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Eyes- Vitreous Detachment / Hemmorage

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by pyrdek, Jun 9, 2008.

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  1. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    Eyes- Vitreous Detachment / hemorrhage

    Just got back from the ophthalmologist. Once again getting old is a *****!

    I just had a full eye exam complete with dilation, OCT, Peripheral Vision field test and one or two other things I can't recall, two weeks or so ago. Then last Friday afternoon, a big old floater, with the typical long string look, pops up. Back to the eye doc. It was a classic Vitreous Detachment. When he looked he saw nothing overly alarming and told me to get to the ER if I started seeing a number of white flashes or detected a loss of a part of vision. Sunday night, here comes the flashes. Off to the ER.

    Checked out, complete with CAT scan of the eye and an ophthalmologist consult (at 1:30 A.M.) and appointment made for 8:45 A.M.

    Now I just got back from the third dilation in about as many weeks. It looks like a small vitreous hemorrhage, but without retinal tear, happened. The vitreous gel was showing a number of floaters. This also made it a bit difficult to locate a possible vitreous hemorrhage. It took a couple of different tests to locate what seems to be a vitreous hemorrhage.

    Next appointment in two weeks to see if the problem settles or if it grows. Also, be aware of what changes to look for that would warrant a call to him, no matter what day/time. Also advised to stop the shooting for a few weeks. ((DAMN!, this happens just when I was finally getting my act together to get some decent scores.) From what I saw and read, it looks like the first six weeks are the most critical time for complications.

    Now the question. Anyone here have any thing to share about what else to expect or how shooting, after the few weeks layoff, may be affected?
     
  2. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    Did either of your doctors comment on any affect shooting may have played in development of the condition?


    This possibility has always freaked me out a little...
     
  3. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    In my case it just seems that it was the luck of the draw. A brief summary is that as you get older the vitreous gel (fluid inside your eye)slowly changes from the thicker gel of youth to the more watery fluid of older folks. The thinner fluid "deflates the membrane (think of it as sort of a plastic bag) and it can pull away from the retina. This is quite common and is what gives you the notorious floaters that are small pieces shed from the cells in your eye. Maybe about ten percent of the time, when it pulls away it can cause a small bleed. This is the floater that looks like a string drifting around in your eye. This is what my luck brought me. It is not related to shooting although a severe jolt (harder than the recoil we are used to - more like a car accident or punch or, my guess, high power rifle recoil with your eye to close to the scope) can cause the same type of injury.

    I have never shown any problem with diabetes and my family doctor keeps a very close eye on me. In fact he found a problem that resulted in my bypass surgery taking place before any more serious problem occurred. Like I said, getting old is a *****!

    The Wikipedia link listed below gives a fairly good description.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posterior_vitreous_detachment
     
  4. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    I have what sounds like the same issue as pyrdek in both eyes, first the right one and then about 3 years later the left one also. Seems to get better with time altho' never goes back to the way it was before. It costs me a bird once in awhile if some of that blurry "stringy" looking stuff goes floating into the center of my vision right when I call for the target but I make do. Seems like it helps to NOT make a lot of unnessesary sudden head movements while waiting between shots.

    I agree.....getting old is a *****, better tho' than NOT getting old?

    Shootin' with eye floaters is a ***** too, but it's better than NOT shootin'

    John C. Saubak
     
  5. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    Prydek: I can give you a narrative of the same circumstances, but a couple years down the road.
    Though I have always had floaters back to when I was a little kid, one night two years ago I noticed a definite change in my right eye, and thinking detached retina I went to the emergency room at Duke Hospital. It was determined to be PVD like yours. I also started getting the flashing lights.
    About two months later, the same thing in the left eye. I had been warned about the "curtain" moving across your eye as the indicator of a detached retina.
    I shoot a 391, and put a soft-touch stock and soft pad on it to minimize any shock to my face. Whether that made any difference, I don't know.
    It is now two years later. Still floaters, still flashing lights. I am 69 years old and have never had diabetes.
    My problem is not losing targets from the floaters, it's gaining targets. I shoot sporting clay and once at a registered shoot, I shot a pair of difficult targets and walked off the station pretty proud that I had broken 7 out of 8. When I looked at the score card they had me marked for a 2. Trying not to sound like I was trying to buy a target, i asked the other squad members if that was the right score. It was.
    When I shot at the target, the floaters appeared to be pieces of what I thought was a broken target.
    Now, I just rely on the scorer or other squad members to call a target dead or lost.
     
  6. DocJim

    DocJim Member

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    Location:
    Indiana, PA
    Bottom Line: Make sure your doctor(s) are aware of your shooting, how much you shoot and the recoil you absorb THEN do precisely what they tell you regarding shooting. This is a great site for shooting info but a lousy one for medical advice. Can't afford to take chances with the eyes. Good luck. .....

    Jim G MD
     
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