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\\\ Fitting a Stock to a Receiver Frame ///

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by skip, Apr 19, 2007.

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  1. skip

    skip Member

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    Is anyone familiar with fitting an after market stock to a receiver frame? I’m looking at a new stock that has been rough machined, ready for final fitting. I assume final fitting means where the stock meets the receiver frame.


    Is it necessary to use an epoxy or acraglass type product for the final stock to frame fit or is the epoxy used only if a mistake is made?


    Not sure how thin epoxies can be applied and still have any strength or adhesion to the wood. One article I read used a type of marking device to locate high spots for removal, of course I can’t locate the article now.


    Thanks
     
  2. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    Once I have a stock fitted, I do prefer to glass it. This will prevent the end grain from compressing, which could/can cause wood splitting.

    Go the the Brownell's website. They will have everything you'll need to do a correct stock inlet....but of course, not the patience or the skill.

    I've done many semi-finished stocks, and about 50% already had the gaps before the chisel even got to it. I think the stockmakers have two processes for machining a stock. One process is the one that they'll be fitting to the gun, and the other is if you're going to do the fitting.

    I hope your's is the first process. I'd hate to see you get frustrated when the top center tang cut is not centered to the bottom one. This is probably the biggest problem I've run into.

    Doug
     
  3. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Skip- Inletting a stock can be both fun and very frustrating. It takes some time, skill and a few specialized hand tools. It is my opinion that the wood and metal should fit very well and then a little more wood removed and a glass bedding material can then be used.

    There are many ways to coat the receiver with something to mark the high spots on the wood. I have used spray oils, carbon film from a kerosene flame but feel, a good eye and experience works best. It can be a rather tricky job. If this is your first inletting job, and you have no intentions of doing many more, I suggest that you do not begin the job. Give it to someone else.

    Pat Ireland
     
  4. skip

    skip Member

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    Doug and Pat


    Thanks for the comments and suggestions. I purchased a new factory second/repaired stock on ebay for 60 dollars. I would like to learn more about the process and procedures needed to fit the wood to the receiver.


    In particular what tools are typically used to do this. I have several different width wood chisels and if any large amount of wood needs to be removed, a dremal tool.


    I also have an assortment of machinest tools for measuring.


    Is this process best done on a milling machine or can it be done by hand?


    Thanks again
     
  5. $$$SHTR

    $$$SHTR Member

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    Be very careful with inletter's black!!! It gets on everything!! Other than that, just take your time and the end result will be great. I've done 2 Wenig stocks so far and both turned out like a pro did the work. Always makes you feel good to know you did it yourself.

    Tomas
     
  6. JLW

    JLW TS Member

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    I use a home made smoke lamp, burning paint thinner, to smoke the metal for a good spot. Light it when ready to use and blow it out when complete. Buring it constantly will produce a lot of soot. Mine was made from a small jelly jar and a oil lamp wick from the hardware. I don't like "Prussian Blue" as it has an oil base that soaks into the wood. Anything you use to spot or mark the wood is messy. This is a messy job so take your time.

    If you have a tang bolt or something similar, use it as a "guide" or locating device to slide the receiver in for spotting.

    Small chisles, carving tool size are good; larger butt chisels will be too large for most of this work. And....watch the flow of your grain. Cutting into the grain with a chissel could cause a split.

    A set of curved "Swiss Grobet" files will be helpful. A set of needle files for removing small amounts of wood will load up quickly, so get a file card to clean the teeth.

    A small scraper will be handy as will finger nail files or emery boards.

    Flex shaft, pencil type grinders are best for "hogging" or removing large amounts of wood but can be used for fine wood removal if you are careful. I'd stay away from hand held Dremel style grinders as the body is too large to get into the slot. When you start getting close to having it all fit, proceed slowly and use your files and snadpaper. -Jerald
     
  7. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Jerald gave a good description of tools. I would suggest that burning kerosene makes more black soot faster than paint thinner. I would add to his suggestion of one scraper, several scrapers of different sizes and shapes. Do not forget a good light and some sort of vice.

    Pat Ireland
     
  8. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    I use a lot of different sized scrapers. They are like a straight wood chisel, but have a 90 degree bend, anywhere from 1/8" to 1/2" from the cutting edge.

    The scrapers are very manageable to control. You can scrap where only neccessary.

    Sometimes you have to be careful when using the stockbolt as a guide. The stock bolt hole may not always be in the center of the rec's inletting.

    Instead of using your Dremel tool, which can be kind of clumsey, go to the ENCO tool site or the MSC tool site. They've got little air powered pencil grinders for less than $50. You will also need the little water trap and oiler for it. They're cheap also. I like to use this for the clearance issues on the inside for the hammers and such.

    With regards to files, get a variety of small flat parallel and some rifflers(MSC) The files can be had in different aggressive cuts. I prefer the Swiss Grobet files, way more than the Nickelsons. Get the files in 00cut, 1-cut, 2-cut. The parallel files do not have a cutting edge on the sides. If you have any files that have touch steel in any way, forget about using them, they will just not cut very well on wood. Use only new files, or files that have only been used for woodworking.

    When you have the receiver half way into the inletting, this is the time to check to see how center the receiver is to the stock. If it needs to be shifted a little sidto side, you'll still have enough material to accomplish the correction.

    One last thing, most of the chisels you pick up will not be sharp enough. You'll need to touch up all of the edges. Get a nice flat stone.
     
  9. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    maclellan1911- It sounds like the chisels you are planning to use are 1/4 inch or larger wood tools that are designed to be driven with a hammer. For stock work you need small hand chisels that are designed for carving. I frequently changed the angle of the cutting surface with a for the specific job at hand. A thin sharp blade tends to cut into the wood too deep when going with the grain but is good going across the grain. You need to learn to sharpen your own blades to best accomplish the job you are doing. Different types of wood, and different stocks of the same type of wood may require different cutters.

    Pat Ireland
     
  10. skip

    skip Member

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    Thanks for info on the chisels, nice set of tools.


    The link is above.
     
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