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Felt recoil discovery?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by ec90t, Aug 27, 2007.

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  1. ec90t

    ec90t Guest

    Wireguy,

    The other part of the equation is, "does the noise make you tense up suddenly and then percieved recoil is greater?".

    ec90t
     
  2. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    The affect of noise varies from one shooter to another but generally, the noise of a shell firing has a significant effect on felt recoil.

    Rollin
     
  3. buzzgun

    buzzgun Member

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    I remember the first time I tried earplugs as a beginner...the effect was similar to a Kentucky shooter getting his first pair of shoes.

    Big difference.
     
  4. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    Some who flinch from time to time find that using muffs and plugs is a cure...

    Not in all cases, but is worth a try.
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    wireguy- First, your observation is correct. Additionally, noise can result in flinching just as easily as recoil.

    When I began trapshooting, ear plugs were not available. All of us carried a couple of cotton balls in our pockets and made plugs as best we could. Also, the filters from used cigarettes were also commonly used.

    Pat Ireland
     
  6. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Yeah, I've proven over and over, especially in handgun training, that the sound is as much a factor in sensing power and recoil as any other. When involved in action pistol shooting, I used both fitted ear plugs and the ear muff-type sound deadening and it was amazing how much it improved handling the gun. If it weren't the need for anti-cancer hats, I'd wear muffs still today. Before anyone jumps on that, I've tried the type that connect in the back of the neck but it's a no go for me.....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  7. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    Pat Ireland

    Careful, You are dating yourself and showing your age. Do you remember Kerosene powered TV's and the day's before Flintstones vitamins too? I do!

    Yes, the big bang theory works as a factor in the flinch theory. Also large flames out of the ejection port of an autoloader seem to have some effects on the shooter on your right during some of the back fence games at night.
     
  8. debateableone

    debateableone TS Member

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    Reducing recoil is part of the solution, the other part people forget about is a simple one! A Soft comb on your stock. Wood is a channel to your cheekbone for sound. Don't believe it take a piece of wood 2X4 or something large and hold it up like you would your gun to your cheek. Then have a friend hit it with something hard)wrench screwdriver whatever and notice how the sound is transmitted to your ear. Use your earplugs also. then try it with a piece of foam between the wood and your cheek. It all adds up to you want to get your face or cheekbone away from the sound. Crazy Idea well thats debateable!!
     
  9. Mark S

    Mark S TS Member

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    I bought a gun a few years ago that did not have an adjustable comb. I shot it for a while and decided it needed to have the comb raised. I purchased a foam pad that has a self stick backing made for this purpose. The pad was designed to drape over the comb and raise the height of the comb. The differance of the precieved sound level was astonishing. Probably 50 percent quieter with the foam pad attached to the comb.
    Plugs and muffs: modern military pilots are trained to use both plugs and the ear muffs that are a part of the flight helmet communication system, for the best noise attenuation. The muffs will dampen noise transmitted by the bones of the skull around the outside of the ear and the plugs lower the ambient noise levels that get into the ear cannal. Ask any of the Viet Nam era helocopter pilots with hearing loss. A great many of them did not use the plugs and relied on the muffs inside the flight helmets only. (I speak from experience)
     
  10. chipking

    chipking TS Member

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    It is not just the sound it is also the sharpness of the sound and color and size of the flash (if any) that will change how you perceive recoil. I used to shoot E3 in the winter and found that with my loads they felt like they had more recoil than the PROMO loads that I shot in the summer. However across the Chrono the velocities of the 1oz charge of Magnum 8s were the same. The real difference was the E3 loads had a sharper crack at firing and a small bright white muzzle flash. I have had several shooters do a blind trial on these loads and their response is the same as mine (EXCEPT) when shot in my buddies 1100 Remington they feel the same.
    --- Chip King ---
     
  11. smsnyder

    smsnyder Well-Known Member

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    very good point, soft comb, ear plugs and muffs might do the trick for some shooters.
     
  12. mrskeet410

    mrskeet410 TS Member

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    Never found muffs to help with a shotgun, but they were a big help when I shot magnum rifle off a bench rest...with tin sun shade.
     
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