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Fly fishing reels?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by g7777777, Jan 1, 2008.

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  1. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Are the newer reels with the hefty price tags really any better than an older used model available at a fraction of the cost?
     
  2. FLAKETM

    FLAKETM TS Member

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    A cheap reel is all you need for trout fishing in the lower 48 because any pro who is not a salesman or product rep will tell you that it is only used to hold the line. You play the fish with your hand. I'm sure you know this anyway. An expensive reel would be neat for salmon, etc where you actually play the fish with the reel. But, you know most of us - fly fishing is like trap shooting. You want a P-gun, etc. even when you're smashing them with your Browning 99.
     
  3. SR1

    SR1 TS Member

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    Yes they are if you are going after large fish.
     
  4. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    Abel reels look way cool!!!
     
  5. rw993

    rw993 Active Member

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    When you get into the 10lb Rainbow class or larger ala steelhead, searun trout, or large salmonoids, you would do well to have a larger diameter reel that the spool is locked by a threaded mechanism and the drag is a cork or composite material. Nothing like fighting a big fish and having the spool explode off the reel frame, because it is held on by a flimsy "clip" in a groove on the end of the axle. $300-400 is to be expected (you can spend more!).
    Ron Wilson
     
  6. rw993

    rw993 Active Member

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    Tried to post pic....... Maybe this works

    RW

    http://s252.photobucket.com/albums/hh33/rw993/?action=view&current=Ronsfish.jpg
     
  7. Questor

    Questor TS Member

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    You don't need to spend much more than about $50 for a good and durable trout reel. I like trout fishing a lot and have two of the really nice ones, an Orvis CFO and a Ross Evolution. I'll be the first to admit that they are not necessary and don't work any better than my old Scientific Anglers reels, but they are much nicer cosmetically and that's why I have them.

    I'll take this opportunity to opine on fly rods too. 20 years ago when I started fly fishing it made some sense to buy the more expensive rods becaus they were truly functionally better (with a few really great exceptions like the old Cortlands). But today there is such a competitiv market for fly gear that you can easily put together an excellent outfit including line for about $150.

    My best recommendation is to go to a fly shop and ask them to put together a good beginners kit for you for around $150. They should be able to do it. This will save you much experimentation and the attendant costs of doing so.

    The one thing not to pinch pennies on is fly line. Don't get the super expensive kind, but something like Scientific Anglers Mastery lines should be your minimum quality. And get a good fly dressing and cleaning pad too.

    For reels, I prefer the black finishes because the brushed aluminum ones have finish that becomes compromised and the underlying metal begins to corrode, which makes for an ugly reel in the long run.
     
  8. widomaker

    widomaker TS Member

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    The Trout fisherman are correct most of the time you are really not fighting small trout on the reel. The only time you would need another reel would be for salt water ie Tarpon or Bone fish. This would accomplish two things salt water durability and a reliable smooth drag system to slow the fish down. The other reason would be for large king salmon and steelhead . I have landed a 40lb. Salmon in the Salmon River Pulaski NY. With the Scientific Angler 9 - 10 reel with a 12lb. shock tippet tied on. Its mostly in the rod not the reel in fly fishing.

    Martin Milano
     
  9. Hipshot 3

    Hipshot 3 TS Member

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    Abel reels! Continue to be the best........with,of course, the Abel Arm, that puts the reel below the hand.
     
  10. Gold E

    Gold E TS Member

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    A website you flyfishermen may find interesting.

    Rick is a fine gentleman and craftsman.
     
  11. BrooklynPrep69

    BrooklynPrep69 TS Member

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    IMHO, Billy Pate reels offer great price/performance/durability especially in Saltwater...............Steve
     
  12. byteme

    byteme TS Member

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    I'm very interested in stating fly fishing but don't want to sink a bunch of money into it until I'm sure I like it. I've been looking at the package out fits, rod, reel, line, backinng, etc, offered by Bass Pro Shop and Cabela's. I'd appreciate any thoughts and/or comments on these rigs. Thanks Bill
     
  13. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    GN7777777:

    FlakeTM gave you great advice. Unless you are going for really big fish, all the reel does is hold the line and balance the rod.

    I have been fly fishing for Bass and Bluegill for over 30 years so I can not speak as to Trout or other types of fishing. A few comments are as follows:

    1. I would stay with a rod under 8 feet as they are easier to use. A rod with a stiff butt and limp top is easier to use than the older “double action” rods that have a weak butt and a weak tip.

    2. I like a large wide cork grip at the top of the handle as I get better control of the rod. I don't like a tapered grip.

    3. Spend the money and get a weight forward floating line. Use line cleaner frequently.

    4. I have never taken a bass larger than 4 # of a fly rod. However, that bass was not too hard to play as a long rod gives you considerable leverage. Be patient and let the rod wear down the fish.

    5. Keep your hooks really sharp.

    6. I have an older Shakespeare USA made automatic reel and some more modern single action reels. The automatic reel is my favorite as it is heavier than a single action reel and balances well on my 7' 9" Shakespeare Fly Wonderod. I think that Martin still makes automatic reels.

    7. Learn to set the hook by pulling the line with your hand or at least with the rod and hand at the same time. Pull the fly with your hand, not the rod

    8. Tapered leaders are better with small wet and dry flies but thin 4# monofilament is fine with a popper or bass bug.

    9. Fish with what works. On slow summer days, I have knocked down dragon flies with a badminton racket and cast them out by stretching out a line behind me and propping up the dead dragon fly on a clover bud before the cast. This is deadly in a small pond. A little strip of white pork rind on a # 10 gold hook is deadly on nesting bass and sunfish. Just let it sink to the bottom of the nest and wait for the fish to pick it up to move out of the nest. Good old red worms (you laugh) catch a lot of fish.

    10. If you have the bucks, the new single action fly reels are works of art. They cost like it too because, IMO, the big stores have big markups on fly fishing goods.

    11. If you are new to the sport, you have to practice casting. Watch an experienced fly rod user. You have to get the "feel" of gradually lengthening the line as you cast and learning to pause to let the line straighten out behind you before your next cast.

    12. Always watch behind yourself and be careful around other fly fishermen. My brother has hooked me in the arm and ear and I got him once in the cheek.

    Good luck and keep it simple.
     
  14. widomaker

    widomaker TS Member

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    I deleted my last post accidently so sorry. I've been fly fishing for quite some time now started in Newfoundland Canada in Argentia. You best money will be spent in the flyrod itself its the work horse of the outfit. I was fortunate to live in a place where fly fishing was not uncommon. Very close to Sullivan County NY. The Beaverkill and other famed streams close by. Any fly fisherman will tell you that to make a great forward cast you have to make a great back cast. This involves correctly loading the rod to accelerate the line through the guides on the forward cast. Unless your going after big fish you will hardly ever fight off the reel. Salt water reels and Salmon reels are for a smooth drag to slow the fish down. Salt water gear for corrosion of the reel parts and line guides. I have a 5wt. Ron Kussie rod maker, A 5-6wt. Made by Ted Simroe and also a 9-10 Salmon rod made by Ted Simroe. All have backbone and all can cast .

    Martin Milano
     
  15. ffwildcat

    ffwildcat TS Member

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    Byteme,

    be careful - flyfishing is not an inexpensive sport to setup. rod, reel, line, waders, boots, vest, flies and the myriad accessories that go with - you can drop some serious coin.

    find a flyshop near you that offers a guide service and have them take you out for a day or two and have them provide all the gear (or rent it if possible) before jumping in.

    you can always buy used and ebay has a bunch of stuff for sale but a newbie won't know what to look for. and just like shooting, until you have done it for a bit and understand how to cast you really won't know what type of rod to get - they're all different.

    most serious fly fishermen i know have multiple rods and reel. i have 17 rods and a bag of reels.

    not a cheap hobby.
     
  16. bytme

    bytme TS Member

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    ffwild, thanks for the suggestion on trying a guided trip with the outfitter provideing the rig. Makes alot of sense. Byteme
     
  17. jimx200

    jimx200 Member

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    Gene and others, check out Sierra Trading Post as they have an excellent selection of reels at some very good prices...especially if you use a 20% off coupon that they send out when you get their emails. I see they have some made in USA reels too. My buddy has the Reddington and he swears by them. We striper and salmon fish and he's darn good with his setup. School teacher's post is spot on.

    http://www.sierratradingpost.com/search/SearchResults.aspx?allWords=reel&searchDescriptions=True
     
  18. skeezix

    skeezix Member

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    I fish for trout in western Montana. Once in a while bass, sometimes Steelhead in Idaho. You need to buy the gear thats right for what you are doing. A great bass rod is not going to be a great trout rod. I don't own anything shorter than a 9' rod (except for my 2 wt which I rarely use.) For trout think 4 wt or 5 wt, 9 ft, fast action, high modulus rod. The more expensive reels are nice- they have, generally speaking, good disk drags in them and you can get a fish on the reel and play it without worrying to much about breaking your tipet. Do you need them- no - you can play the fish with your hand and strip it in- or set the drag fairly loose and use your fingers to control drag- but a nice reel is sweet.

    I was told once upon a time, buy the best line money can buy, by the best rod you can afford, and if you have any money left buy a reel. If you get really hooked you'll want to spend more on a better reel, I use the open back Galvan reels on my 4 and 6 weights and I love them. I have a cast aluminum teton Tioga large arbor on my 8 weight I use for steelhead and bass, it works fine- nothing very delicate about the tippets or the drag necessary.

    Find a flyshop in your area that you can talk to- some are pretty cliqish and not very warm to the new guy or to the guy that doesn't want to drop $800 on a new rod. Some will help you out to no end. Wallmart is not the right place to go for advise- and if you pump the local flyshop for help and info- wallmart is not where you want to buy your stuff either. As FFwildcat points out, make sure your in good with your banker.

    Check out Recreation.Outdoors.Fishing.Fly on the Google groups newsgroups or the forums on Fly Anglers On Line lots of knowledgeable folks on either site that fish for pretty much anything imaginable.

    John
     
  19. Finprof

    Finprof TS Member

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    For trout you don't need much of a reel since the drag is not that important ecept for a really big fish in fast water.

    That said, I have a copy paper box full of Hardy reels of various sizes and models mostly the lightweight series but a few Perfects and a couple of St. Johns and St Georges. I love to hear the drag on a Hardy sing when a fish is taking out line. You don't need to hear that music, but it adds a lot to my enjoyment of the sport. Last September I took a few big Cutts and Rainbows in the 21-24 inch range on a borrowed Scientific Anglers plastic reel and cheap graphite rod. The fish played fine but it would have been more fun to hear a Hardy sing.
     
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