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For all you that work with wood....

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by bigdogtx, Jun 4, 2010.

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  1. bigdogtx

    bigdogtx Well-Known Member

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    <object width="640" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/E3mzhvMgrLE&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/E3mzhvMgrLE&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385"></embed></object>
     
  2. handlepuller

    handlepuller Well-Known Member

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    Interesting to find this on here tonight. I just got out of surgery an hour ago where I was fixing a table saw injury. By far the most common injury I see on call.

    If you do woodworking it seems it's just a matter of time before you have an injury. This sucker is probably expensive but it's also probably worth it.
     
  3. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    I would say the the entire saw motor is trash but thats better than the missing body parts Havent seen it on the market yet but would be good in the class work shop.
    On wood working: most injury occurs for running blade too high and not useing a push stick
    I have seen many run a short piece and try to push it all the way through. run it half way and turn it around and run it the other half you have both in control and hands dont get near the blade
     
  4. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    For a number of years I took woodworking classes at a Junior college. I saw two people loose fingers and many other minor injuries. One has to be careful when working with power equipment. I could almost tell who was going to screw-up the first day of each class. Air-heads were easy to spot.
     
  5. schockstrap

    schockstrap Active Member

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    The SawStop has been on the market since 2005 or 2006, and is a pretty hot commodity in the woodworking community right now. The first version to be released ran about $5000 (a very high quality industrial cabinet saw), but they have since come out with a contractor's saw and a "professional" cabinet saw that run between $1500-3000. The prices may sound high, but considering that a new Delta unisaw (the age-old standard in cabinet saws) costs close to $3000 without this technology, it's almost a no-brainer. If you actuate the blade brake, you will end up replacing the blade (about $100 for a good quality 10" blade) and the braking cartridge ($70). The rest of the saw (motor, trunion, arbor, etc.) is not typically damaged.

    The SawStop doesn't protect from kick-back, though, so it's not like it's a worry-free tablesaw. You still have to pay attention.

    --Dan
     
  6. trap867

    trap867 TS Member

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    A couple years ago the boss was thinking about this saw but didnt want to pay 3000.00 for a table saw. Then a coworker cut his thumb right up the center to the knuckle. Then of course after the accident the new saw showed up 2 weeks later and it rocks.High performance, huge stop button, overide option, great piece of machinery.Every shop should have one.
    trap867
     
  7. Claydotter

    Claydotter Active Member

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    Great Post!

    Very,very impressive. I`ve been out of woodwork since 2000, so have not heard about this.

    I too, have seen some nasty table saw injuries. Very dangerous piece of equipment.Most people that are injured have not had enough training from an experienced operator, are just plain stupid , or ignore safety rules.

    Regards, Pete
     
  8. VietVet

    VietVet TS Member

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    Our company bought two of these--very well built, and quite accurate as well. Every bit as good as a Powermatic aor Jet. The Sawstop works like a charm. Cheap insurance against bodily injury in the workplace. Not having one of these in your shop is asking for trouble. no doubt.

    I have no connection with the Sawstop company or any of its advertisers--I just see this as the answer to a question that has been asked years ago.

    John
     
  9. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    I teach Ind. Arts at a high school and we bought the Stop Saw to make things even safer for student use. I would warn that this product ant the company that produces itare involved in several law suites. There have been some accidents with the use of the saw. On another note if infact the fail safe is engaged the cost of returning the saw to operating condition is about $300.00. If memory serves we paid about $750.00 more than a traditional table saw of the same size.
     
  10. ric3677

    ric3677 Well-Known Member

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    Montana
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