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French Military Weapons

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Jim Veta, May 26, 2011.

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  1. Jim Veta

    Jim Veta Active Member

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    For all of you weapon collectors that use The Blue Book of Gun Values. Under the category "French Militay Weapons" you will note an odd phenomena.
    All the weapons listed are at 98% collectors quality. Nothing at 100% and nothing less then 98%. The one time the weapon was carried, it was immediately dropped causing only a minor blemish, allowing it to always be in near perfect condition. Sorry LaFayette, I am not including you in the mix.
    Just kidding everyone. The French did aid us against the Brits.
     
  2. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    No dings on them from being dropped??
     
  3. BIG JIM IN BAKERSFIELD

    BIG JIM IN BAKERSFIELD TS Member

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    Same with the Italian rifle's. Carried and dropped only one time ... BIG JIM and yes, I am Italian.
     
  4. TOOLMAKER 251

    TOOLMAKER 251 Active Member

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    At least 1 Italian rifle was dropped twice, once in Italy and once in Texas.
     
  5. SF SGM

    SF SGM Member

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    Forgot the most important thing, never fired!

    Van
     
  6. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    LMFAO!!!
     
  7. Bushmaster1313

    Bushmaster1313 Well-Known Member

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    Don't be so hard on them. Even though they are outnumbered 100 to 1, after we gave them a little bit of help they have fearlessly kicked the butts of our common enemies big time and they have been one of our staunchest allies.

    Oops, you were talking about the French. My mistake, I thought that like the Administration you too were ragging on the Israelis.
     
  8. 3dram8

    3dram8 Member

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    Didn't the rifle stocks also have little swing-out mirrors on them as well so that the French could see if the enemy was gaining on them and whether they had to run even faster while retreating? ....Rick
     
  9. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    Yes, swing out mirrors and a telescoping white flag were standard issue...that's if it's really authentic.
     
  10. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Active Member

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    The tanks had 5 reverse gears and one forward, in case they were attacked from the back !!!! Jeff
     
  11. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Jeff--I like that one. 5 reverse 1 forward. LOL
     
  12. bill1949

    bill1949 Well-Known Member

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    I know you've heard the one about why the Champs d'Elysee (spelling?) is lined on both sides with trees? It so the German troops can march in the shade...Bill
     
  13. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    The French are now our friends and took the lead in the fight in Libya.

    The French 75 mm field gun was a wonder weapon in WW I and is the forerunner of the modern field gun.

    The French 75 is widely regarded as the first modern artillery piece. It was the first field gun to include a hydro-pneumatic recoil mechanism, which kept the gun's trail and wheels perfectly still during the firing sequence. Since it did not need to be re-aimed after each shot, the French 75 could deliver fifteen rounds per minute on its target, either shrapnel or high-explosive, up to about 5 miles (8,500 meters) away. Its firing rate could reach 30 rounds per minute only for a short period of time and with a highly experienced crew. These were rates that contemporary bolt action rifles could not match.

    Another way of looking at the advantage of a French 75 is that one French 75 had the firepower of a battery of 15 or so other field guns. The round itself was very high velocity and had a very flat trajectory. It could be aimed about 4 feet off of the ground and travel for a thousand yards or so at this height before impact.

    At the opening of World War I, in 1914, the French Army had about 4,000 of these field guns in service. By the end of the war about 12,000 had been produced . It was also in service with the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF), which had been supplied with about 2,000 French 75 field guns. Several thousand were still in use in the French Army at the opening of World War II, updated with new wheels and tires to allow towing by trucks rather than by horses.

    The French 75 gave its best performances during the Battle of the Marne in August–September 1914 and at Verdun in 1916. The contribution of 75mm artillery in these two battles, and thus to the French victories that ensued, was perceived at the time as quantitatively important. In the case of Verdun, over 1,000 French 75's (250 batteries) were constantly in action, night and day, on the battlefield during a period of nearly nine months. The total consumption of 75mm shells at Verdun during the period February 21 to September 30, 1916, is documented by the public record at Service Historique de l'Armee de Terre to have been in excess of 16 million rounds, or nearly 70% of all shells fired by French artillery during that battle.

    The French 75 was a devastating anti-personnel weapon against waves of infantry attacking in the open, as at the Marne and Verdun. However its shells were comparatively light and lacked the power to obliterate trench works, concrete bunkers and deeply buried shelters. Thus, eventually, the French 75 batteries became routinely used to cut corridors, with high-explosive shells, across the belts of German barbed wire. Finally, after 1916, the 75 batteries became the carriers of choice to deliver toxic gas shells, including mustard gas and phosgene. (From the Wikipedia)



    Claude Etienne Minié was the inventor of the Minié rifle. It came to prominence in the Crimean War and the American Civil War. The Minié ball (or minie ball) is named after him. The Minié ball is a type of muzzle-loading spin-stabilizing rifle bullet. (From the Wikipedia)

    Ed Ward
     
  14. kiv-c

    kiv-c Member

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    Hey, don't be too hard on the French. Just remember, if they hadn't taken our side in the Revolutionary war we'd all be speaking English today!
     
  15. Steve W

    Steve W Well-Known Member

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    I'm not against France, they were our allies for hundreds of years, and they always will be. One thing I really admire the French is they managed to pass the law to banned the hijab in public schools.

    However, while we are on the topic, here's another French military joke:

    Do you know why French Navy have glass bottom boats?

    "So they can see the old French Navy."
     
  16. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Smokeless powder is a French invention.

    French chemist Henri Braconnot discovered in 1832 that nitric acid, when combined with starch or wood fibers, would produce a lightweight combustible explosive material, which he named xyloïdine. A few years later in 1838 another French chemist Théophile-Jules Pelouze (teacher of Ascanio Sobrero and Alfred Nobel) treated paper and cardboard in the same way. He obtained a similar material he called nitramidine. Both of these substances were highly unstable, and were not practical explosives.

    The first practical smokeless powder made from nitrocellulose, for firearms and artillery ammunition, was invented by French chemist Paul Vieille in 1884.

    The 8×50mmR French (8 mm Lebel) rifle cartridge was the first smokeless gunpowder cartridge to be made and adopted by any country. It was introduced by France in 1886. Formed by necking down the 11 mm Gras black powder cartridge, the smokeless 8 mm Lebel cartridge started a revolution in military rifle ammunition. Standard 8mm Lebel ammunition was also the first to feature a boat-tail bullet (Balle D) which was adopted in 1898.

    (From the Wikipedia)

    Ed Ward
     
  17. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    School Teacher---Not to take away from your interesting info, but the Chinese actually have referennces in old alchemical text dated 492 AD. It contains notes of burn rates of various saltpetre combinations way back then. Darn Chinese have had their hands in just about everything in history. To throw salt(pun intended) in the wound, the Arabs acquired knowledge of gunpowder some time after 1240 AD, but before 1280 AD. Arabic writings contain recipes for gunpowder, instructions for the purification of saltpeter, and descriptions of gunpowder incendiaries. Gunpowder arrived in the Middle East, possibly through India, but originating in China. ----Matt
     
  18. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Matt:

    Thanks for your nice post but the French invented smokeless powder while the Chinese invented black powder.

    This topic interested me as the French, going back to Napoleon, developed some of the best artillery pieces in the world.

    Prior to the age of firearms, the French made some of the best chain mail, armour and swords. Clovis, Charles Martel and Charles the Great (Charlemagne) were fierce French warriors and later kings.

    The rift with France began with Charles De Gaulle. De Gaulle was resentful that the Allies favored General Jacques-Philippe Leclerc over him and let General Leclerc lead the Free French army’s liberation parade into Paris.

    De Gaulle oversaw the development of French atomic weapons and promoted a foreign policy independent of U.S. and British influence. He withdrew France from NATO military command—although remaining a member of the western alliance—and twice vetoed Britain's entry into the European Community. He traveled widely in Eastern Europe and other parts of the world and recognized Communist China. On a visit to Canada he gave encouragement to Quebec Separatism. (From the Wikipedia)

    I worked with French officers during the late 1960’s. In social settings, they claimed to be from South Africa as they were embarrassed by France’s withdrawal from NATO.

    France’s nuclear powered aircraft carrier, the Charles De Gaulle, is in active service in the Mediterranean as we speak participating in the air campaign against Colonel Muammar al-Gaddafi’s forces.


    Ed Ward
     
  19. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    school teacher---My bad. Your correct on that aspect of it. I wasn't trying to one up you though. Just some additional info. Amazing that way back then either was invented. We had to get black powder first to get the idea to make it smokeless though. Never thought i'd say it, but thank God for the Chinese and the French or i wouldn't be head'n out to shoot Trap now. Have a good weekend.--Matt
     
  20. Goliad

    Goliad TS Member

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    No, the rift with France came when they rolled over on their backs and pee'ed all over themselves when the Germans rolled in, in WW2.

    The French resistance WAS great, just not enough of them.

    Appreciate their inventions, help during the Revolutionary War etc. But the fact remains, the only war they ever won was the French revolution when they defeated ....... themselves........
     
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