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First coyote on first ever hunting trip......

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Brian in Oregon, May 29, 2009.

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  1. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
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    This is a photo of Chase, who is a friend of my son (Sean). He's never been hunting before. Any kind of hunting. But he was interested and wanted to learn. Since it's between seasons, coyotes and varmints are the way to start. Sean broke out a bunch of my coyote hunting DVDs, as well as hunters safety material, and they've been going over it all.<br>
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    Today was the big day. We got all or equipment together and headed out to my mother-in-law's ranch. Had Sean take point, and I followed with Chase. Told him that it was an absolute must he follow my instructions exactly, and to watch the muzzle. Explained this is what I do with anyone who has no field experience in firearms handling. We had no problems, and his firearms handling was exemplary.<br>
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    Chase has a Bushmaster M4 clone, but it has not been sighted in. I explained that we did not want to sight it in before hunting, and that instead we'd set him up with Sean's camo'd 1187. The terrain we were going to be hunting in favored shotguns anyway.<br>
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    The first two stands were a bust. I suggested we hike to the far side of the ranch, in a corner that I hadn't called in for a while, instead of sighting in his rifle. This area was logged 20 years ago, and has a lot of vine maples and blackberries in it now, plus some oak trees that were not dropped. It's surrounded by heavy woods with lots of fir. We sat up where three logging roads came together. Sat back to back against an old growth stump that was inexplicably left in the intersection.<br>
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    Chase is left handed, and Sean's 1187 is right handed. So I instructed Chase to sit, flip the safety off, finger off the trigger, and partially shoulder the gun. If there was action, it would be so fast that he might miss it trying to flip the safety off. Had him sit, knees up, and premount the gun.<br>
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    Set up the caller, and started playing the cottontail distress blues.<br>
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    About 15 seconds into the call - BOOM! It was so soon that I thought maybe Chase had accidentally fired his gun. My son said, "YOU GOT HIM!". I got up and the two were moving over to the coyote, which was 20 feet away. I told them to stop, wait, and asked if their guns were safetied. Yep, both had the safeties on. The coyote had burst out of the undergrowth, skidded to a halt 20 feet from Chase, then spun to flee just as Chase hit it obliquely from the rear with a full load of #4 buckshot through a full choke. It looked like most of the 41 pellets got him. He had holes in his rear, side, neck, and on the backside of all four legs. Since he was still gasping, I put him out of his misery. I have no qualms about killing animals, but I won't tolerate suffering.<br>
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    What an experience. First hunting trip and he scores a coyote on it!<br>
    <br>
    (ps - Mike P, does the barrel on the 1187 look familar?)
     
  2. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    3,859
    Lucky man to have a fine son to share his wisdom and love of ther outdoors with.. Wish it was me.. Maybe next life.. All Good.. Mike
     
  3. Colonel Reb

    Colonel Reb TS Member

    Joined:
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    166
    That's a great hunt. I have hunted for them several times but never got one. Most of the top coyote hunters agree that taking a coyote is much more difficult than a deer.
     
  4. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    Col Reb, that probably depends a lot upon locale and local populations. I find coyoting is less difficult and more productive than deer hunting. If it's the technique they're referring to, yes, you do have to work your calls or caller, judge wind, hit a smaller target, etc. But those aren't all that difficult.
     
  5. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    I was on E. bound RT-161 near Beech Rd which is just East of New Albany OH. and out there in the field was a coyote just sitting, I stopped and watched him and him me, for about 5 minutes then he walked into the fence row and trees and laid down, it was in the heat of the day about 12:30, and this was a big Coyote about the size of a German Shepard, I would guess 40-50 lbs. No gun and I was on the berm of the hi-way.


    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  6. blizzard

    blizzard Active Member

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    Good job Brian !!!!!!!!
     
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