the same internal engine, but has a power train mounted to the back of the boat not unlike a true out board. These tend to have lots of moving parts, and owing to how they are built they can only be raised a small amount (better than the in board - not equal to the out board) and they still draw lots of water.

    Out boards mount high up on the transom of the boat and are designed to be raised and lowered easily (hydraulic pumps) - this allows easy access to shallow waters (perhaps six inches or less - you would be polling the boat - not under power).

    In general the in board and I/O engines are four cycle (gas or diesel) and out boards are two cycle (these run on gas/oil mixture). There are some new outboards that run on straight gas and are four cycle (Honda, new Evinrude).

    Four strokes will give better fuel useage, two strokes will give better power & speed for size (at the cost of using more fuel). As is said earlier the new four stroke outboards seem to have the best of both worlds (my brother has a Honda on a 17 foot Mako - great Bay and light ocean boat - good fuel mileage too).

    The outboards tend to be easier to load and unload from trailers (just raise the engine out of the way) and will fit better on smaller boats (you seldom see an I/O less than 20 feet, and true in boards go only up from there).

    Unless you want to only run in 'deep' water (three feet minimum) stick with an outboard. Mud flats, sand bars, beach visits all require an outboard to visit.

    If you are talking eastern shore areas almost all the in-shore boats there are outboards - there is a reason for this... Lots of submerged bars just waiting to grab your boat. Outboards will gently bounce over this (the raisable design means the engine can kick up if it hits an object). I/O's can do this to a certain extent, but you can really hurt the lower unit if you hit hard. In boards mean you've bought yourself a trip to the yard to have the boat pulled and the problem fixed (hopefully).

    David D
     
  9. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Dave makes some good points. So now let me confuse you!

    This is like the (What's a good trap gun?) question.

    New or used. New is less headaches than used. Especially if you don't know boats. New costs many times more than used. The best boat values are used if you know what your looking for.

    budget $5000, $25,000, $75,000, $200,000, Over $750,000

    The reason I chose the price points I did is in order to see any significant difference is features you will have to make big jumps.

    Where is the money in boats Length or size of hull, Power (type and size of engines), and electronics.

    Where can you save Electronics. You don't need $10,000 to $15,000 weather radar for day trips! You don't need a $3000 fish finder if you cant afford to put gas in the boat.

    Engines well one is always cheaper than two. Two are more reliable but if your no further than 30 miles from a port you don't need two. A good radio and sea tow will get you home if the motor breaks.

    Gas or Diesel It depends on how far your running and how fast. DO NOT BUY ANY I/O BOATS UNLESS USED AND FACTOR IN THE COST OF REPOWERING WHEN THEY BREAK!

    The actual use will make the choices more evident.

    Joe
     
  10. roger8918

    roger8918 Member

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    Whaler, Outrage 18 (1981-1990). Beautiful teak, extremely stable, impressive offshore capability, yet it is small enough and light enough to be easily trailered. The boat's shallow draft makes it useful inshore, too, adding to its versatility. The Outrage 18 is a boat that could do almost anything! Outstanding Chesapeake bay boat.

    I have an 86 Montauk and keep in Ocean City. I would love to have an Outrage but I like the smaller boat for my back bay fishing holes.


    HSLDS, Whalers have wet rides? The "smirk's" are by far the driest ride in their class. Rough maybe but not wet.
     
  11. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    Roger8918 - any 'flat' hull (cathedral, 'W,' etc.) will tend to slap the water rather than cut it like a true 'V' hull will. Net result is a rougher ride and a wetter ride.

    Put a 20 foot mako next to a 20 foot Whaler and see who gets wet...

    David D
     
  12. DBLMTHM

    DBLMTHM Member

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    I ran a 22 1/2 foot Mako/Nitro with a 150 Mercury on the Mississippi/Louisiana Gulf Coast bays and marshes for 4 years. Couldn't have been happier with the outfit. Cost was reasonable back in 2002. Under $23,000.
     
  13. Kim Little

    Kim Little Member

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    My husband and I are finding your suggestions very helpful, thank you, please keep up the debate. No we are not planning on trailering. Our slip is in a shallow area only 3 feet deep leading to the bay in the Ocean City area. We have NO boat experience that is why all opinions are welcome. Our only boat experience has been as guests. Thanks, Kim
     
  14. letts

    letts TS Member

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    Sportcraft Resonably priced and built very strong. I have 1 31' offshore and have been very happy with it. If I were you I would buy outboards with power tilt you you should be able to go in shall water


    Letts
     
  15. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    If your looking used stay away from any older Bayliners (junk)!
     
  16. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Find a marina in the area which has a fishing guide working out of it and ask them.
     
  17. headhunter

    headhunter Well-Known Member

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    Jones Brothers Cape fisherman! Check it out. Perfect Bay boat.
     
  18. JEB

    JEB Active Member

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    Love Mako's, I had one for 15 years on Long Isalnd Sound, but if you are going offshore, can't beat a Grady White. I have one for sale on Long Island -- 1992 Sailfish 25 1/2' (now rated 27 1/2") in great condition with (2) 200 HP 2001 salt water EFI Mercs, Lee outriggers, full electrics (radar, Northstar GPS, depth finder, stereo, and VHF), and windlass. Price $32,00.

    My wife and I spend too much time trapshooting.

    John Bergman
     
  19. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    Here's what I had. Kept it at the Indian River Inlet....great Delaware Bay and Ocean boat....

    A tad pricey, but one of the best boats made!

    Curt
     
  20. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    Oops! Put the website in the wrong place!!

    Curt
     
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