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Finishing a new stock

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by nords, Mar 7, 2012.

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  1. nords

    nords Member

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    Would you us Tung oil?
     
  2. 2500 HD

    2500 HD Active Member

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    I used tung oil on an 1100 stock and it turned out really nice.
     
  3. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    Depends on what you want the finish to be.

    Basically there are three classes of finishes you can put on...

    First, is a spray finish - polyurathane or the like - just a few coats and done - tough as nails and you can put on finishes from flat to glossy.

    Next are 'varnish' types - more a brush on and allow to dry - tongue oil fits here. Many of these will have an oil or wax in them, but they are more like a surface finish as one would use on furniture. (A lot of stock workers use these to finish the internal parts of the wood to protect from water and oil)

    Last is the old oil/wax finish (think 'hand rubbed oil finish'). These involve some kind of carrier oil and a wax, and might have driers, etc. included. This takes MANY coats and lots of time. Less coats gives a more 'mat' finish, more coats a gloss finish.

    Needless to say, your choice as which way to go
     
  4. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Tung oil, the more coats you put on the better it gets. HMB
     
  5. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    I like Tru Oil. Makes the grain look 3D. .
    grntitan_2009_250326.jpg
     
  6. johnboy

    johnboy Member

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    I picked up a finish book in Woodcraft and browsed through it while wating on a friend. The author went into detail on different type finishes. I came to the conclusion that a lot of the oil finishes are a very poor choice for a firearm that will be exposed to moisture. I think a true oil finish is very nice to look at but not very durable. The reason that this was of interest to me was I had already applied several coats of a Danish oil finish to a M12 stock and forearm. The author pointed out that Danish oil was not a very effective moisture barrier. Back to Trueoil. I would not recommend tung oil if the gun will be exposed to moisture.
     
  7. high 2

    high 2 Member

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    Danish oil works great, just not by it's self. You have to use the proper finishes to get everything sealed and grain filled first. Larry
     
  8. 682b

    682b Member

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    Tru-oil does look amazing. If you are refinishing a stock that will spend most if not all of it's life on the sidelines it's great. If you are going to shoot it as a regular shooter you should look at a finish that is harder. When you get a harder finish generally it is harder to apply properly. The exception is custom gun oil sold by Brownell and others. It comes in a spray can and also liquid to be hand applied. There are no miracle finishes that I have found. You still have to follow the rules (like filling the grain, proper sanding and polishing.) Good luck Bigboy
     
  9. 2500 HD

    2500 HD Active Member

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    I finished that 1100 stock on my 20 ga lt with tung oil and have used it on 3 rabbit hunts, not busting brush (thats what the hounds are for) but none the less was out in the snow, and so far you swear it looks like I have not used it. Time will tell. Is there a harder finish you can put over the tung oil to prevent handling marks and protect it from moisture???
     
  10. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    The wonderful thing about Tru Oil is that you can repair scratches easily. I even used it to repair a 1 inch square chipped off piece of a spray finish. I'll bet you can't tell where the damage was without me pointing it out.
     
  11. Smokechaser

    Smokechaser TS Member

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    I finish and red alot of stocks. My finish of choice is Tru-Oil. Best start to finish than most of the others that have a professional look...

    Tung Oil, if done right, is a great finish, however, it takes forever to do it right. It's not a few hours to dry and start your next coat as in Tru-oil. We are talking days to dry between coats if you want it done right. I do them at a customer's request, but the cost is more and the turn-around time is way more...

    I've tried the quick finish products and don't like any of them. No depth, and tough to repair with many...

    Baked on -- well, it's up to you...

    Oh, yes, forgot linseed oil. Cheap and better left for military weapons. Never liked fungus on my firearms. You get the picture....
     
  12. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Kind of a horse a piece in my eyes. The Tru-Oil definitely makes the wood grain pop just because of the oil factor. If allowed the time to cure it is not that soft. However, if you use the two-part acrylics, and urethanes they tend to cure so hard that repairing is very difficult. The repaired, refinish will not bond as well because of this, like oil does. These finishes also are on the surface of the wood and do not soak into the wood as a oil does. Thus the grain is not as defined.

    So, you can go with oil that tends to be softer, defines the character of the wood, and is more repairable. Or you can go with more durable, less defining, and less repairable. Jon
     
  13. shaggist

    shaggist Member

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    The old time formula for finishing a stock with tung oil is:

    Once a day for a week;
    Once a week for a month;
    Once a month for a year;
    Once a year for the rest of your life.

    The last stock I did, I ended up putting 15 coats on, each one hand-warmed and hand-rubbed, using just enough tung oil to coat the surface and wiping off any excess. It came out beautifully, accenting the grain very well, and was tough enough for any normal usage, as well as being waterproof.

    Having not used Tru-oil, I can't speak for it, but some of the stock finishes I have seen where it was used are marvelous. It would depend, like any great finish, on your preparation of the stock and the time you spend drying and sanding after each coat.

    Hand finishing stocks is a labor of love not for the impatient.

    Jack
     
  14. StansCustoms

    StansCustoms Well-Known Member

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    I'm curious about how to deal with the checkering when refinishing a stock. I've done a couple of smooth wood stocks back when I was teenager...but don't have a clue if there is a special way to do the checkering or not.

    In fact I have one gun..that only needs the checkering under the palm grip touched up. It's a lot lighter due to sweat I guess..

    Stan...
     
  15. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Stan,

    After I was done with the stock and forearm I used the same Tru Oil for the checkering. I mixed it 50/50 with Mineral Spirits and applied it very carefully with a couple of small artists paint brushes.
     
  16. StansCustoms

    StansCustoms Well-Known Member

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    Grntitan..

    Ok that answers the application...what about prep, you can't really sand it..?

    Stan..
     
  17. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    It depends on what extent your refinish is. If you are removing color and going down to bare wood, the liquid strippers and a soft bristled paint brush work great. If you are simply just changing the clear, afters just a matter of cleaning the checkering and applying the finish. I simply removed the masking and cleaned the checkering real well with Mineral Spirits and let it dry. Then I applied the Tru Oil like I stated above.

    At least this is the method I used.
    grntitan_2009_2503106.jpg
     
  18. nords

    nords Member

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    If the stock hasn't been checkered. Finish first or after? I've heard of both.
     
  19. StansCustoms

    StansCustoms Well-Known Member

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    I have two guns that everything is fine except the checkering on the forearm on one and the grip on another..both Brownings. (both are places where the gun is actually gripped...)

    Either gun would still be VERY nice except for the two places I mentioned. Can I tape off the two checkered areas...and clean them with mineral spirits ..and then apply Tru-Oil?? The color in the checkering is quite a bit lighter in color than the rest of the wood (on both guns). ....or would the checkered areas still be light colored, after applying the Tru-oil?

    Thanks...Stan
     
  20. MtnGun

    MtnGun Member

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    I fill/seal with Marine Spar varnish. First coats cut 50/50 with Turpentine. Then full. Finish is Lin Speed.
     
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