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Everyday Contact Lenses for Shooting?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Stl Flyn, Feb 7, 2013.

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  1. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    First I am way past due for an eye exam. Second I am done with Glasses. Never found any that fit. Tired of them slipping down, or up my nose, steaming up when I come in from the cold, distortion, depth perception, peripheral vision, etc. They are progressive lenses, I understand that has something to do with the vision problems mentioned. I also have Astigmatism, with the left eye being worse then the right. In any case, done!

    My question to the general shooters who have used Contacts for shooting, and everyday use is; What are the problems you have incurred due to the use of Contacts? I would prefer opinions of those that wore glasses, and changed to them for at least a month, or a season, as to have a time frame for adjustment. If you tried them once, and shot terrible, then changed back, well..... Also, any experiences with the RGP lenses, over the larger soft low-water content, or Silicon Hydrogel Lenses?

    Everybody's eyes are different, I understand. I have allergies, and sometimes feel that I may have dry eyes, which may be from the allergies. The reason for asking is not because I want to know if it improved, or hurt your scores, as I think improved vision can only help. I am looking for the difference they made with using them for every day use, and also using them for shooting, with using tinted, non-RX lens glasses. Also what about the near, and far sighted correction issue? One near, and one far sighted correction for example? Which eye is the close vision corrected lens? Reason I ask is, I shoot archery with a sight, and really do not want to have four different prescription lenses. Did anyone ever change the close vision correction lens, for a distance correction lens, for shooting only? In which case I would only need three different prescriptions. I have shot with both eyes open since I started shooting. Can't change, I tried.

    Thanks for your help, and if there are any shooting sports Optometrists reading this, I would appreciate your input as well. Thanks, Jon
     
  2. unplugged

    unplugged Active Member

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    I wear contacts every day. (if that is what you are asking)
    And I have both MONO vision (one eye for distance and one for reading)
    and another set for just distance (same right eye different left, for reading with mono vision. I'm near sighted and right eye dominate. So the only difference is I have two "corrections" for just my left eye depending on if I want "mono vision" or distance)

    That said I have tried mono vision for clays and hated it. I now use my distance lenses for shooting.

    I have "eye issues" too! Alergies and now "too much tear production" from chemo.
    I still would never go back to glasses for correction.

    hopr the helps.
     
  3. blizzard

    blizzard Active Member

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    I got glasses when I was 18 and switched to contacts 3 or 4 yrs later. So basically I've worn contacts for 18 years.

    The only problems that I've ever had with them is that by vastly improving my overall vision, no doubt is left when seeing or reading acts of that disgusting thing we refer to as liberlism.

    Other than that they're great.

    :)
     
  4. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    An eye doctor once told me..."Contact lenses are for people who want to LOOK good; eye glasses are for people who want to SEE good!"

    Keller
     
  5. blizzard

    blizzard Active Member

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    That's BS Keller. I see better with contacts, and I actually have peripheral vision. You won't get that with glasses. Goggles perhaps, but not glasses.
     
  6. bonzai272

    bonzai272 Member

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    I could never get used to contacts. Maybe I just wasnt getting the right kind. They always irritated me after a couple hours, drying my eyes out, and I felt it was harder to see/focus compared to glasses. Ive pretty much given up on them and now wear glasses full time. I even use RX lenses in my Ranger XL shooting glasses when I shoot trap. However, I feel it hampers my vision and affects my shooting (at least thats my excuse). Im now looking at Lasik eye surgery to finally get rid of relying on glasses or contacts all together. Then, I wont have any more excuses.
     
  7. IMGRV

    IMGRV TS Member

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    Hello - I've been wearing contact lenses since 1980 and have had all kinds of lenses. Back then there mainly was the type you kept for a year or two and cleaned and sterilized each night. FYI I am very nearsighted and have astigmatism in both eyes. But now I wear the daily type that cost less than a dollar a day (see website above for exact type). No one will ever see better with glasses than with contacts. All glasses are made with a "hot spot" unless they are single vision glasses (but there is still edge distortion with those), and this cuts down on clarity as you move your eyes without moving your head. With contacts, they are right on your eye and move with it - it is like having perfect vision. I only use single vision contacts - not toric ones and the gun sights are blurry to me but I hardly need to look at them except for a brief 1/2 second when mounting the gun. I also have dry eyes, and if that is a real problem, then you can buy re-wetting drops to put in about 5 minutes before shooting - and you'll be fine for the time it take to shoot one event of 100 targets. Try them out - you can usually get free trial pairs when fitted at your Optometrist. Hope this helps some. G.
     
  8. cbxchris

    cbxchris Active Member

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    Lasik........NEVER go back to glasses or contacts
     
  9. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the helpful replies. I would be willing to suffer with contacts just to get used to them at this point. I currently have RX, Ranger XL's. Problem is the prescription is three years old, and only corrected to see far. Lasik, I am kind of leery about. I know it is done million of times a day. Just can't afford that at this time anyway.

    Unplugged,

    Good post. That is very helpful. As are most so far.

    Keep them coming with your experience of having to correct both near and far vision, and the combo, or singular distance correction used while shooting.
     
  10. Ken Brandt

    Ken Brandt Active Member

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    Flyn;

    I have worn glasses since the 6th grade, to many year's ago to talk about. 18 year's ago I tried contact's for shooting. Best move I have ever made. I have moderately severe astigmitism in my dominant eye and have to wear a toric lense in that eye and standard lense in the other eye.

    The toric lense is weighted for the astigmitism and that can be the toughest thing to get used to. When you first put them in place your vision is not the best until they settle in place. Usually takes 5 to 10 minutes. After that you should be good to go. The weighting of the toric can be a little tough to get perfect but your eye doctor should be able to help you with free samples until you get it right.

    I would recomecd you go distance vision in both eye's, after all your looking at the target not the bead.

    I also fight allergies and my eye doctor recomended Zaditor eye drops. Put a drop in each eye before you put the contact's in and unless the pollen count is through the roof you should do o.k.

    Hope this help's. p.m. me if you have any other questions.

    Ken
     
  11. claybrdr

    claybrdr Well-Known Member

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    I shoot with mono vision with one contact in right eye for distance. I've used this for everyday use for so long that I can't adjust back to prescription lenses. Just wasted $240 finding that out. Also used to put a distance contact in my left eye when shooting but couldn't see any benefit and since my vision is sharper with the contact in my left eye it would occasionally lead to cross firing. Dry eyes is a much bigger issue for me.
     
  12. wm rike

    wm rike Member

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    I require a fair amount of correction and have worn hard contacts for about 50 yrs. As to accuity, my opthamolgist (a skeet shooter, so he knows how vision fits into the game) maintains that glasses will give the best vision, but only if looking through the center of the lenses. He puts hard contact right behind glasses in terms of accutiy, with the added bonus of no distortion. I subscribe to all that.

    The only problem I encounter is the eye tending to water if there is a side wind.
     
  13. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    <blockquote><I>"That's BS Keller. I see better with contacts, and I actually have peripheral vision. You won't get that with glasses...</I></blockquote>Don't tell me...go argue with the doc who gave me that opinion!

    Keller
     
  14. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    I originally wore glasses and shot using Rx glasses, had lenses dipped into a couple of colors. However, as you know, Rx change. When I made the jump to contacts, I still wore my glasses for shooting... Rx glasses are expensive...

    When I decided to try my contacts with plano shooting glasses, It took some getting used to, but my single vision contacts were OK for both relatively close work and distance, but then Rx continues to change...

    The problem I encountered a few years ago (@age 47), was I could no longer adjust for BOTH distance and close up and now required a bi-focal... not ready for that mentally, I asked the doc to compromise my Rx, for mainly distance, but with a bit to read the car dash board... that experiment lasted one contacts purchase cycle - the compromise could not give the long distance clarity I needed for trap.

    Today my Rx is corrected solely for distance and I wear mild readers... they give me a "distinguished" look...

    The contacts that I wear are 30 day disposables from Cooper...

    Best regards,

    Jay
     
  15. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Jay

    Sounds like you are on the same schedule as myself. It would be nice if you could have such a thing as Bi-Focal Contacts. That is the nice thing about Progressive Lens Glasses. You can see clearly from a mile, to one foot from your face. Problem is when I use my RX glasses for shooting, I need to sign up with my regular glasses, or I can't see where or what I am writing. Then I go out and get my shooting glasses. Problem is, if I need to look at something close up from that point, my arms are not long enough. LOL. It's frustrating to go from non-corrected 20/14 vision to the 20/40 I am now in a matter of five years. I know they are not that bad, but like I said, I think it is just what I was used to, without the hassle of the glasses.

    claybrdr,

    That's exactly what I am trying to avoid with this thread. The wasted $240.

    Thanks again guys for your replies. I guess it is going to have to be two eyes Contact corrected, out to 40 yds., or so.

    Question; When you do take out the Contact that is correcting for close vision, and replace it with the distance contact for shooting, how long does it take for that eye to adjust? For instance, I use the "mono" contact procedure for everyday correction, but change it to long distance in both for shooting once I arrive at the Club? Thanks, Jon
     
  16. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    <blockquote><I>"It would be nice if you could have such a thing as Bi-Focal Contacts."</i></blockquote>They are available. All ya gotta do is ask. (And to answer your unasked question...they cover the whole front of the eye and your eyelids hold them in place. They stay still and your eye can move underneath them.)

    Keller
     
  17. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Wow! Pretty cool if you can manage those. Because of the eye movement side to side for shooting, I am not sure these would work. The rings would make the bird go in and out of focus. Can't imagine that would not cause a flinch. LOL If they could stay aligned on your eye so as to have the two corrections separated from top to bottom that may work. That may be where those weighted lenses may help. Hmmm.

    OK, has anyone ever tried these Bi-Focal Contacts while shooting?
     
  18. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    You were faster than me... see the link (with animated demo) in my post above yours!

    Keller
     
  19. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Keller, I see that now. Can't imagine what the cost is? Hope not more then the $450 dollars the glasses cost. No titanium frames! LOL
     
  20. PILLMAN

    PILLMAN TS Member

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    I used to have bi-focal contacts , but changed to mono vision for shooting . They used to rotate on my eyes , changed vision , could not see target very well. I am near sighted and have astigmatism , use readers for close work . Phil Burton #9502565
     
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