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Eye exam info?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by esoxhunter, Apr 8, 2007.

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  1. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    2,064
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Phil: You really don't need an eye doctor that is a trapshooter. All you need is your prescription and to be sure you ask for the Pupillary Distance. With this information you can call Post 4, Decot, Ranger, etc and they will fix you up over the phone. I had Mike. (Post 4) make me a pair of shooting glasses a couple of years ago and I just called a prescription in to Decot about 2 weeks ago. Again, the only added information you need on your prescription is that Pupillary Distance measurement; which your doctor can provide. Ed
     
  2. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    1,313
    Location:
    Brillion, WI
    When changing from plano to prescription shooting glasses, getting the correct vertical optical centers on the new lenses can be problematic. The difficulty can be caused by a low gun mount or too little drop at the heel. Both make it necessary to tilt your head forward to place your cheek on the comb.

    This means that you must look "up" to look along the rib and results in your looking through a higher than normal portion of the lenses, whether plano or prescription.

    Obviously plano lenses will not cause a problem. Prescription lenses may, however. If you are not looking through the optical centers of the lenses, distortion (including shooting at targets where they only "appear" to be) and unnecessary eye fatigue can occur. A similar problem occurs if you turn your head very far toward the stock to align your eye with the rib - wide shoulders, a stance that is too square, i.e. a need for cast.

    It might be worth considering putting a dot on your current shooting lenses to mark where the optical centers should be ground on the new lenses. To do that, you will need an assistant. Point your gun at the assistant's eye and have him or her carefully mark the location on the lens in front of your pupil.

    You may also want to mark the lens for the pupil location when your are looking straight ahead without the gun being mounted. It may suggest something interesting about your gun mount. This can be useful if you don't have a full length mirror to use for the same purpose.

    Many shooters tilt their heads forward when they mount their guns because of their guns not fitting them very well or because of poor gun mounts. For this reason, most shooting glass frames mount the lenses higher than street glasses. That design feature may or may not compensate for any head tilting uses when you shoot.

    Rollin
     
  3. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

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    Mar 15, 2006
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    2,064
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Phil: I totally disagree with people that recommended that bi-focals are a waste of $$ on shooting glasses. The bi-focals placed on shooting glasses are smaller and positioned in a way that do not affect your shooting. It's is very useful to be able to wear your shooting glasses throughout the day at the Gun Club. You can easily read anything while you are at the shoot and not have to take off your shooting glasses and replace them with your regular glasses. I believe Decot charges an extra $40 to add bi-focals. Money well spent in my opinion. Ed
     
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