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First Bonehead Mistake with my PW 800C

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by dannyw68, Nov 18, 2009.

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  1. dannyw68

    dannyw68 Member

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    Jan 25, 2009
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    Well, I am officially an idiot. I sat down to reload a batch of 500 shells the other night for a big weekend shoot and realized that my PW needed a good cleaning, which is no big deal. I clean out the powder and shot bushing assembly, the shell plate assembly, re-lube everything and reassemble. It feels like a new loader again... awesome.

    So I begin loading shells and everything is going good. I have a movie playing on TV that I'm not watching, just something to break up the silence. I guess it was enough to distract me from realizing that I didn't have to fill up my powder hopper as often as usual. At any rate, I finished up and noticed that the powder switch lever in not quite fully in the on position... oh shit, when did that happen. I must have bumped it at some point while loading. And all of my shells are in a 5 gallon bucket below my loading bench.

    So I cut a shell open, no powder. I cut open another, there is powder but only a half charge. I dig down to the bottom of the bucket hoping to find out if they are all bad and guess what... NO POWDER!! Basically, all my shells are screwed.

    I investigated a little and it turns out that the powder switch lever has quite a bit of room to move before it will block the powder from falling into the shell so this was not the problem. The problem was that I put the powder bushing gear back into the machine incorrectly. I usually line up the last gear tooth with a reference point on the metal housing. Well, disassembling the machine meant that the gear teeth on the transfer bar were no longer lined up the same. So when I put the gear back in as usual, it was actually 3 teeth off. At best, my powder bushing was half open which gave me a combination of zero powder and partial powder charges.

    So I've just finished cutting open 500 shells to reclaim the components. I will never make that mistake again! It actually makes me paranoid now so I am constantly checking the powder hopper to see if its moving.

    P.S. PVC pipe cutters work wonders for cutting open shells.
     
  2. 1oz

    1oz Member

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    Location:
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    You aint the only 1 .About 200 for me thanks for the tip on the pvc cutter
     
  3. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    <I>"P.S. PVC pipe cutters work wonders for cutting open shells."</I>

    Shell cutters work better because you can reuse all the wads instead of wasting them using pipe cutters.

    MK
     
  4. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    That's why I box them as they come off the loader - problems are often discovered before hundreds of shells are loaded (no powder = dished crimp). Of course, with the way P-Ws eject the finished shell at the back, that's not easy.

    Ed
     
  5. ShooterOne

    ShooterOne Member

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    Dannyw68: I don't quite follow your comment "I usually line up the last gear tooth with a reference point on the metal housing."

    Every P/W loader that I have seen & dis-assembled had a "punch mark or indention on the plastic shot & powder gear that was to line up with matching indentions on the flat metal "indexing" gear rack bar.

    To me it is a "fail proof" system to install indents of the gears and rack to line up and cycle the machine once to verify the correct alingment and then finish putting the machine back together.

    Good Luck.
     
  6. dannyw68

    dannyw68 Member

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    Huh, I never noticed any punch or indentation. Its probably there, I just never saw it. My comment is what I think went wrong. The only time I ever remove the gear is when the bushing wont come out by itself. When I do, the last gear tooth is usually aligned with the corner of the metal house. I think the transfer bar with the gear teeth was moved when I put the round bushing gear back in.

    As far as using a PVC pipe cutter, you can still reuse the wads. Just don't cut all the way through. Just squeeze it till it breaks the surface of the hull then rotate. The only thing thrown away is the hull.
     
  7. 2@8lo

    2@8lo TS Member

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    Oct 13, 2007
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    Don't feel bad One night back when I was a single lad(ahh the good old days) I was loading shells and chatting away on the phone to a fine young lady and just talked and talked and eventually noticed that hundreds of shells got loaded with no powder in them. The powder resivoir had run dry and I had a primer tray extension on it that held 300 primers.
    I'm sure it wasn't my first bone head move and positive it won't be the last just one of my better ones.
    Jim
     
  8. rick979

    rick979 Active Member

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    The powder and shot bushing gears (round) have a stamped index mark on the top that must be lined up with the drive gear (straight) index marks. Don't line it up using the "count the teeth" method. Also the shutoff plates can move on there own out of the detent positions ("on" can move to "off") while you are in the loading process. If you want to be paranoid check the positions of the shot and powder shut off levers frequently during your reloading or you could end up with another 500 shells to cut open. Respectfully submitted. Rick ~~~Texas
     
  9. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    Also, when/if you remove the shut-off plates themselves, be careful of the ball-bearings located in the aluminum reservoir at 3:00 and its coil spring.

    I invariably pull out the shut-off plates and the ball-bearing exits down and out of the machine, only to be found days later.

    HINT: When removing the shut-off plates, you actually use its handle unscrewed and then re-screwed into the center of the plate vertically, and then wiggle it up and out. This is when the ball-bearing launches.

    Careful when re-inserting these plates. They are marked "S" and "P" respectively AND these marks are to be placed face down upon reassembly.

    Whiz
     
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