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First Aid Kits @ Your Range??

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by fssberson, Jun 30, 2007.

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  1. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    Do you know where your first aid kit is located at your range or gun club? Do you know what is in it? How many people at your club have been first aid certified? Maybe now is a good time for someone at your club to "take point" on this... As old as most of us are, we may need this kit sooner than we would like. Fred
     
  2. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    I have a complete first aid kit in my vehicle at all times with instant ice and instant hot packs and even has rubber gloves ... You never know, you know ..? WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  3. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    And, if someone has a heart attack at the club....

    http://www.losttarget.com/defib.htm
     
  4. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    no heart attack provisions. First aid kit is of common variety. Not sure how it would help with a shooting accident. Raises a question what should we have on site for emergency kit.
     
  5. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Our Park's Department provides a fully-stocked emergency kit, like one would find at any municipal building. We do not have a defibrulator(sic?!). As a Range Officer we are instrcuted to call 911, fortunately the hospital is literally across the street!

    No desire to blow our 100% safety record anytime soon!
    Jay
     
  6. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    Are 911 numbers posted? First aid kits with large gauze and bandages to treat gun shots? Trained members in first aid? Does your club actually have its own first aid kit with CPR masks? Do your EMT's know where your club is located if they get a call? Do your cell phones work at your club? Snake bite? Heat stroke? Etc.??? OR IS YOUR CLUB IGNORING ANY EMERGENCY?? Fred
     
  7. mallardfilmore

    mallardfilmore TS Member

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    If you're on a shooting range you should have a tube of Quick Clot and the GPS coordinates to the largest open area at or near the club in case you need to call in a bird for transport. Works good if the ambulance service or law enforcement have a way to plug them in on their vehicles and it'll save a lot of time.
     
  8. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    Good idea and you can use the trap field itself, at least at our range. It is flat and very large. I know I am going to prepare instructions for our nearest fire department if they need to respond. I am more concerned about heart attacks and rattlesnake bites than gun shot wounds. I bet that most gun club members don't know where the club's first aid kit is or if it has been re-stocked in a year. A defibulator cost about $1,200 and requires about an hour of training and will give a heart emergency a much better chance for survival. But there is not a club that has one. Fred
     
  9. Len in Phoenix

    Len in Phoenix TS Member

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    Our club has both an EMT and an MD as members. Our kit is basically a battlefield trauma kit minus the controlled substances.

    We also have the GPS coordinates of the range posted with the emergency numbers, and have had the local ambulance/fire crews actually visit the range to check travel time and familiarize them with the route.

    It's very nice on SCTP introduction days to answer the "medical attention" questions from the parents by having our on-site MD step forward. <big grin>

    Len in PHoenix
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    fssberson- You suggested that clubs have the "911 telephone numbers" posted. My club does not. We assume that most would know the 911 emergency number is 911.

    Several times over the years, I did have to call EMS to assist with a serious problem at the VA State shoot. One thing I always did was post a person at the entrance to the club and others at strategic points on the club grounds to point the ambulance to the correct place. I would not expect an EMS crew to know how to drive to field 9 at the club.

    I did call the local EMS several times to treat severe heat strokes, one case of insulin shock, three heart attacks and one time to transport a shooter who died on the bench.

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    Fssberson, you may be right by saying most clubs do not have a defibrillator, but you are not right when you say that no clubs have them.

    The Cedar Falls Gun Club in Iowa has one.

    Hauxfan!
     
  12. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    I've never been at a club where someone was shot.

    The big emergency at my club in the summer is usually Bee stings. I've been surprised of how many have had reactions to Bee stings, mostly wasp and hornet stings. Minor reactions, but it could have easily went to the extreme.

    First aid kits are a must, but we are most likely looking at someone having heart problems or a minor stroke.

    Look around the club and check out who's shooting...

    911 at most clubs will not be timely in regard to heart problems. Mouth to mouth and all of that is usually pretty useless. Ask any EMT.

    Maybe a fun shoot dedicated to a purchase of a defibrillator or a timely donation to the club will ensure a purchase.

    -------------------

    From the NC Times, Saturday, June 30, 2007

    Two key points to remember, say the experts:

    - Call 911 immediately. It is important for trained personnel to re-establish ventilation and administer needed medications as soon as possible.

    - Chest compressions must be administered at a rate of at least 100 per minute. "For some people, this might be difficult to maintain," Sanders said. "After two or three minutes, you could get tired and need a break, so you should switch off with others."

    One last thing: For optimal results, emergency resuscitation should include the administration of electric shock from an automated external defibrillator. Their availability is proliferating "wherever a lot of people congregate,"

    Miller said. For instance, "in Las Vegas, they've saved a lot of lives. They teach security personnel how to use it."

    The defibrillators are effective only when cardiac arrest is caused by an electrical problem that causes the heart to quiver rapidly. This is the most common cause of sudden collapse, which kills about 900 people a day in this country. As it stands now, only one to three people in 100 survive if arrest occurs outside a hospital, but with improved resuscitation techniques and more frequent use of defibrillators, more will survive.
     
  13. C H S

    C H S TS Member

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    Who messed up the text on this thread? Mine is big and real black instead of looking like it usually does.

    Andy
     
  14. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Joe- You are correct in stating that mouth to mouth ventilation is at best, marginally effective. But, it does become exciting when the victim vomits into the mouth of the person giving mouth to mouth. This is not uncommon.

    Pat Ireland
     
  15. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    Pat,

    I was a Paramedic and have first hand experience in mouth to mouth and sharing another persons lunch ... You must then clear the air way of any and all obstructions and continue ... In the event of a heart attack and you are working on the patient you really do not have time to think about it until its over ...


    "The defibrillators are effective only when cardiac arrest is caused by an electrical problem that causes the heart to quiver rapidly". This is the most common cause of sudden collapse, which kills about 900 people a day in this country. As it stands now, only one to three people in 100 survive if arrest occurs outside a hospital, but with improved resuscitation techniques and more frequent use of defibrillators, more will survive.

    (This first sentence (above) of this statement as written is false) ...

    Paramedics use defibrilators on most calls that are Caridac Arrest related as a means to restart the persons heart by shocking the heart from outside of the body ... I have also resorted to actually kicking a pateint in the (left) side rib cage with the side of my foot to try to restart their heart ... When someones life is on the line you do what you have to do as best you can to keep them from expireing and use what ever you have available ... The Paramedics I know all used to carry "crash kits" with them with the exception of the drugs because if you are not on duty you are not covered by the "Good Samaritan Laws" and subject to being proscecuted if the person dies from something you do or did not do in provideing care for them (only in America)... The Good Samaritan laws my be different now and if they are its rightfully so ... I have saved many lives with the use of defibulators and the sides of my boots, I have also lost many by percentages its bound to happen ... A Paramedic without his "little bag of tricks an a MICU" is nothing other than a person who knows what has to be done and is not able to do it because they don't and cannot carry everything with them ... There is a BIG difference between basic first aid (first aid kit) and Advanced Life Support ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  16. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    As you can see by the discussion, training and equipment varies. Compressions are 30 to 2 [breaths]. Do the first aid kits have face masks or breathing devices? My statement about posted 911 numbers by telephones was meant to add: addresses to the range, directions for para medics, will some one meet them on the road and direct them in, etc. This thread is meant to encourage discussion AND safety drills. Just because we have the stuff does not mean that the doctor in the club will be at the club [heck he may be the victim]... our clubs need to hold training days for members. A little money and time spent today may save lives tomorrow. I encourage all clubs to review where the first aid kits are, check them out for completeness, hold training days, post emergency numbers by the telephone, etc. Have a safe rest of the year. Fred
     
  17. tachyon

    tachyon Member

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    </big>
    Len in Phoenix accidentally messed up the font. He did a ((big grin)) but put the words inside a less than and greater than sign. The software parsed it as an html tag and made the text big.

    I would recommend that you make sure your local 911 office maps your club correctly. There have been a couple of instances where the directions were to a club managers house instead of to the range. Some clubs have a mailing address different than the range address.

    Is there a commercially available first aid kit you would recommend for a club/high school team to have with them. We have three adults who have completed first aid training but we have not found a good first aid kit/list of what we should have in a first aid kit.
     
  18. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    Yes , some law enforcement agency actually have a shooting first aid kit which has bigger bandages, etc. However, any good first aide kit will do... just make sure it has the things that you are most likely to need. Many have been mentioned in this discussion. Make sure that you get liability waivers from the parents wich allows you to perfomr simple first aid, such as applying anti-sting or itch medication from over the counter drug stores. Fred
     
  19. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    First Aid supplies are important but it is also important to have the training to both recognize and know what to do in a critical situation. It is not simple to distinguish between something like an incomplete heart block and a heat stroke. Often keeping the person calm and cool and wait for help is best. It is best to have someone work on both your gun and your body who has some knowledge. Another good option is to require WPT to attend every registered shoot.

    Pat Ireland
     
  20. Steve-CT

    Steve-CT TS Member

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    I was an EMT-D (defibrillator) tech in the early 1990s. I've seen it work and convert V-fib back to normal sinus. In CT all EMTs are now Defibrillator certified. Back when I did it, it was an advanced rating

    It's important to have a plan in place for clubs; a liasion with your local FD
    or with whatever agency is responsible for providing EMS to know where your buildings and fields are and posting members to assist emergency vehicles to the site of the emergency. You would be surprised to learn how many agencies you would THINK should be staffed and equipped to handle EMS calls that are not. It depends on the locality and how their services are set up.

    Most of your emergencies will be of the cardiac/heat stroke/bee sting variety; also diabetic emergencies and the like.

    When I was certfied, I carried a BLS jump bag in my trunk as well. I've been away from it over ten years now.
     
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