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Flinching before trigger pull

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by ram2008, Jun 22, 2009.

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  1. ram2008

    ram2008 TS Member

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    How does anyone get over flinching? I'm experienceing this problem sometimes just before my trigger pull, and it is causing me to miss the bird. I have done more rifle (fixed rest) shooting than trap shooting, and I think this is where my problem originated. Is there any way to overcome this bad habit? My stance is good, my gun point seems good to cover all birds, and I can get to the bird and follow it to place the shot... then I sometimes flnch before pulling the trigger. Does anyone have any ideas, or what worked for them? I checked my gun on the pattern board, and it is right on.

    Thanks... Richard
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    How does your shotgun trigger compare to your rifle trigger? Weight of pull, creep, etc. HMB
     
  3. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Richard- You have a common problem among trap shooters. You need to change something, don't keep practicing your flinch. First, try a heavier trigger pull. It is not difficult for a gunsmith to increase the force required to pull a trigger. Also, use lighter loads.

    The heavy trigger and lighter loads could help with the problem for a few years. But, at some point if you keep shooting trap, you will need a release trigger.

    Pat Ireland
     
  4. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    I have that flinch. For me it is called a "Crossfire". That means I point (aim of sorts) at the target and then my non-dominant eye takes over briefly and the sight picture goes askew and my brain ways wait. And that is a "flinch"
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Fred- I am not sure-- I live 3.5 hours West of Winchester. You can find a club contact at VATrap.com

    Pat Ireland
     
  6. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    If you are shooting two guns and one has a heavier trigger it can contribute to it.

    I really think you have a visual flinch. This can be caused by numerous factors.

    Not seeing the bird or looking at it properly is a major cause.
    You could be trying too hard and trying to aim. If the bird bead relationship is not correct it is hard to pull any trigger.
     
  7. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    I agree with gunfitter on this one. I have periodic episodes where my finger wants to pull the trigger but my brain says, "Not yet, dummy. You're not in the right place yet.". Invariably, when I reflect on it, there was something wrong with the way I say the target. Often, I realize that I was visually locked on the back of it rather than the front.

    Carol Lister
     
  8. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    I think both gunfitter and Carol Lister have identified one of the most prevalent causes for this, especially in trap shooting. Processing what's seen by the eyes and acting on that data is key. If you don't look at the target with eye intensity, it's tough to make the proper connections necessary for a successful shot.

    Sarge, my single barrel TM-1's trigger pull is 22 ounces and has been so for nearly 30 years! I've shot hundred straights on singles many times with it and had some very good scores at handicaps too, my best being a 99 from 27 yards.

    I do shoot with both a release and "good" pull triggers in my trap guns and score well with either. It's truly tough to get an O/U or semi-auto sear engagements set properly for target shooting because of safety reasons on the second shot machine gunning. Release triggers catch and set at a higher poundage and release in mere ounces making them more of a target trigger weight. That's impossible with an O/U gun or a semi-auto with a pull trigger. Either type of trigger works well when it's a consistent engagement with a crisp pull or a release trigger.

    Advising shooters to change to a release trigger when it's a vision problem doesn't solve a shooters eye problems at all. They then are using a trigger of mere ounces for firing rather measured in pounds and it seems to help because of the target quality let-off. Mileage's with either type will vary a lot depending on the real problem creating the "need" for something different.

    Hap
     
  9. code5coupe

    code5coupe Member

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    It seems that many of you are addressing the "failure to pull the trigger"-type of flinch, whereas Ram is asking about the other flinch: the one where you jerk the gun just before firing.
    If this is the case, most of the advice given so far will not help.
    I don't know what the answer is for your case, Ram, I wish I did since I sometimes suffer from the same thing.
     
  10. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    code5coupe, I'm with you, also looking for that answer. Recently I've found that holding the stock extremely tight into my shoulder with a very strong grip in the trigger hand has minimized or cut down on the times that I do that. That may sound strange to you as I believe that it's the leading hand that does the damage. Good luck, Bob
     
  11. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Sarge, the only parts I've ever changed on my P gun is the springs and one locking block. I once loaned it to a friend that didn't know a good trigger from Roy Rogers horse. A 70-80 handicap shooter so I let him practices a couple rounds with it prior to shooting it in competitions. I stood beside him making sure he knew the trigger was LIGHT! Only time in his shooting life did he ever break into the mid to high 90s on caps!!

    code5coupe, he may have a problem with the vision part regardless of how it plays out in terms of attempting to make a bad look at the target look right. We process data from prior successes in shooting trap. We know the look it takes, relationship wise, whether we're totally aware of the fact or not!

    I have to ask a question. Why is it that a flinch is most prevalent among trap shooters, as a whole? Good bird hunters don't suffer from the malady. International shooters can't use them yet great scores are shot with puny loads, compared to ours? I have my own theory, trap angles are among the easiest of all shotgun sports! Looking at a clay target, almost, sailing straight away becomes boring after a while and our eyes get lazy in looking at them. Leo Harrison uses a pull trigger yet he continues to set shooting records! Jimmy Heller uses a pull trigger and he continues breaking great scores! Other great shooters use a release and break great scores, so where is the real differences? The differences I see between us peons and the top shooters is their ability to hone in on each and every clay as if it was the most important one ever? It's all about how we learn to use our vision skills to our advantage instead of taking it for granted!!

    Hap
     
  12. CharlieP

    CharlieP TS Member

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    I feel for you. I learned, starting at age 11, how to shoot a rifle. Lots of good instruction from pros, many, many hours on the firing line. I learned to shoot a rifle well, and those skills learned at a young age are still with me. In the fifty years since then I have not done much rifle shooting, but I can still shoot better than 95% of rifle shooters. It's all hard-wire programed, and as natural as breathing.

    I was in my thirties when I took up shotgun shooting. I had expert instruction, practiced long and tried hard. I've probably fired 10X as many shotgun shells as I have rifle cartridges, but it's still not the natural, no-thought process like rifle shooting is. I have to work at it, every shot.

    I've never had a flinching problem, but I do have a concentration problem which I have to control on every shot. What works for me, and may work for your flinching problem is this - every time, just before I call for the target, I ask myself - "do you want to break this target or not? If I answer 'yes', then I say to myself: Concentrate on the target and NOTHING else. Look at it, glare at it, want it, kill it. Keep your head on the stock and concentrate on the target ONLY."

    Like I said, i don't have a flinching problem, but when I'm shooting correctly, I absolutely never feel any recoil at all. The target is everything, nothing else counts.

    And...you must shoot a gun you really like...preferably a gun which is not for sale by you at any price. If you don't love your present gun, then shop around. Beg and borrow guns until you find the one which fits like it is part of you.
     
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  13. Frank C

    Frank C Well-Known Member

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    save yourself a lot of ammo and wasted entry fees (and heartache) and go to the release now! and never look back
     
  14. ram2008

    ram2008 TS Member

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    I want to thank all of you for your input, and valuable info that you have posted here for me. I will first try and concentrate on the bird more sharply, and start shooting in front of the bird, and not "at" the bird, since most of my misses are behind, and under on the straights. Maybe I'm just trying too hard! I'll get my BT-99 out in front of the bird, and see if I can place the shot string on the front, stopping the bird on the break. This will tell me how the pieces fall, then I will know that I'm at least in the "neighborhood" of honeing in on them, and smokin them, with clean hits. If not, maybe as you have said, time to fit a release trigger.

    Thanks again...

    Richard
     
  15. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Richard- I suggest that you not try to shoot in front of the bird. Just look at the bird and let your gun take care of the rest. If your head is down on the stock and you look at the bird, your gun will automatically go to the right place. Don't aim your gun, trust your gun to do the right thing.

    Pat Ireland
     
  16. mike b.

    mike b. Member

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    Code5coupe, Sometimes ?????? Sending you an email of my 1st coupe. mb
     
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