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Evenings @ Troy after Vandalia's Daily Events

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by 4evertrap, Nov 19, 2012.

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  1. 4evertrap

    4evertrap Member

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    Evenings @ Troy after Vandalia

    This is for those of you having had the pleasure to participate in the evening activities at Troy after the Grand events at Vandalia were done for the day.

    I would like to know what the money shoot format was, what the entry fees were, how the payouts worked. Did they offer food and drink….?

    What was it about that shoot that made it so much fun and created such a draw for the shooters.

    Appreciate any info your care to share, if you have any great stories that would be great too!

    Thanks for the help!

    4ever
     
  2. over the hill

    over the hill Active Member

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    I'm sure the good Dr. will give all the info. you wan't soon.

    I never shot Troy, but they had a hell of a Calcutta and gave away great prizes as well as cash won.

    End of an era.



    Regards....Gerald
     
  3. Gun Run

    Gun Run Member

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    We used to shoot the 50 bird shoot every evening. It was 25 16's & 25 what you broke. It was the largest 50 bird shoot I've ever been in. It lasted well beyond midnight. I broke a 49 x 50 one night & won over $400.00 which was a lot of money back then. As for eating, there was a restaurant out front where you turned in that served great meals.Camp Troy also had a 100 bird event going on during the daytime. I can't remember if is was registered or not. It got crazy runing back & forth between the Grand & there. The had "tin art" in the form of an Indian Chef made by shooting .22's at on display in the building. They offered modest camping as well. Great place to shoot & we liked it. Wayne Downham
     
  4. teddy34

    teddy34 TS Member

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    I shot Troy in 74. Had shot fairly well at Grand, but Troy's targets were
    much tougher.
     
  5. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    they did have a system that if they saw you shooting good all of a sudden the last trap got "really wide and hard angles". not sure if they had a radio or not but that last trap was tough.
     
  6. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    What it was all about was the money. Tougher targets made a challange for even the best when they shot there.

    As motordoc stated, mysterious circumstances pervailed if you were shooting well...
     
  7. Big Heap

    Big Heap TS Member

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    THOF remembers Troy:

    Roger Clyne


    Year Inducted: 2006
    State: OH

    Robert and Roger Clyne of Troy, Ohio perfected the first electrically powered cocking and releasing mechanism for throwing clay targets that was successfully produced commercially—an invention that made possible for clubs to save time and money.

    Patented in 1947, the Clyne Puller was first used at the Grand in 1948. Because it was attachment that could be installed on present traps, gun clubs could update their operatic with a minimum of expense. The Clyne Pull was used throughout the country and also Europe and South America.

    "It's one of the things that changed trapshooting the most through the years," Dave Bohlender told Jim Morris of the Dayton Daily News. "There are several reasons why scores have improved, and it is one of them." Bohlender put the Clyne brothers' names in front of the Hall of Fame selection committee and for many years advocated their induction.

    Bob Allen, 1982 Trapshooting Hall of Far enshrinee, once wrote an article on the hand pulled traps used in the past and said this about the Clyne Puller: "Prior to the Clyne Puller, traps we released by a mechanical pipe running through the ground to the trap and back to a pull station behind the firing line. Depending upon the physical strength and reflexes of the puller, the kind of pulls received was anything but consistent. The Clyne Puller did much improve this situation.

    "The Clyne Puller was also a boon to the clubs as a labor saver. With the old mechanical puller, a separate scorekeeper was required now with the Clyne Puller the same person could score and pull. Thus the Clyne Puller was a great milestone in the trapshooting world."

    Roger and Robert Clyne had a small machine shop and in the 1940s and 1950s ran the Camp Troy Gun Club, where the electric puller was first used. This club was also well known for its night shoots during the Grand.

    In addition, Bob and his wife Katie cashier at the Grand along with other shoots in Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Florida and in the West.
     
  8. 4evertrap

    4evertrap Member

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    This is fantastic stuff! So how much were the entry fees, Troy must have put up a bunch of extra money up to make it even more attractive. Thanks for all the info !
     
  9. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    I don't remember what the entry fees were now. What I do remember was everyone had a different mind set about shooting handicap in my early days and before. Handicap was how much money you could win and as such, people played the options. The "baggers" were there in force along with everday Joe and the talents of the game.
     
  10. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    i believe that some of the people never shot vandalia and just went to shoot at troy. Yes you could shoot is as many times as you wanted. Many of the big guys of the day were there shooting till late in the evening.
     
  11. Snookassassin

    Snookassassin Member

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    I shot at Troy in 1975, my first year of trapshooting. I broke 50 in the "Derby" and won a substantial amount of cash but that wasn't the real treat. I was squadded with Frank Little and Beuford Bailey, All Americans that I had read about but never seen. Accepting congrats from those guys (they both broke 49) was better than the money.

    Snookassassin, Clif Adams
     
  12. 1oldtimer

    1oldtimer TS Member

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    Not sure of the date, (1960's?)but I shot some practice rounds there. The angles and speed were not ATA legal. They had those babies cranked up.They sold reloading supplys there & I bought my 1st sleeve of primers there. around $40. After breaking 18-20, I said this is too tough for me and went back to the Grand.
    Clyde Doll
     
  13. Bazooka Joe

    Bazooka Joe Member

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    They had wooden slats on the walls with the names of all the shooters that broke a 100 or two hundred straight. It was a list of all the top shooters in the country. Shot there on a squad with Frank Little and Ray Stafford.

    The building wasn't much and the roof leaked like a sleeve when it rained, but it was where all the action was just about any time of day.

    Rick
     
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