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Fishing in Canada?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Questor, Dec 31, 2007.

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  1. Questor

    Questor TS Member

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    I was thinking of taking a fishing trip and a hunting trip to Canada but changed my mind when I learned of the late nearly arbitrary rules that are used to turn Americans away. Things like 30 year old DUIs and shoplifting charges. I don't have anything like that, but who knows what kinds of questions will be used to turn me away at travel time. Mexico and Argentina here I come!

    I think if Canada is going to have rules that are applied at the border, then they should go to a visa system where crossing the border is assured so long as you can acquire the visa.

    There was an article in today's Minneapolis Star-Tribune about how one U.S. lodge profits by sportsmen who are turned back.
     
  2. Two Dogs

    Two Dogs Well-Known Member

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    Questor.........The fishing is lousy,stay home.....
     
  3. Questor

    Questor TS Member

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    My complaint isn't with DUI, or any specific offense. The problem appears to be the that the rules change frequently and that if they were to change between the time a deposit is made and the time I get there, then I put myself in jeopardy of not being able to enter the country without paying a fine.

    According to what I've read, they allow "provisional" entries that allow people to enter, but it costs an extra $200. Seems kind of hokey to me.

    Visas are typically used for travel like this, so it's odd that Canada hasn't adopted their use.
     
  4. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    "I was thinking of taking a fishing trip and a hunting trip to Canada but changed my mind when I learned of the late nearly arbitrary rules that are used to turn Americans away. Things like 30 year old DUIs and shoplifting charges. I don't have anything like that, but who knows what kinds of questions will be used to turn me away at travel time."

    Why do you want to accuse the Canadians of being "arbitrary"? The information regarding their border regulations are readily available to anyone who has the slightest interest in finding out what they are before they plan a trip into Canada.

    The US State Department web site is updated for each change in Canada's entry regulations which don't change nearly as frequently or as secretively as you seem to think they do. And it's just plan sloppy planning to fail to contact Canadian Immigration with your questions before you pay for a trip. Here is an excerpt from the above web site:

    <Blockquote>"You may be asked if you've been before a judge. What they're looking for here is felony convictions, DUI charges, and other major crimes, which will probably keep you from crossing the border. Minor traffic violations [speeding, parking, tailgating, etc] won't. If you have been convicted of a serious crime, regardless of how long ago it was, you'll need to fill out an application from Canadian Customs or a Canadian Consulate detailing such things as the crime, itself, your employment history, and proof that you attended rehab or soemthing equivalent. Your mileage may vary; they may ask for more information. The processing fee for this form is $150.

    A lot of readers have been asking details about this form; where to obtain it, how much the fee really is, what convictions it will pardon. This information has been difficult to come by. Of course, I've put up this webpage as a one-stop source of information about passing through Canada Customs and back through US Customs, but there is, inevitably, some information that I may not have here. Regarding getting into Canada after being convicted of a crime, contact Canada Immigration or your nearest Canadian Consulate. The United States State Dept website does state that <I>"Section 19 of Canada's Immigration Act prohibits the admission of people who pose a threat to public health, safety, order, and national security. Prior to attempting a border crossing, American citizens who have had a criminal conviction in the past must contact the nearest Canadian embassy or consulate well in advance to determine their admissibility as visitors into Canada. If found inadmissible, an immigration officer will advise whether a waiver (Minister's Permit) is possible."</I></blockquote>

    Morgan
     
  5. Questor

    Questor TS Member

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    Capt Morgan:

    It's because the system is in flux and the recent anecdotes are that the history of enforcement has been spotty. Although the regs have been on the books for a long time, there was a history of non-enforcement, today it's spotty enforcement. When it's not applied consistently, it's arbitrary. Part of the problem is that the application of new techology for background checks appears to have some flaws in it. These flaws affect Canadians as well as Americans.
     
  6. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    I go to Ontario 4-5 times a year. I'll be leaving in 1-1/2 weeks for my annual "Laker" trip. Lake trout through the ice on a short rod and reel, 80 foot deep, is hard to beat, along with a few crappies 16-18 inches.

    I spend no longer than 5 minutes..ever... at the crossing. This fall I went up grouse hunting and fishing. I had downloaded the neccessary paper work before leaving. The Canadian customs were as polite as can be. Their handling of my guns good have been a little better. Of course, I think they lack the experience in that area. Their gov't wouldn't even allow them to be armed while at work.

    Any way, if you have a DUI less than five years old...forget about going.

    5-10 years, you'll need to get a "pardon" after filing the neccessary paper work, and paying a "fee" of around $400.

    10 years or more and they consider you "re-habbed" and you should be good to go.

    Take a look at this webite (above) and it'll give you all the info you need.

    I live in the Brainerd, MN area of MN. Possibly the best fishing in the whole country, but it gets crowded. Canada doesn't.

    Doug
     
  7. noseeam

    noseeam TS Member

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    Shawn,I fail to differ with you on criminal's,since when is a DUI make you a criminal?There is a big differance between a DUI and DWI.
    I have been to Canada four times on a fly in fishing trip out of Red Lake
    Ontario since 1991. Yes, I had a DUI in 1987 no problems crossing the border.
    Yes, I still have a gun and shoot quite a lot of trap.
    If I was a criminal I would have to get rid of my Kolar.

    With all due respect

    Bocephas

    Charles Beard

    Sponser and proud of it

    Stonghurst, IL.
     
  8. white rattler

    white rattler Member

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    Shawn, Happy New Year to you and your family. Trevor Dawe.
     
  9. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Every time I've had to go to Canada, it has alswys been a problem. That includs auto and air. I have been all over the world and that country is the worse, in terms of hassels at the border.
     
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