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Experts using a mill?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Sgt. Mike, Jul 13, 2008.

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  1. Sgt. Mike

    Sgt. Mike TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    I'm looking for someone who is an expert with a mill. This is something I've been thinking about getting for sometime but wanted some idea on the learning curve. Also what important features should be built in as well as extra tools to have. Would it be a good idea to look for a used commercial mill? Please e-mail. Thank you in advance. Michael
     
  2. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    7,759
    Varible speed control, Power table x/y axis, 42" table, digital readout 2 or 3 (prefered) axis. Floor model, table models are weak, depending on your projects.
     
  3. richrob

    richrob TS Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
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    Where are you located? We have two mills in our shop and only have room for one. We have a Bridgeport with digital readout and a Cincinnati. Both have lots of tooling. In the Chicagoland area. -Rich

    Also have an extra lathe if your interested in a whole set-up.
     
  4. KENENT1

    KENENT1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    1,392
    Location:
    Beloit, WI
    Last sumer I purchased a Lagun cnc with touch screen control and I am more than pleased with this machine, you would be amased at what you can do with a cnc...like ingraving, complex curves, bolt circles in a snap...

    If you are going to work it spend a little extra up front...you won't regret it.


    tony
     
  5. Sgt. Mike

    Sgt. Mike TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Thank you to everyone for your input. We are in the north central part of Missouri. Trapshooters have expert knowledge on a variety of subjects. Michael
     
  6. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    It really boils down to your budget. The ideal way to go is with a Bridgeport floor standing machine. There is no question that this is the way to go - if you have the funds. And by funds, I'm not just talking about the price of the machine. A Bridgeport is not going to do you one whit of good if you've depleted your budget getting it, and then discover you have no money for a proper milling vise, an angle vise, clamping kit(s), end mills (lots of different types), fly cutters, borers, various other cutting tools, specialized work holders, measuring instruments, and other accessories. These can easily add up to anywhere from half the cost of a mill to double the cost of a mill, depending on what all you need. Find a good machine tool supply company and get some catalogs with prices. Your eyes will pop when you start adding up costs.<br>
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    So, if you're on a budget, you can do it one of two ways. Get a Bridgeport and carefully buy only what you absolutely must have to get started, and add piecemeal as you go. Or get a decent vertical bench mill and get a lot of goodies, and learn how to use them. As you get better, farm some work out, then save your money for a Bridgeport down the road, keeping your vertical bench mill for small jobs or jobs that you don't want to change the current settings on the Bridgeport for.<br>
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    In my opinion, the number one factor for a milling machine of any kind is table length. Get the model with the longest table that you can afford. Nothing is more frustrating than having a table that won't travel the length of the work. You then have to unbolt the work and slide it, and that leads to error - specially with a vertical bench mill (a Bridgeport does better in this respect, but most Bridgeports already have a longer table than a vertical bench mill.)<br>
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    Don't let anyone tell you that you cannot do outstanding work on a vertical bench mill. You can. It is operator skill, not the machine. What IS the machine is how fast you can do that work. A Bridgeport is an industrial production machine. A good industrial Bridgeport can move five pounds of steel chips a minute. A vertical bench mill is not even going to move a half a pound of chips a minute, and if you try to, you'll have the table adjusters so loose that the work will not have a smooth finish. A vertical bench mill restricts you to being slow. This is not necessarily a bad thing for a beginner or a shop doing small jobs. It is for a tool and die company or a corporation, because the cost of manpower will more than offset the cost of the machine.<br>
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    So, if you don't mind my asking, what is your budget? And what do you want to do? That will determine which direction you'll be heading.
     
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